Akashi Eda

Jichi Medical University, Totigi, Tochigi, Japan

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Publications (10)77.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: There have been no detailed reports directly comparing the expression of CDX1 with that of CDX2 in the inflammatory esophageal mucosa and Barrett's epithelium. The present study was designed to examine the expression of CDX 1/2 in inflammatory esophageal mucosa with or without Barrett's epithelium. The expression of CDX1/2 genes was analyzed using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 34 human esophageal biopsy specimens, and CDX2 expression was also evaluated immunohistochemically, using anti-human CDX2 monoclonal antibody. The biopsy specimens for RNA extraction were taken endoscopically from esophageal mucosa with mucosal break due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's epithelium, and normal epithelium. The expressions of mucin markers (MUC2) and intestine-specific genes (sucrase-isomal-tase, human defensin-5, alkaline phosphatase) were also comparatively analyzed. CDX1/2 expression was not found in the normal esophageal mucosa. The prevalence of CDX1/2 mRNA expression was significantly higher in the mucosa with Barrett's epithelium than in the mucosa without Barrett's epithelium. It is noteworthy, however, that the CDX2 mRNA expression was initiated at the stage of esophagitis, when neither CDX1 nor intestine-specific genes had emerged yet. In contrast to CDX2, CDX1 was expressed only in Barrett's epithelium. Immunohistochemical study demonstrated strong and extensive nuclear immunoreactivity for CDX2 in Barrett's epithelium. Furthermore, fine granular cytoplasmic staining was also observed in the cytoplasm in Barrett's epithelium, as well as in inflammatory esophageal mucosa. We report here, for the first time, that CDX2 is expressed in patients with Barrett's epithelium and inflammatory esophageal mucosa. These findings imply that the expression of CDX2 may be an early event leading to the development of Barrett's esophagus.
    Journal of Gastroenterology 02/2003; 38(1):14-22. · 3.79 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2003; 124(4). · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2003; 124(4). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gastric intestinal metaplasia occurs as a pathological condition in the gastric mucosa. To clarify how an intestine-specific homeobox gene, Cdx2, affects the morphogenesis of gastric mucosa, we generated transgenic mice expressing Cdx2 in parietal cells. Until Day 18 after birth, the number of parietal cells inthegastric mucosa of transgenic mice was the same as for their normal littermates. However, at Day 19, we detected several glands in which parietal cells disappeared and the proliferating zone moved from the isthmus to the base of the glands. Thereafter, parietal cells decreased gradually and disappeared at Day 37. All of the gastric mucosal cells, except for enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells, were completely replaced by intestinal metaplasia, consisting of goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells, and absorptive cells expressing alkaline phosphatase. Pseudopyloric gland metaplasia was also formed. The transgenic mouse is a very useful model for clarifying physiological differentiation of gastric and intestinal cell lineages and analyzing the molecular events from intestinal metaplasia to adenocarcinoma.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 07/2002; 294(2):470-9. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 plays an important role in differentiation and maintenance of intestinal epithelial cells. Development and progression of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the stomach is closely associated with Helicobacter pylori-gastritis. We investigated expression of CDX2 protein in the gastric mucosa with and without IM before and after eradication of H. pylori. The subjects comprised five normal controls and 29 H. pylori-positive patients (15 with antral IM and 14 without IM), who were followed for 12 months after eradication of H. pylori. Biopsies were taken from the greater curvatures of the antrum and middle body. Expression of CDX2 was evaluated immunohistochemically using anti-CDX2 antibody. CDX2 expression was not found in controls. Strong nuclear staining was observed extensively in IM, but rarely in the gastric epithelium, except for the focal area in only four antral biopsies (three with and one without IM). Fine granular cytoplasmic staining was also observed in the perinuclear regions of IM and the gastric epithelial cells in half of the patients. In 13 of the 15 patients with IM, IM did not regress after eradication of H. pylori, and the extent of nuclear staining in IM did not change. The extent of cytoplasmic staining did not change either. Our results indicate that CDX2 expression in the gastric mucosa is found in patients with chronic gastritis and is closely associated with IM. CDX2 expression in IM or the gastric epithelial cells did not disappear after eradication of H. pylori.
    Helicobacter 07/2002; 7(3):192-8. · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. The intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 plays an important role in differentiation and maintenance of intestinal epithelial cells. Development and progression of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the stomach is closely associated with Helicobacter pylori-gastritis. We investigated expression of CDX2 protein in the gastric mucosa with and without IM before and after eradication of H. pylori.Materials and Methods. The subjects comprised five normal controls and 29 H. pylori-positive patients (15 with antral IM and 14 without IM), who were followed for 12 months after eradication of H. pylori. Biopsies were taken from the greater curvatures of the antrum and middle body. Expression of CDX2 was evaluated immunohistochemically using anti-CDX2 antibody.Results. CDX2 expression was not found in controls. Strong nuclear staining was observed extensively in IM, but rarely in the gastric epithelium, except for the focal area in only four antral biopsies (three with and one without IM). Fine granular cytoplasmic staining was also observed in the perinuclear regions of IM and the gastric epithelial cells in half of the patients. In 13 of the 15 patients with IM, IM did not regress after eradication of H. pylori, and the extent of nuclear staining in IM did not change. The extent of cytoplasmic staining did not change either.Conclusions. Our results indicate that CDX2 expression in the gastric mucosa is found in patients with chronic gastritis and is closely associated with IM. CDX2 expression in IM or the gastric epithelial cells did not disappear after eradication of H. pylori.
    Helicobacter 05/2002; 7(3):192 - 198. · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The CDX1 and CDX2 genes are intestinal transcription factors that may be involved in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. There have been no detailed reports directly comparing the expression of CDX1 with that of CDX2 in chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Accordingly, we examined the expression of CDX1/2 and its association with the expression of other intestinal metaplasia-associated genes during the development of intestinal metaplasia. The expression of CDX1/2 genes was analyzed, using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, in 44 human gastric tissue samples obtained endoscopically. The expressions of mucin markers (MUC2, MUC5AC), intestine-specific genes (sucrase-isomaltase, human defensin-5, alkaline phosphatase), a gene marker for fundic gland area (H+/K+ATPase beta subunit), and a gene for entire gastric glands (pepsinogen C) were also comparatively analyzed. There was no expression of CDX1/2 in gastric mucosa not infected by Helicobacter pylori. The prevalence of CDX1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in mucosa with intestinal metaplasia than in mucosa without intestinal metaplasia. It is noteworthy that CDX2 was expressed in the antral and fundic mucosa in the absence of the expression of CDX1 and gene markers for intestinal metaplasia. The expression of CDX2 precedes those of CDX1, sucrase-isomaltase, other intestine-specific genes (human defensin-5, alkaline phosphatase), and MUC2 during the progression of intestinal metaplasia. These findings imply that the expression of CDX2 may trigger the initiation and development of intestinal metaplasia.
    Journal of Gastroenterology 02/2002; 37(2):94-100. · 3.79 Impact Factor
  • The American Journal of Gastroenterology 08/2001; 96(7):2283-5. · 9.21 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 04/2001; 120(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 04/2001; 120(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor