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Publications (8)11.54 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study is a secondary analysis of data gathered during baseline data collection prior to a cognitive-psychosocial-respite intervention provided in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Content analysis was used to identify themes in parents' responses to an open-ended item about their perceptions of the effects on siblings of having a brother or sister who has either cancer or cystic fibrosis (CF). Of 91 themes tallied in the cancer group (n = 29), 74.5% reflected negative manifestations of increased risk in siblings, 1.1% no risk; and 24.2%, positive outcomes. Of 53 themes tallied in the CF group (n = 15), the same three categories had 67.9 %, 0%, and 32.1%, respectively. Contemporary life in these families portrayed in parents' descriptions not only validate the rationale for the RCT done, but also suggest the need in ambulatory pediatrics for intervention research on these vulnerable populations.
    Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing 06/2009; 32(2):94-113.
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the outcomes of a structured, educational, and support group intervention (ISEE, Intervention for Siblings: Experience Enhancement) for siblings of children with chronic illness (cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and spina bifida), including a session with parents about sibling needs; and to describe sibling and parent perceptions of sibling experiences at home. One-group, pretest-posttest pilot study. A convenience sample of 22 siblings and parents. A Midwestern university medical center. Knowledge of Illness Test, parent ratings on a global, single item, 10-point scale. Sibling test scores increased significantly after intervention, compared to baseline. Parents' average evaluation rating was 9 on a 10-point scale. Parents supported their positive ratings with verbatim descriptions. Sibling and parent perceptions of sibling experiences were congruent, suggesting the sources of potential adjustment problems in siblings, and were consistent with the literature. A randomized, clinical trial with a larger sample size is needed to evaluate the intervention further.
    Journal of the Society of Pediatric Nurses: JSPN 01/2007; 2(3):127-37.
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    ABSTRACT: Siblings of children with chronic illness or disability have been reported to have a 1.6 to 2.0 risk for behavioral and mental health problems. Our objective was to examine the effects of an intervention for siblings (age 7-15 years) of children with chronic illness or disability. A randomized, three-group repeated-measures design was used: full intervention (n=79), partial intervention (n=71), and a waiting list control group (n=102). Outcomes were sibling knowledge about illness, behavior problems, social support, self-esteem, attitude, and mood measured over four postintervention periods. Covariates were family cohesion, maternal mood, socioeconomic status, and well sibling age. The full intervention included structured teaching and psychosocial sessions at a 5-day residential summer camp. The partial intervention included camp only. Treatment effects were estimated by using generalized estimating equation panel analyses. The full treatment group showed significant improvements on all six outcomes over most periods, the partial treatment group on three outcomes, and the control group on two outcomes. Improvements in outcomes ranged from 5% to 25% increases over baseline measures. A dose-response relationship to intervention was found. Treatment gains were sustained over a period of 12 months.
    Journal of Pediatrics 10/2003; 143(3):386-93. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A structural equation model (SEM) examined interrelationships among psychosocial variables known to affect the health and development of well siblings and parents when a child with a chronic illness or disability is a member of the family. Using dyads of 252 well children and parents, socioeconomic status (SES) and family cohesion were associated with the parent-reported behavior of the well sibling. SES also influenced the mood of the mother that in turn influenced family cohesion. The well sibling's knowledge about the illness of the brother or sister, attitude toward the illness, mood, self-esteem, and feelings of social support were interrelated and related to the behavior of the well sibling. The SEM suggests that interventions may be directed at several points in these interactions including boosting knowledge levels of the well sibling, improving family cohesion, and assuring adequate "income" support to the family through income transfers or in-kind services.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 11/2002; 25(5):411-24. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Examined parental and family variables that influenced sibling adjustment to living at home with a brother or sister with chronic illness. Intercorrelations among the variables of maternal mood, family cohesion, sibling perceptions of social support, self-esteem, and sibling mood were examined for 22 8–15 yr old siblings and parents of children with cystic fibrosis, diabetes, or spina bifida. Results indicated that positive maternal mood was associated with sibling perception of higher social support, which in turn was related to higher self-esteem and more positive sibling mood. Positive maternal mood was related to higher family functioning, which in turn was related to positive sibling mood. It is concluded that, despite favorable demographics and family connectedness, these family members experienced considerable distress. And although direct linkages did not appear between maternal mood and sibling mood and between family cohesion and sibling social support, it is possible such linkages may be found in studies with larger samples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Children s Health Care 01/1999; · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: purpose. To evaluate the outcomes of a structured, educational, and support group intervention (ISEE, Intervention for Siblings: Experience Enhancement) for siblings of children with chronic illness (cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and spina bifida), including a session with parents about sibling needs; and to describe sibling and parent perceptions of sibling experiences at home.design. One-group, pretest-posttest pilot studyparticipants. A convenience sample of 22 siblings and parentssetting. A Midwestern university medical centermain outcome measures. Knowledge of Illness Test, parent ratings on a global, single item, 10-point scaleresults. Sibling test scores increased significantly after the intervention, compared to baseline. Parents' average evaluation rating was 9 on a 10-point scale. Parents supported their positive ratings with verbatim descriptors. Sibling and parent perceptions of sibling experiences were congruent, suggesting the sources of potential adjustment problems in siblings, and were consistent with the literature.conclusions. A randomized, clinical trial with a larger sample size is needed to evaluate the intervention further.
    Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing 06/1997; 2(3):127 - 137. · 0.78 Impact Factor
  • Pediatric Research 01/1996; 39. · 2.67 Impact Factor
  • Adrienne. Liebergen
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    ABSTRACT: Thesis (M.N.)--University of Kansas, Nursing, 1982. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 65-68).