Antje van Lessen

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlín, Berlin, Germany

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Publications (15)39.45 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT A better understanding of events triggering chronic myeloid leukemia progression are critical to optimised clinical management of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We sought to validate that increased Musashi 2 (MSI2), a post transcription regulator, expression is associated with progression and prognosis. Screening of 152 CML patients showed MSI2 was significantly decreased among CML patients in CP at diagnosis (p<0.0001), but found no significant difference between the normal control group and treated CML patients in CP. Moreover it was significantly increased (p<0.0001) in advance disease (AD) CML patients. Furthermore, our human hematopoietic cell line data imply MSI2 and BCR-ABL1 mRNA expression correlate. However, these data cast a doubt on earlier reports that MSI2 effects HES1 expression via NUMB-NOTCH signaling.
    Leukemia and Lymphoma 11/2014; DOI:10.3109/10428194.2014.981175 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) belongs to the subgroup of mature T cell lymphomas according to the World Health Organization and is one of the common T cell lymphomas in Western countries. Particularly in cases in which histological confirmation cannot be easily achieved, immunophenotyping of peripheral blood can give important information for the differential diagnosis of AITL. sCD3(-) CD4(+) T cells are a typical feature of AILT in flow cytometry of peripheral blood. In this retrospective study, the diagnostic value of flow cytometry for the diagnosis 'AITL' was assessed by comparing the frequency of sCD3(-) CD4(+) T cells in leukemic AITL patients and in patients with other leukemic CD4(+) T cell lymphomas. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood by flow cytometry was performed in a lymphocyte gate using fluorochrome-labelled antibodies against CD3, CD2, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD10, CD14, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD57 and T cell receptor. In 17/17 leukemic AITL patients, a small but distinct population of sCD3(-) CD4(+) T cells was detected (mean percentage of sCD3(-) CD4(+) T cells in the lymphocyte gate: 11.9 ± 15.4%, range 0.1-51.8%). In contrast, sCD3(-) CD4(+) T cells were found in only 1/40 patients with other leukemic CD4(+) T cell lymphomas (one patient with mycosis fungoides). sCD3(-) CD4(+) T cells have a high positive predictive value (94%) for the diagnosis 'AITL'. Flow cytometry is particularly useful in the differential diagnosis of AITL, even if the aberrant T cell population has a very low frequency. Further biological characterization of this subfraction of lymphoma cells is warranted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Hematological Oncology 03/2014; 32(1). DOI:10.1002/hon.2080 · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leukemia-associated antigens such as proteinase-3 (PR3) and Wilms´ tumor protein-1 (WT-1) are potential targets of T-cell responses, which can be monitored by T-cell assays within vaccination trials and after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) an aberrant cytokine profile of antigen-specific T-cells with predominant TNF-a secretion has previously been described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these TNF-a (+) /IFN-g (-) CD8 (+) T-cells can also be observed in AML patients after SCT. Eight HLA-A2 (+) AML patients at different time points after SCT were evaluated for HLA-A2-restricted CD8 (+) T-cell responses against PR3, WT-1 and influenza-A using pentamer staining and different cytokine-based T-cell assays. Antigen-specific T-cell immune responses against influenza-A and PR3 were observed in 4/8 patients, WT-1-specific T-cells could be detected in in 3/8 patients. Interestingly, four different cytokine secretion profiles of antigen-specific T-cells were detected: (1) IFN-g (+) /TNF-a (+) , (2) IFN-g (+) /TNF-a (-) , (3) TNF-a (+) / IFN-g (- ) and (4) IFN-g (-) /TNF-a (-) . TNF-a (+) / IFN-g (- ) CD8 (+) T-cells are an interesting biological phenomenon which can obviously be observed also in AML patients. This finding has important implications for both T-cell biology and monitoring within immunotherapy trials. The functional characterization of these TNF-a (+) / IFN-g (- ) CD8 (+) T-cells needs further investigations.
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 04/2013; 9(7). DOI:10.4161/hv.24250 · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multi-kinase inhibitors have been established for the treatment of advanced renal cell cancer (RCC), but long-term results are still disappointing and immunotherapeutic approaches remain an interesting experimental option particularly in patients with a low tumor burden. DC are crucial for antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cell immunity. Furthermore, allogeneic HLA-molecules pose a strong immunogenic signal and may help to induce tumor-specific T cell responses. In this phase I/II trial, 7 patients with histologically confirmed progressive metastatic RCC were immunized repetitively with 1 × 10 ( 7) allogeneic partially HLA-matched DC pulsed with autologous tumor lysate following a schedule of 8 vaccinations over 20 weeks. Patients also received 3 Mio IE IL-2 sec.c. once daily starting in week 4. Primary endpoints of the study were feasibility and safety. Secondary endpoints were immunological and clinical responses. Vaccination was feasible and safe with no severe toxicity being observed. No objective response could be documented. However, while all patients had documented progress at study entry, 29% of the patients showed SD throughout the study with a mean TTP of 24.6 weeks (range 5 to 96 weeks). In 3/7 patients, TH1-polarized immune responses against RCC-associated antigens were observed. In one patient showing a minimal clinical response and a TTP of 96 weeks, clonally proliferated T cells against yet undefined antigens were induced by the vaccine. Vaccination with tumor antigen loaded DC remains an interesting experimental approach, but should rather be applied in the situation of minimal residual disease after systemic therapy. Additional depletion of regulatory cells might be a promising strategy.
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 03/2013; 9(7). DOI:10.4161/hv.24149 · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Induction of regulatory T cells (Treg) is an important mechanism leading to tolerance against tumors. Increased levels of Treg have been described in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients and seem to correlate with an adverse outcome. Our study aimed to analyze the influence of sorafenib and sunitinib on the frequency of Treg in patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC). Treg were analyzed by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients (n=19) with histologically confirmed mRCC under treatment with either sunitinib (50 mg/d, n=11) or sorafenib (800 mg/d, n=8). Blood samples were taken before treatment and during the first, second, and third months of therapy. Flow cytometric analysis of PB mononuclear cells was performed using fluorochrome-labeled antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD25, and FOXp3. During the first month of therapy, patients treated with sorafenib showed a significant increase in FOXp3CD3CD4CD25 Treg (13.5 vs. 36.3% of gated cells, P=0.02, or 0.35 vs. 0.49% of total cells) and the ratio FOXp3 T cells/FOXp3 T cells (0.16 vs. 0.56 of gated cells, P=0.02). These elevated levels persisted throughout the treatment period. There was no influence of sunitinib on the frequency of Treg in our cohort of patients. Sorafenib, but not sunitinib, leads to an early and sustained increase in Treg in PB of mRCC patients. In immunoresponsive tumors such as RCC, immunological effects of kinase inhibitors are particularly relevant for the design of combination trials with immunotherapeutic agents. Our study suggests that sorafenib should be avoided in such a therapeutic setting.
    Anti-cancer drugs 12/2011; 23(3). DOI:10.1097/CAD.0b013e32834ee2b1 · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite novel targeted agents, prognosis of metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) remains poor, and experimental therapeutic strategies are warranted. Transfection of tumor cells with co-stimulatory molecules and/or cytokines is able to increase immunogenicity. Therefore, in our clinical study, 10 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A(*)0201(+) patients with histologically-confirmed progressive metastatic clear cell RCC were immunized repetitively over 22 weeks with 2.5-40 × 10(6) interleukin (IL)-7/CD80 cotransfected allogeneic HLA-A(*)0201(+) tumor cells (RCC26/IL-7/CD80). Endpoints of the study were feasibility, safety, immunological and clinical responses. Vaccination was feasible and safe. In all, 50% of the patients showed stable disease throughout the study; the median time to progression was 18 weeks. However, vaccination with allogeneic RCC26/IL-7/CD80 tumor cells was not able to induce TH1-polarized immune responses. A TH2 cytokine profile with increasing amounts of antigen-specific IL-10 secretion was observed in most of the responding patients. Interferon-γ secretion by patient lymphocytes upon antigen-specific and non-specific stimulation was substantially impaired, both before and during vaccination, as compared with healthy controls. This is possibly due to profound tumor-induced immunosuppression, which may prevent induction of antitumor immune responses by the gene-modified vaccine. Vaccination in minimal residual disease with concurrent depletion of regulatory cells might be one strategy to overcome this limitation.
