Andrea Bernardini

Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Latium, Italy

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Publications (7)11.54 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate if the occupational exposure to urban pollutants could cause alterations on 17-alfa-hydroxy-progesterone plasma levels and related diseases in male traffic policemen. 17-alpha-OH-P is synthesized in Leydig cells and in adrenals; it influences spermiogenesis, acrosoma reaction, testosterone biosynthesis, blocking of gonadotropin secretion; it regulates learning, memory and sleep. After excluding principal confounding factors, i.e., rotating or night shifts, exposure to solvents, paints and pesticides during time-off and smoking, traffic policemen were matched with controls by age, working life and drinking habit. Finally, 112 traffic policemen and 112 controls were included in the study. In traffic policemen 17-alpha-OH-P mean values were significantly higher vs. controls. The distribution of 17-alpha-OH-P values in both groups was significant. An increased frequency of fertility disorders referred to the questionnaire items were found in traffic policemen vs. controls, but the difference was not significant. The occupational exposure to low doses of chemical urban stressor, interacting with and adding to the psychosocial ones, could alter plasma 17-alpha-OH-P concentrations in traffic policemen vs. controls. 17-alpha-OH-P could be used as an early biological marker, even before the onset of the reproductive and mental health diseases.
    Industrial Health 02/2007; 45(1):170-6. DOI:10.2486/indhealth.45.170 · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Urban outside workers, such as traffic police, are daily exposed to air pollutants and psychosocial stressors: for these workers, the working environment corresponds to the living environment of the general population. Studies in the literature have shown that immune parameters could be affected by chronic exposure to various chemical pollutants. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether occupational exposure to urban pollutants can cause alterations in NK, IL-2, IFN-gamma and C3 plasma levels in female traffic police compared to a control group. After excluding subjects with the principal confounding factors, 86 female traffic police and 87 controls were matched by age, years of police work and habitual alcohol consumption. The distribution of NK values in female traffic police and controls was significantly different (p=0.000); NK values above the upper limit of the normal laboratory range were observed in 23 female traffic police and in 2 controls (p=0.000). IL-2 mean levels were higher in traffic police compared to controls, but the difference was not significant. The mean and the distribution of IFN-gamma values in female traffic police and controls were not different. C3 mean levels were higher in female traffic police versus controls, but the difference was not significant. Considering that the subjects with the principal confounding factors were excluded from the study and that female traffic police and controls were matched by the above-mentioned variables, our results suggest that chronic occupational exposure to low doses of chemical stressors, which may interact with and add to psychosocial ones, can affect both innate and adaptative immunity.
    Science of The Total Environment 11/2006; 370(1):17-22. DOI:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2006.05.015 · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate if the occupational exposure to urban stressors could cause alterations in interleukin-2 (IL-2), NK, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and C3 plasma levels in male traffic police officers compared to controls. After excluding the principal confounding factors, 108 traffic police officers were matched with 108 controls by age, working life, habitual consumption of alcohol and spirits. IL-2 mean levels were significantly higher in traffic police officers compared to controls (p=0.04). The distribution of IL-2 values in traffic police officers and in controls was significant (p=0.01). The distribution of NK value percentage in traffic police officers and in controls was significant (p=0.000). IFN-γ and C3 mean levels were not significant in traffic police officers compared to controls. Our results suggest that the occupational chronic exposure to low doses of urban stressors could affect NK and IL-2 plasma concentrations in traffic police officers of male sex.
    Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology 09/2006; 22(2):131-5. DOI:10.1016/j.etap.2006.01.003 · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to evaluate whether occupational exposure to urban pollutants could cause alteration in plasma 17-alpha-OH-P levels in female workers. After excluding the subjects with the principal confounding factors, traffic police and controls were matched by age, working life, age of menarche, menstrual cycle day, BMI, drinking habits, habitual consumption of soy and Italian coffee. 68 traffic police and 82 controls (7th day; follicular phase of the ovarian cycle), 37 traffic police and 20 controls (21st day; lutheal phase of the ovarian cycle) were included in the study and matched for the above mentioned variables. In follicular and lutheal phase of ovarian cycle, 17-alpha-OH-P mean levels and the distribution of 17-alpha-OH-P values were significantly higher in traffic police vs. controls. A higher instance of mental health disorders in traffic police vs. controls was found, although the difference was not significant. Considering that the potential confounding effect of extraneous factors was controlled by restricting the study population and by matching traffic police vs. controls on the above mentioned variables, our results suggest that occupational exposure to urban pollutants may alter plasma 17-alpha-OH-P concentrations. 17-alpha-OH-P could be used in an occupational setting as an early biomarker of exposure to urban pollutants, valuable for a group, even before the onset of related pathologies.
    International journal of immunopathology and pharmacology 01/2006; 19(4 Suppl):49-55. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to evaluate whether traffic police exposed to urban pollutants could be at risk of changes on proliferative response of blood lympho-monocytes to the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) compared to a control group. Traffic police were matched with controls by sex, age, length of service, drinking habits and smoking habits after excluding main confounding factors. So, 77 traffic police exposed to urban pollutants (43 men and 34 women) and 77 controls with indoor activity (43 men and 34 women) were included in the study. The proliferative response of blood lympho-monocytes to the mitogen PHA was significantly lower in male and female traffic police compared to controls (respectively, P=0.000 and 0.014). The possibility of an effect on immune system and therefore on the blood lympho-monocytes proliferative answer in traffic police exposed to urban pollutants, can be assumed.
    Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology 05/2004; 17(1):13-8. DOI:10.1016/j.etap.2004.01.004 · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to evaluate whether traffic policemen exposed to urban pollutants and possible psycho-social stressors could be at risk of changes on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH(P)] levels compared to a control group. Traffic policemen were matched by sex, age, length of service and drinking habit (<50 g of wine or beer per day) with a control group after excluding principal confounding factors; 62 traffic policemen with outdoor activity (34 men and 28 women) and 62 control subjects with indoor activity (34 men and 28 women) were included in the study. The levels of ACTH(P) were significantly higher in male and female traffic policemen than in the control subjects (respectively P=0.040, P=0.043). The authors hypothesise that occupational exposure to chemical and physical stressors, that may interact with possible psycho-social stressors, could cause a change in ACTH(P) levels in traffic policemen.
    Journal of Occupational Health 07/2003; 45(4):242-7. DOI:10.1539/joh.45.242 · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate if the occupational exposure to urban pollutants could cause alterations on 17-alfa-hydroxy-progesterone plasma levels and related diseases in male traffic policemen. 17-α α α α α-OH-P is synthesized in Leydig cells and in adrenals; it influences spermiogenesis, acrosoma reaction, testosterone biosynthesis, blocking of gonadotropin secretion; it regulates learning, memory and sleep. After excluding principal confounding factors, i.e., rotating or night shifts, exposure to solvents, paints and pesticides during time-off and smoking, traffic policemen were matched with controls by age, working life and drinking habit. Finally, 112 traffic policemen and 112 controls were included in the study. In traffic policemen 17-α α α α α-OH-P mean values were significantly higher vs. controls. The distribution of 17-α α α α α-OH-P values in both groups was significant. An increased frequency of fertility disorders referred to the questionnaire items were found in traffic policemen vs. controls, but the difference was not significant. The occupational exposure to low doses of chemical urban stressor, interacting with and adding to the psychosocial ones, could alter plasma 17-α α α α α-OH-P concentrations in traffic policemen vs. controls. 17-α α α α α-OH-P could be used as an early biological marker, even before the onset of the reproductive and mental health diseases.