A. Valishev

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, United States

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Publications (106)237.94 Total impact

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    M. Zobov · A. Drago · A. Gallo · C. Milardi · D. Shatilov · A. Valishev
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    A. Valishev · D. Shatilov · C. Milardi · M. Zobov
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    A. Valishev · D. Shatilov · C. Milardi · M. Zobov
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    ABSTRACT: Current bearing wire compensators were successfully used in the 2005-2006 run of the DA{\Phi}NE collider to mitigate the detrimental effects of parasitic beam-beam interactions. A marked improvement of the positron beam lifetime was observed in machine operation with the KLOE detector. In view of the possible application of wire beam-beam compensators for the High Luminosity LHC upgrade, we revisit the DA{\Phi}NE experiments. We use an improved model of the accelerator with the goal to validate the modern simulation tools and provide valuable input for the LHC upgrade project.
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    M. Zobov · A. Drago · A. Gallo · C. Milardi · D. Shatilov · A. Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: After the successful completion of the SIDDHARTA experiment run with crab waist collisions, the electron- positron collider DA{\Phi}NE has started routine operations for the KLOE-2 detector. The new interaction region also exploits the crab waist collision scheme, but features certain complications including the experimental detector solenoid, compensating anti-solenoids, and tilted quadrupole magnets. We have performed simulations of the beam-beam collisions in the collider taking into account the real DA{\Phi}NE nonlinear lattice. In particular, we have evaluated the effect of crab waist sextupoles and beam-beam interactions on the DA{\Phi}NE dynamical aperture and energy acceptance, and estimated the luminosity that can be potentially achieved with and without crab waist sextupoles in the present working conditions. A numerical analysis has been performed in order to propose possible steps for further luminosity increase in DA{\Phi}NE such as a better working point choice, crab sextupole strength optimization, correction of the phase advance between the sextupoles and the interaction region. The proposed change of the e- ring working point was implemented and resulted in a significant performance increase.
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    Mikhail Zobov · Dmitry Shatilov · Alexander Valishev · Catia Milardi
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    ABSTRACT: Proton accumulator rings and other circular hadron accelerators are susceptible to intensity-driven parametric instabilities because the zero-current charged particle dynamics are characterized by a single tune. Landau damping can suppress these instabilities, which requires energy spread in the beam or introducing nonlinear magnets such as octupoles. However, this approach reduces dynamic aperture. Nonlinear integrable optics can suppress parametric instabilities independent of energy spread in the distribution, while preserving the dynamic aperture. This novel approach promises to reduce particle losses and enable order-of-magnitude increases in beam intensity. In this paper we present results, obtained using the Lie operator formalism, on how chromaticity and dispersion affect particle orbits in integrable optics. We conclude that chromaticity in general breaks the integrability, unless the vertical and horizontal chromaticities are equal. Because of this, the chromaticity correcting magnets can be weaker and fewer correcting magnet families are required, thus minimizing the impact on dynamic aperture.
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    S. A. Antipov · S. Nagaitsev · A. Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: At Integrable Optics Test Accelerator it is possible to create a nonlinear focusing optics with one invariant of motion using just conventional magnets. 6D simulations show that this will allow to achieve a tune spread of 0.05 without significant reduction of dynamic aperture.
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    V. Shiltsev · A. Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: Long-range beam-beam effects occurred in the Tevatron at all stages (injection, ramp, squeeze, and collisions) and affected both proton and antiproton beams. They resulted in beam losses and emittance blow-ups, which occurred in remarkable bunch-to-bunch dependent patterns. On the way to record-high luminosities of the collider, many issues related to the long-range beam-beam interactions have been addressed. Below we present a short overview of the long-range beam-beam effects in the Tevatron. (For a detailed discussion on the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron please see reviews in Refs. [1-3] and references therein).
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    ABSTRACT: The DAΦNE collider has been successfully commissioned after implementing major modification of the experimental detector and a general upgrade-consolidation program involving, although to a different extent, all the accelerator complex subsystems. This paper presents the Φ-Factory setup and the achieved performances in terms of beam dynamics, luminosity, detector background and related aspects.
    5th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC2014), Dresden, Germany; 06/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.
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    ABSTRACT: Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.