    Gene therapy 11/2010; 18(4):354-63. DOI:10.1038/gt.2010.143 · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), dendritic cells (DC) and leukaemic cells share a common progeny, leading to constitutive expression of putative tumour antigens, such as bcr/abl, in DC. In this phase-I/II study, autologous DC were used as a vaccine in patients with chronic phase bcr/abl+ CML, who had not achieved an adequate cytogenetic response after treatment with alpha-interferon or imatinib. Ten patients were enrolled, DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes and vaccination consisted of four subcutaneous injections of increasing numbers of DC (1-50 x 10(6) cells per injection) on days 1, 2, 8 and 21. Vaccination was feasible and safe. Improvement of the cytogenetic/molecular response, as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), was possibly related to vaccination in four of 10 patients. In three of these patients, T cells recognizing leukaemia-associated antigens became detectable. The proliferative capacity of PBMC in response to autologous DC increased after vaccination in all evaluable patients. We conclude that vaccination with autologous, non-irradiated 'leukaemic' DC is feasible, safe and induces anti-leukaemic T-cell responses in some CML patients. DC vaccination might be useful in CML as postremission therapy, i.e. after treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
    British Journal of Haematology 06/2007; 137(4):297-306. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2141.2007.06547.x · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to detect T cells against several chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML)-associated antigens we used: (i) a novel T-cell assay [cytometric bead array (CBA)]; (ii) gamma-interferon enzyme-linked immunoSPOT (gamma-IFN-ELISpot); and (iii) tetramer staining in peripheral blood from CML patients. Peptide-specific cytokine release was detected by CBA in some patients, whereas standard gamma-IFN-ELISpot and tetramer staining were negative in the vast majority of cases. In CBA, peptide-specific cytokine release was predominantly tumour necrosis factor-alpha, raising questions about the responding cells and their functional status. CBA appears to be a new useful tool for the detection of leukaemia-reactive T cells.
    British Journal of Haematology 02/2006; 132(1):32-5. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2141.2005.05844.x · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to evaluate CD52 as a target molecule for antibody therapy for multiple myeloma. Twenty consecutive bone marrow samples from myeloma patients were studied by flow cytometry using antibodies against CD45, CD38, CD138, CD3, CD19, and CD52. Most myeloma cells did not express CD52; CD52 expression was found only in a small subpopulation of plasma cells with a CD45+CD38++ phenotype. In contrast, the major fraction of myeloma cells (CD45-CD38++) was CD52-. Treatment of myeloma patients with anti-CD52 antibodies with the aim to reduce the number of myeloma cells in the CD45+CD38++ subfraction, which possibly contains a proliferative progenitor cell pool, would be at best a highly experimental approach. We conclude that CD52 is not a promising target for antibody-based therapies for most patients with multiple myeloma.
    International Journal of Hematology 11/2005; 82(3):248-50. DOI:10.1532/IJH97.E0435 · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) accounts for less than 1% of all lymphatic malignancies. Oligoclonality or monoclonality for any of the T-cell receptor (TCR) chain genes can be demonstrated in the majority of the cases. During systematic screening for the presence of circulating lymphocytes with atypical coexpression of differentiation antigens in patients with T-cell lymphomas, we have discovered a minor population (accounting for 0.2% to 10.% of all lymphocytes) of atypical lymphocytes in the blood of five of seven patients consecutively diagnosed in 1997/1998 by lymph node histology to have AITL. The major distinguishing feature of these cells consists of the lack of the surface expression of the CD3 antigen, but not of the intracellular expression. These cells express the T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 on their surface, but not CD7, and they express CD4 and CD45 at numbers of molecules per cell typical for T lymphocytes. Gene scan analyses for the TCR gamma chain revealed oligoclonality of these flow-sorted cells in one patient and monoclonality in two patients, the same patterns of TCR gamma chain gene as determined processing the respective diagnostic lymph nodes. Circulating CD4-expressing T lymphocytes with exclusively cytoplasmic expression of CD3 appear to represent the malignant population in patients with histologically diagnosed AITL.
    Cytometry 07/2000; 42(3):180-7. DOI:10.1002/1097-0320(20000615)42:33.0.CO;2-0
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    Stefan Serke, Antje van Lessen, Dieter Huhn
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    ABSTRACT: Three types of microbead calibrators available for quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry have been studied in parallel using a variety of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The QIFI kit is designed for indirect immunofluorescence (IF), and both the Quantum Simply Cellular (QSC) assay and the Quanti-BRITE assay are designed for direct IF. Because of the different nature of the respective ligands, epitopes on cells versus F'ab-portions on QSC beads, large differences in titration curves for a large number of CD MoAbs were noted between QSC beads and cells. Use of the QSC assay and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and phycoerythrin (PE) conjugates of the same CD reagent revealed substantially different numbers of cellular binding sites. Numbers of cellular binding sites as determined by direct IF using the Quanti-BRITE assay and by indirect IF using the QIFI kit were similar. We also found that erythrocyte (RBC)-lysing reagents cause varying and sometimes substantial reduction in the fluorescence intensity (FI) of cells stained directly with CD34 MoAb conjugates, but the RBC-lysing reagents had no effect on the FI of cells stained indirectly with the same CD34 MoAbs. This report defines a number of variables critical for standardized quantitative flow cytometry. We conclude that the choice of calibrators, fluorochrome conjugates, staining methods, and modes of sample processing can effect the determination of cellular binding sites to MoAbs. Direct immunofluorescence using the Quanti-BRITE assay and indirect IF using the QIFI kit appear to yield comparable results for the standardized determination of numbers of cellular binding sites to MoAbs.
