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Publications (9)13.17 Total impact

  • Bennett M Brooks
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    ABSTRACT: The Technical Committee on Architectural Acoustics (TCAA) is a Registered Provider in the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Continuing Education System (CES). The TCAA has developed a standardized introductory short course for architects called "Architectural Acoustics," for which attendees can earn one continuing education unit (CEU). This paper will cover the administrative requirements of the AIA/CES, to prepare potential presenters. These requirements include the proper handling of paperwork so that AIA members may receive credit for the course. The manner in which the course is given is also dictated by AIA requirements. TCAA membership and attendance at this workshop are required to qualify as an authorized presenter for this AIA/CES short course. Of course, anyone is free to register with the AIA to provide their own CEU program. However, the advantages of participating in this program are that the TCAA short course is already prepared, it is pre-approved by the AIA, and the registration fees are paid by the Acoustical Society of America.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 11/2013; 134(5):4118. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Bennett M Brooks, Brigitte Schulte-Fortkamp
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    ABSTRACT: A workshop was held at the 164th Meeting of the ASA in Kansas City on methodology standardization for the advancement of the developing field of soundscape measurement, analysis, and design. The workshop focused on the terminology lexicon used for soundscape subject interviews. Interviews of local experts, residents, and other users and inhabitants of the sonic environment can yield insights into both personal reactions and universal observations. The specific terminology used in this process may significantly affect the outcomes. As the success of a new research or development project can depend on the lessons learned from previous projects, the standardization of interview techniques becomes increasingly important. Workshop participants were invited to develop a standardized lexicon of descriptors for field use in interview questionnaires. After a review of soundscape objectives and procedures, the participants reviewed key issues and assessed available lexicon term types. The group then proposed, developed, and prioritized terms which could describe a soundscape as it is contextually perceived by an interview subject. Two key conditions were considered for each proposed lexicon term: would the term be commonly understood, and would the term describe a reaction to the soundscape of sufficiently notable intensity. The results of the workshop are presented.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 05/2013; 133(5):3370. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Bennett M Brooks
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    ABSTRACT: The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Accredited Standards Committee S12 (Noise) Working Group (WG) 41 has been developing a draft standards document for over 12 years. The current document is in Draft #9, now under development. This document represents the consensus of many stakeholders in the community noise arena, including industry, government, consulting, and the public. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to government officials, acoustical consultants, and other interested persons on how to develop a community noise ordinance or regulation, which is appropriate for the existing local circumstances. The document addresses issues such as public and government priorities and values, and available resources, and also provides the technical basis to manage the local sound environment. The keys to the effectiveness of the document are that it provides a menu of options for the user, discusses the trade-offs involved for decisions that must be made by government officials, and emphasizes that enforcement of a community noise ordinance is crucial to its success. A description of the current draft is presented.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 05/2013; 133(5):3275. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this workshop is to work toward methodology standardization for the advancement of the developing field of soundscape measurement, analysis and design. The workshop will focus on the terminology lexicon used for soundscape subject interviews. Interviews of local experts, residents and other users and inhabitants of the sonic environment can yield insights into both personal reactions and universal observations. The specific terminology used in this process may significantly affect the outcomes. As the success of a new research or development project can depend on the lessons learned from previous projects, the standardization of interview techniques becomes increasingly important. Workshop participants are invited to develop a standardized lexicon of descriptors for field use in interview questionnaires. The lexicon development will be based on the results of earlier ASA soundscape workshops, and the concurrent activities in ISO and COST Working Groups. An introductory keynote address will review the topics, objectives, and procedures for the day's discussion. The participants will then break out into smaller subgroups to review key issues and to assess the available lexicon terms. The entire group will reassemble to report, assess, and prioritize the proposed actions.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 09/2012; 132(3):1959. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Bennett M Brooks
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    ABSTRACT: Two powerful analysis techniques available to acoustical researchers and designers include the sound quality method and the very similar soundscape method. In each of these techniques physical acoustical measurements are combined with in-depth interviews and opinion juries to determine the cause and effect relationship that a particular sound, or set of sounds, has on a population. The sound quality technique has been in use for many years, and focuses on product development. An example is the sound of an automobile door closing - is the car door closing sound perceived as "solid and expensive" or "cheap and tinny". Another example is a vacuum cleaner - does it sound "powerful and effective" or "weak and ineffective"? The soundscape technique focuses on environmental sound, often in public spaces like a park or in a residential neighborhood. For example, is a certain transportation vehicle sound or outdoor entertainment facility sound acceptable or unacceptable to the wider community? This paper will explore the similarities between these two related fields and the opportunities they offer to sound designers.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 09/2012; 132(3):1924. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Brigitte Schulte-Fortkamp, Bennett Brooks
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    ABSTRACT: Instead of calculations about noise, the soundscape approach uses the experience of the people who live in the environment as an essential part of the evaluation and also of the design of the environment. This is proven to lead to novel and effective solutions regarding developments and changes in diverse areas. Recent decisions regarding soundscape research as in the ISO TC43∕S1∕WG54 and the COST project TD 0804 will support and connect these promising procedures and solutions in a network. In this presentation, experiences in projects concerning methods and procedures with regard to upcoming research in diverse fields of changes will be addressed. For the evaluation procedure, it is needed to integrate physical and perceptual context variables, and to prove that soundscape is not just a matter of noise level reduction but accounts for peoples concerns and acceptance. Therefore, soundscape approaches will guide the paths in future research concerning community noise.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 10/2010; 128(4):2370. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Brigitte Schulte-Fortkamp, Bennett Brooks
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    ABSTRACT: The perception of the soundscape can provide comfort, tranquility, and needed information to the person concerned or may be a source of annoyance. The combination of physical acoustical measurements with the scientific evaluation of perceptual responses to environmental sound, known as soundscaping, is an essential method for the assessment and actualization of positive outdoor environments. The characterization of the acoustical environment includes identifying the nature of the sound sources and the reactions of the perceivers. Soundscaping provides for the measurement, analysis, and design of environmental sound by applying the knowledge of both science and community experts. Much fundamental and practical research has been conducted to establish the bases for the soundscape field. In recent sessions and workshops researchers and practitioners have begun to standardize the available soundscape techniques to allow for more comparison of test and survey results and wider application in design. This workshop continues the discussion, evaluation, and standardization of proposed methods and techniques for soundscape analysis and design. The areas of focus will be a catalog of correlations between physical parameters and perceptual responses, the standardization of a terminology lexicon of soundscape descriptors, and the standardization of measurement procedures.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 11/2008; 124(4):2552. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Brigitte Schulte-Fortkamp, Bennett M. Brooks
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 01/2007; 122(5). · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Acoustics Today 01/2007; 3(1).