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    ABSTRACT: Beam-beam forces and collision optics can strongly affect beam lifetime, dynamic aperture, and halo formation in particle colliders. Extensive analytical and numerical simulations are carried out in the design and operational stage of a machine to quantify these effects, but experimental data is scarce. The technique of small-step collimator scans was applied to the Fermilab Tevatron collider and to the CERN Large Hadron Collider to study the effect of collisions on transverse beam halo dynamics. We describe the technique and present a summary of the first results on the dependence of the halo diffusion coefficient on betatron amplitude in the Tevatron and in the LHC.
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    Giulio Stancari · Alexander Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: At the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we studied the feasibility of suppressing the antiproton head-on beam-beam tune spread using a magnetically confined 5-keV electron beam with Gaussian transverse profile overlapping with the circulating beam. When electron cooling of antiprotons was applied in regular Tevatron operations, the nonlinear head-on beam-beam effect on antiprotons was small. Therefore, we first focused on the operational aspects, such as beam alignment and stability, and on fundamental observations of tune shifts, tune spreads, lifetimes, and emittances. We also attempted two special collider stores with only 3 proton bunches colliding with 3 antiproton bunches, to suppress long-range forces and enhance head-on effects. We present here the results of this study and a comparison between numerical simulations and observations. These results contributed to the application of this compensation concept to RHIC at Brookhaven.
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    G. Stancari · A. Valishev · S. M. White
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    ABSTRACT: A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Fermilab Tevatron collider is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier-analyzed offline with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of $1.6\times 10^{-5}$ in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented and compared with models of beam-beam oscillations.
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    A. Valishev · G. Stancari
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    ABSTRACT: Current wires are considered for compensation of long-range beam-beam interactions for the High Luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC) of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In this note, we demonstrate the advantage of using Electron Lens for this purpose instead of a conventional current-bearing wire.
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    ABSTRACT: The time evolution of beam losses during a collimator scan provides information on halo diffusion and population. This is an essential input for machine performance characterization and for the design of collimation systems. Beam halo measurements in the CERN Large Hadron Collider were conducted through collimator scrapings in a dedicated beam study for the first time at 4 TeV. Four scans were performed with two collimators, in the vertical plane for beam 1 and horizontally for beam 2, before and after bringing the beams into collisions. Inward and outward steps were performed. A diffusion model was used to interpret the observed loss rate evolution in response to the collimator steps. With this technique, diffusion coefficients were estimated as a function of betatron oscillation amplitude from approximately 3 to 7 standard deviations of the transverse beam distribution. A comparison of halo diffusion and core emittance growth rates is also presented.
    Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams 02/2013; 16(2):021003. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.16.021003 · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of nonlinear lattices with large betatron tune spreads can increase instability and space charge thresholds due to improved Landau damping. Unfortunately, the majority of nonlinear accelerator lattices turn out to be nonintegrable, producing chaotic motion and a complex network of stable and unstable resonances. Recent advances in finding the integrable nonlinear accelerator lattices have led to a proposal to construct at Fermilab a test accelerator with strong nonlinear focusing which avoids resonances and chaotic particle motion. This presentation will outline the main challenges, theoretical design solutions and construction status of the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator underway at Fermilab.
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    ABSTRACT: Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.
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    ABSTRACT: Experimental measurements of beam halo diffusion dynamics with collimator scans are reviewed. The concept of halo control with a hollow electron beam collimator, its demonstration at the Tevatron, and its possible applications at the LHC are discussed.
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    ABSTRACT: The two Tevatron Electron Lenses (TEL1 and TEL2) are installed in Tevatron in 2001 and 2006 respectively. TEL1 is operated as the vital parts of the Tevatron for abort gap beam clearing, while TEL2 is functioning as the backup as well as the test device for beam-beam compensation, space charge compensator and soft beam collimator. Both of them are working exceptionally reliable after a few initial kinks being worked out. Their operations in Tevatron are summarized in this report.

Publication Stats

672 Citations
237.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2010
    • Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)
      Batavia, Illinois, United States
  • 2003–2005
    • Russian Academy of Sciences
      Moskva, Moscow, Russia
  • 1998–2005
    • Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics
      Novo-Nikolaevsk, Novosibirsk, Russia
  • 1999–2003
    • Novosibirsk State University
      Novo-Nikolaevsk, Novosibirsk, Russia