    Cytometry 11/1998; 33(2):179-87. DOI:10.1002/(SICI)1097-0320(19981001)33:23.0.CO;2-R
  • S Serke, A van Lessen, I Pardo, D Huhn
    Journal of Hematotherapy 09/1998; 7(4):315-8. DOI:10.1089/scd.1.1998.7.315
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to optimize the flow cytometric determination of circulating normal and malignant plasma cells (PC). We investigated peripheral blood (PB) samples of 65 patients with multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance and 47 control subjects using CD38, CD45, B-B4, CD56, VLA-4, VLA-5 and CD19 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). Mono- or polyclonality was determined by staining of intracellular kappa and lambda light chains. Two subpopulations of PBPC were distinguished by differential expression of CD45. CD45 positive (CD45+) PC showed a more immature morphology and were detected in all groups. They were polyclonal in the control subjects and either poly- or monoclonal in the myeloma patients. In contrast, CD45 negative (CD45-) PBPC only occurred in myeloma patients and were consistently monoclonal, their presence being significantly associated with high disease activity (P < 0.001). Although detection of CD45- PBPC using CD38 or B-B4 MoAbs lead to similar results. CD45+ PBPC often were recognized to a lesser extent by B-B4 than by CD38 MoAbs. In conclusion, normal and malignant circulating PC can reliably be identified using CD38 and CD45 MoAbs. CD45 expression separates PBPC into two subsets of which the CD45- one only occurs in myeloma patients.
    British Journal of Haematology 04/1997; 97(1):56-64. DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2141.1997.d01-2115.x · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HLA-B27 is known to be highly associated with ankylosing spondylitis. Until now, nine B27 subtypes have been sequenced and may contribute in different fashions to ankylosing spondylitis. Additionally, the divergent subtypes may be of clinical importance in bone marrow transplantation with alternative donors. The purpose of this study was to determine the different subtypes of HLA-B27 by a direct sequencing approach. The typing strategy is based on a group-specific amplification of the second and third exon followed by automated fluorescence sequencing of the polymorphic regions. The extensive sharing of sequence motifs between the different B alleles made it impossible to specifically amplify the B27 group under the precondition of including all sequence variations necessary for a postamplification specificity step. Therefore, for setting up a direct sequencing approach of B27, co-amplified B alleles had to be taken into account. In order to get unambiguous sequencing chromatograms without any heterozygous positions, nested sequencing primers were used which selectively matched sequence motifs only present in the second and third exon of the amplified B27 alleles. This strategy allowed in all cases investigated a clear separation of the haplotypes, revealing unequivocal sequencing results. Using this method, we have investigated 93 B27-positive individuals. Sequencing identified the alleles B*2702, 2703, 2704, 2705, and 2707. B*2701, 2706, 2708, and 2709 were not represented in the population studied.
    Human Immunology 03/1996; 45(2):117-23. DOI:10.1016/0198-8859(95)00147-6 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel variant of the HLA-DR13 group is described. The new allele was found in a DR10, 13 heterozygous patient of Turkish origin, two HLA genotypically identical children of the patient typed as DR11,13, and one child typed as DR13,13. DR13 subtyping of the patient was initially performed by SSCP analysis of PCR-amplified DNA, using the 11th OHWS primers DRBAMP-3 and DRBAMP-B. Due to an unusual SSCP banding pattern, the PCR product was subjected to solid-phase sequencing. The sequence of the new allele, DRB1*1314, is different from that of DRB1*1307 by a single nucleotide substitution in codon 47, with T replacing consensus A. This results in a single amino acid change of tryptophan to phenylalanine in the first domain of the DR beta chain.
    Human Immunology 09/1995; 43(4):309-12. DOI:10.1016/0198-8859(95)00043-4 · 2.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

187 Citations
39.45 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2014
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • • Medical Department, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology
      • • Department of Pediatrics, Division of Oncology and Hematology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1997
    • Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
      • Department of Psychology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany