A Rañó

Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (20)98.58 Total impact

  • Ana Rañó, Carlos Agustí
    07/2009: pages 283 - 304; , ISBN: 9780470714171
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the potential use of glucocorticoids as adjunctive therapy in the management of patients with severe bacterial pneumonia or pulmonary infections of other etiologies. The importance of an adequate assessment of the inflammatory process and the appearance of inflammatory markers that correlate with the severity of pneumonia is underlined. A recent randomized clinical trial indicates that adjunctive treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia with glucocorticoids reduces complications and improves survival. The role of glucocorticoids in other lung infections is also reviewed. The design of new compounds with similar anti-inflammatory properties to classical glucocorticoids but with significantly fewer side effects constitutes a specific challenge for the near future. Although adjunctive treatment with glucocorticoids in severe pneumonia is probably indicated, further randomized clinical trials are urgently needed to confirm the preliminary positive results. In this regard, a proper evaluation of the inflammatory response is likely to be essential for the accurate selection of the target population.
    Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases 05/2006; 19(2):179-84. · 4.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary infections are the most frequent complications in non-HIV-immunocompromised patients and portend a high mortality. This scenario represents a challenging task for clinicians and an important subject of clinical research from different perspectives. This review comments on the results of relevant original articles in this area published from 2003 to the present. The present review addresses the etiology of the pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients, the use of new emerging diagnostic tools and medical devices in the clinical management of these infiltrates, and the greater understanding of the inflammatory immune response associated with infection in this setting. Advances in diagnostic tests and therapeutic devices are facilitating the clinical management of pulmonary infections. New challenges are emerging, however, such as the growing evidence regarding the important role of respiratory viruses as a common cause of lower respiratory tract infections. Finally, new insights into the mechanisms of the inflammatory response associated with pulmonary complications can help understanding their pathogenesis, improve prevention and diagnosis, and anticipate future therapeutic modalities.
    Current opinion in pulmonary medicine 06/2005; 11(3):213-7. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A study was undertaken to evaluate the local and systemic inflammatory response associated with pulmonary complications in immunocompromised patients and potential implications regarding severity and prognosis. Levels of different inflammatory mediators were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum on days 1 and 4 after the identification of the pulmonary complication in 127 patients with different immunosuppressive conditions. Pulmonary complications were characterised by a high percentage of neutrophils and increased levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the BAL fluid and high serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP). The inflammatory response was similar in the different groups of immunocompromised patients evaluated. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines were higher in patients with pulmonary infections, particularly those of bacterial aetiology. Patients with a more severe pulmonary infection had a more intense local and systemic inflammatory response. A BAL fluid IL-6 level of >40 pg/ml was an independent predictor of mortality (OR 4.65, 95% CI 1.3 to 16.1), together with a need for mechanical ventilation (OR 13.5, 95% CI 3.2 to 57.3). Patients who died had persistently high levels of CRP on day 4. The evaluation of the inflammatory response, particularly the determination of IL-6 levels in the BAL fluid and CRP in the serum, may be useful for deciding the appropriate management of pulmonary complications in immunocompromised patients.
    Thorax 12/2004; 59(12):1081-8. · 8.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We analyzed the characteristics of the inflammatory response occurring in blood during pulmonary infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. A prospective study of consecutive hospital admissions of HIV-infected patients with new-onset radiologic pulmonary infiltrates was carried out in a tertiary university hospital from April 1998 to May 2001. Plasma cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels were determined at the time of admission and 4, 5, and 6 days later. Patients were included in a protocol addressed to study etiology and outcome of disease. A total of 249 episodes of infection were included, with the main diagnoses being bacterial pneumonia (BP) (118 episodes), Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) (41 episodes), and mycobacteriosis (36 episodes). For these three patient groups, at the time of admission the median CRP and cytokine levels were as follows: CRP, 10.2, 3.8 and 5 mg/dl, respectively (P = 0.0001); IL-8, 19, 3, and 2.9 pg/ml (P = 0.045); and TNF-alpha, 46.4, 44, and 75 pg/ml, respectively (P = 0.029). There were no significant differences in levels of IL-1beta, IL-6, or IL-10 among the patient groups. A total of 23 patients died. At the time of admission, HIV-infected patients with BP had higher plasma CRP and IL-8 levels than did PCP and mycobacteriosis patients. TNF-alpha levels were higher in patients with mycobacteriosis. An elevated IL-8 level (>61 pg/ml) at the time of admission was an independent factor associated with higher mortality (odds ratio, 12; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 235.5).
    Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 06/2004; 11(3):608-14. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nosocomial pneumonia represents a serious challenge for clinicians caring for IC patients. Although there have been advances in prophylactic, preemptive, and therapeutic measures, the implications of an inadequate empirical treatment for survival require a prompt and active attitude. A great diversity of diagnostic and laboratory procedures is currently available. In each case, the clinician must determine the tests that should be performed based on different variables. The proper use of noninvasive and bronchoscopic procedures substantially increases the diagnostic yield causing changes in the empirical treatment in most patients. The authors believe that fiberoptic bronchoscopy must be done early when the pulmonary infiltrates are identified if there is not a rapid (48 hours) and clear response to empiric treatment. This approach allows the establishment of a more specific treatment when the possibilities of full recovery are still high. The potential benefit of treatment modifications for survival in IC patients who require MV and undergo bronchoscopy is most probably minimal, because of the severity and irreversibility of the underlying pulmonary process. It is hoped that the application of molecular tools in diagnosis and the advances in preventive strategies and therapeutic agents will improve the survival of NP in a population of IC patients that is expected to grow over the next years.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2004; 17(4):785-800. · 2.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Glucocorticoid treatment alters immunoregulatory defense mechanisms and may therefore favor the development of different pulmonary infections. The etiology, prognostic factors, and associated inflammatory response of pulmonary infiltrates in 33 patients receiving long-term glucocorticoid treatment (LTGCT) were prospectively evaluated. Aspergillus spp (n = 9, 31%) and Staphylococcus spp (n = 6, 21%) were the most common causative agents. Using different diagnostic techniques, we obtained a specific diagnosis in 28 of 33 episodes (85%) of pulmonary infiltrates. Bronchoscopic techniques provided the diagnosis in 64% of the cases. Crude mortality was 45%. Variables associated with mortality were as follows: age > 64 years, bilateral radiographic involvement, delay in diagnosis, inappropriate empirical treatment, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II > or = 25, and requirement for mechanical ventilation (MV). SAPS II > or = 25 (odds ratio [OR], 16; 95% confidence interval, 1 to 260) and MV requirement (OR, 50; 95% confidence interval, 2 to 360) were also significant on multivariate analysis. Pulmonary infections were associated with an increase in the concentration of relevant inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 both in serum and BAL. This local and systemic inflammatory response was attenuated when compared with the response observed in patients with pulmonary infections but without glucocorticoid treatment or receiving glucocorticoids for a short period of time (< 9 days). Pulmonary infiltrates in patients receiving LTGCT are often caused by fungi and Gram-positive cocci, and are associated with attenuated local and systemic inflammatory response. Although in most cases, sputum cultures and bronchoscopic techniques are diagnostic, the associated mortality is high, particularly in those requiring MV.
    Chest 02/2003; 123(2):488-98. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite comprehensive diagnostic work-up, the aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains undetermined in 30-60% of cases. The authors studied factors associated with undiagnosed pneumonia. Patients hospitalised with CAP and being evaluated by two blood cultures, at least one valid lower respiratory tract sample, and serology on admission were prospectively recorded. Patients who had received antimicrobial pretreatment were excluded. Patients with definite or probable aetiology were compared to those with undetermined aetiology by uni- and multivariable analysis. A total 204 patients were eligible for the study. The aetiology remained undetermined in 82 (40%) patients, whereas a definite aetiology could be established in 89 (44%) and a probable one in 33 (16%). In multivariable analysis, factors associated with undetermined aetiology included age >70 yrs, renal and cardiac comorbidity, and nonalveolar infiltrates on the chest radiograph. There was no association of undiagnosed pneumonia with mortality. Age and host factors were associated with unknown aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia. Some of these cases may also represent fluid volume overload mimicking pneumonia.
    European Respiratory Journal 11/2002; 20(5):1254-62. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the outcome and the prognostic factors in 200 non-HIV immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates (PIs). Prospective observational study. An 800-bed university hospital. Two hundred non-HIV immunocompromised patients (hematologic malignancies, 79 patients; hematopoietic stem cell transplants [HSCTs], 61 patients; and solid-organ transplants, 60 patients). Investigation of prognostic factors related to mortality using a multiple logistic regression model. Specific diagnosis of the PI was obtained in 78% of the cases (infectious origin was determined in 74%). The overall mortality rate was 39% (78 of 200 patients). Patients with HSCT had the highest mortality rate (53%). A requirement for mechanical ventilation (odds ratio [OR], 28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9 to 93), an APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) II score of > 20 (OR, 5.5; 95% CI, 2 to 14.7), and a delay of > 5 days in establishing a specific diagnosis (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.2 to 9.6) were the variables associated with mortality at the multivariate analysis. The subgroup analysis based on underlying disease confirmed the prognostic significance of these variables and the infectious etiology for the PI. Mortality in immunocompromised patients is high, particularly in patients undergoing HSCT. Achieving an earlier diagnosis potentially may improve the mortality rate of these patients.
    Chest 07/2002; 122(1):253-61. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A diagnostic protocol was started to study the etiology of pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients. The diagnostic yields of the different techniques were analyzed, with special emphasis on the importance of the sample quality and the role of rapid techniques in the diagnostic strategy. In total, 241 patients with newly developed pulmonary infiltrates within a period of 19 months were included. Noninvasive or invasive evaluation was performed according to the characteristics of the infiltrates. Diagnosis was achieved in 202 patients (84%); 173 patients (72%) had pneumonia, and specific etiologic agents were found in 114 (66%). Bronchoaspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage showed the highest yields, either on global analysis (23 of 35 specimens [66%] and 70 of 134 specimens [52%], respectively) or on analysis of each type of pneumonia. A tendency toward better results with optimal-quality samples was observed, and a statistically significant difference was found in sputum bacterial culture. Rapid diagnostic tests yielded results in 71 of 114 (62.2%) diagnoses of etiological pneumonia.
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology 07/2002; 40(6):2134-40. · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A study was undertaken to investigate the incidence, diagnostic yield of non-invasive and bronchoscopic techniques, and risk factors of airway colonisation in patients with bronchiectasis in a stable clinical situation. A 2 year prospective study of 77 patients with bronchiectasis in a stable clinical condition was performed in an 800 bed tertiary university hospital. The interventions used were pharyngeal swabs, sputum cultures and quantitative protected specimen brush (PSB) bacterial cultures (cut off point > or =10(2) cfu/ml) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (cut off point > or =10(3) cfu/ml). The incidence of bronchial colonisation with potential pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) was 64%. The most frequent PPMs isolated were Haemophilus influenzae (55%) and Pseudomonas spp (26%). Resistance to antibiotics was found in 30% of the isolated pathogens. When the sample was appropriate, the operative characteristics of the sputum cultures were similar to those obtained with the PSB taken as a gold standard. Risk factors associated with bronchial colonisation by PPMs in the multivariate analysis were: (1) diagnosis of bronchiectasis before the age of 14 years (odds ratio (OR)=3.92, 95% CI 1.29 to 11.95), (2) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) <80% predicted (OR=3.91, 95% CI 1.30 to 11.78), and (3) presence of varicose or cystic bronchiectasis (OR=4.80, 95% CI 1.11 to 21.46). Clinically stable patients with bronchiectasis have a high prevalence of bronchial colonisation by PPMs. Sputum culture is a good alternative to bronchoscopic procedures for evaluation of this colonisation. Early diagnosis of bronchiectasis, presence of varicose-cystic bronchiectasis, and FEV1 <80% predicted appear to be risk factors for bronchial colonisation with PPMs.
    Thorax 02/2002; 57(1):15-9. · 8.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the bronchial inflammatory response and its relationship to bacterial colonization in bronchiectasis, we performed a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in 49 patients in stable clinical condition and in nine control subjects. BAL was processed for differential cell count, quantitative bacteriologic cultures, and measurement of inflammatory mediators. An increase was observed in the percentage of neutrophils (37 [0 to 98]) (median[range]) versus 1[0 to 4]%, p = 0.01), in the concentration of elastase (90.5 [8 to 2,930] versus 34 [9 to 44], p = 0.03), myeloperoxidase (9.1 [0 to 376] versus 0.3 [0.1 to 1.4], p = 0.01), and in the levels of TNF-alpha (4 [0 to 186] versus 0 [0 to 7], p = 0.03), IL-8 (195 [0 to 5,520] versus 3 [0 to 31], p = 0.001), and IL-6 (6 [0 to 115] versus 0 [0 to 3], p = 0.001) in patients with bronchiectasis compared with control subjects. Noncolonized patients showed a more intense bronchial inflammatory reaction than did control subjects. This inflammatory reaction was exaggerated in patients colonized by microorganisms with potential pathogenicity (MPP), with a clear relationship with the bronchial bacterial load. Patients with bronchiectasis showed a slight systemic inflammatory response, with poor correlations between systemic and bronchial inflammatory mediators, suggesting that the inflammatory process was mostly compartmentalized. We conclude that patients with bronchiectasis in a stable clinical condition present an active neutrophilic inflammation in the airways that is exaggerated by the presence of MPP, and the higher the bacterial load the more intense the inflammation.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 12/2001; 164(9):1628-32. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The high incidence and mortality rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) mandate an early and aggressive assessment of the clinical evolution in order to detect the causes of nonresponse to empirical antibiotic treatment. Persistence of the initial clinical manifestations (fever, purulent tracheal secretion, leukocytosis), progression of the radiographic infiltrate, or lack of improvement of the gas exchange are the main criteria to define the failure to respond to treatment, at 72 hours of evolution. Monitoring other parameters of organ dysfunction, such as creatinine, bilirubin, and platelet count, may be useful for detecting and correcting concomitant disorders. The first approach to the nonresponding patient with VAP should be the evaluation of the spectrum and dosage of the antibiotic treatment. Resistant strains (i.e., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) or unusual microorganisms (fungi, Legionella, cytomegalovirus), which are not covered by the routine therapy, need to be taken into account. Other concomitant infections should be considered in the case of persistent fever or systemic inflammatory response syndrome, such as sinusitis, empyema, lung abscess, vascular catheter-related sepsis, urinary infection, or abdominal sepsis. Other noninfectious conditions could mimic or complicate VAP, such as acute respiratory distress, atelectasis, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, drug-related fever, or postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema. Investigations to be performed in nonresponding patients with VAP must be directed toward the diagnosis of these alternative conditions, and should rely on bronchoscopy, ultrasound, CT scan, echocardiography, and pulmonary scintigraphy.
    Clinical Pulmonary Medicine 08/2001; 8(5):290-295.
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    ABSTRACT: The development of pulmonary infiltrates is a frequent life threatening complication in immunocompromised patients, requiring early diagnosis and specific treatment. In the present study non-invasive and bronchoscopic diagnostic techniques were applied in patients with different non-HIV immunocompromised conditions to determine the aetiology of the pulmonary infiltrates and to evaluate the impact of these methods on therapeutic decisions and outcome in this population. The non-invasive diagnostic methods included serological tests, blood antigen detection, and blood, nasopharyngeal wash (NPW), sputum and tracheobronchial aspirate (TBAS) cultures. Bronchoscopic techniques included fibrobronchial aspirate (FBAS), protected specimen brush (PSB), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Two hundred consecutive episodes of pulmonary infiltrates were prospectively evaluated during a 30 month period in 52 solid organ transplant recipients, 53 haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, 68 patients with haematological malignancies, and 27 patients requiring chronic treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. An aetiological diagnosis was obtained in 162 (81%) of the 200 patients. The aetiology of the pulmonary infiltrates was infectious in 125 (77%) and non-infectious in 37 (23%); 38 (19%) remained undiagnosed. The main infectious aetiologies were bacterial (48/125, 24%), fungal (33/125, 17%), and viral (20/125, 10%), and the most frequent pathogens were Aspergillus fumigatus (n=29), Staphylococcus aureus (n=17), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=12). Among the non-infectious aetiologies, pulmonary oedema (16/37, 43%) and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (10/37, 27%) were the most common causes. Non-invasive techniques led to the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in 41% of the cases in which they were used; specifically, the diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 30/191 (16%); sputum cultures 27/88 (31%); NPW 9/50 (18%); and TBAS 35/55 (65%). Bronchoscopic techniques led to the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in 59% of the cases in which they were used: FBAS 16/28 (57%), BAL 68/135 (51%), and PSB 30/125 (24%). The results obtained with the different techniques led to a change in antibiotic treatment in 93 cases (46%). Although changes in treatment did not have an impact on the overall mortality, patients with pulmonary infiltrates of an infectious aetiology in whom the change was made during the first 7 days had a better outcome (29% mortality) than those in whom treatment was changed later (71% mortality; p=0.001). Non-invasive and bronchoscopic procedures are useful techniques for the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. Bronchial aspirates (FBAS and TBAS) and BAL have the highest diagnostic yield and impact on therapeutic decisions.
    Thorax 06/2001; 56(5):379-87. · 8.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the incidence, etiology, and outcome of pulmonary infiltrates (PIs) in HIV-infected patients and to evaluate the yield of diagnostic procedures. Prospective observational study of consecutive hospital admissions. Tertiary hospital. HIV-infected patients with new-onset radiologic PIs from April 1998 to March 1999. The study protocol included chest radiography, blood and sputum cultures, serologic testing for "atypical" causes of pneumonia, testing for Legionella urinary antigen, testing for cytomegalovirus antigenemia, and bronchoscopy in case of diffuse or progressive PIs. One hundred two episodes in 92 patients were recorded. The incidence of PIs was 18 episodes per 100 hospital admission-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15-21). An etiologic diagnosis was achieved in 62 cases (61%). Bacterial pneumonia (BP), Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), and mycobacteriosis were the main diagnoses. The incidences of BP and mycobacteriosis were not statistically different in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) versus non-HAART patients. The incidence of PCP was lower in those receiving HAART (p =.011), however. Nine patients died (10%). Independent factors associated with higher mortality were mechanical ventilation (odds ratio [OR] = 83; CI: 4.2-1,682), age >50 years (OR = 23; CI: 2-283), and not having an etiologic diagnosis (OR = 22; CI: 1.6-293). Pulmonary infiltrates are still a frequent cause of hospital admission in the HAART era, and BP is the main etiology. There was no difference in the rate of BP and mycobacteriosis in HAART and non-HAART patients. Not having an etiologic diagnosis is an independent factor associated with mortality.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 05/2001; 27(1):35-43. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy with protease inhibitors in 1996 has changed the morbidity and mortality of acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients. Therefore, the aetiologies and prognostic factors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with life-threatening respiratory failure requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission need to be reassessed. From 1993 to 1998, we prospectively evaluated 57 HIV patients (mean+/-SEM age 36.5+/-1.3 yrs) admitted to the ICU showing pulmonary infiltrates and acute respiratory failure. A total of 21 and 30 patients were diagnosed as having Pneumocystis carinii and bacterial pneumonia, respectively, of whom 13 and eight died during their ICU stay (p=0.01). Both groups of patients had similar age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, and severity in respiratory failure. The number of cases with bacterial pneumonia admitted to ICU decreased after 1996 (p=0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that (APACHE) II score >17, serum albumin level <25 g.(-1), and diagnosis of P. carinii pneumonia were the only factors at entry associated with ICU mortality (p=0.02). Patients with bacterial pneumonia are less frequently admitted to the intensive care unit after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy with protease inhibitors in 1996. Compared to the previous series, it was observed that the few Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia patients that need intensive care still have a bad prognosis.
    European Respiratory Journal 01/2001; 17(1):87-93. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to assess the potential role of glucocorticoids (GC) in modulating systemic and pulmonary inflammatory responses in mechanically ventilated patients with severe pneumonia. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients with pneumonia treated at a respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) of a 1,000-bed teaching hospital were prospectively studied. All patients had received prior antimicrobial treatment. Eleven patients received GC (mean+/-SD dose of i.v. methylprednisolone 677+/-508 mg for 9+/-7 days), mainly for bronchial dilatation. Serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and C-reactive protein levels were measured in all patients. The inflammatory response was attenuated in patients receiving GC, both systemically (IL-6 1,089+/-342 versus 630+/-385 pg x mL(-1), p=0.03; C-reactive protein 34+/-5 versus 19+/-5 mg x L(-1), p=0.04) and locally in BALF (TNF-alpha 118+/-50 versus 24+/-5 pg x mL(-1), p= 0.05; neutrophil count: 2.4+/-1.1 x 10(9) cells x L(-1) (93+/-3%) versus 1.9+/-1.8 x 10(9) cells x L(-1) (57+/-16%), p=0.03). Four of the 11 (36%) patients receiving GC died compared to six (67%) who were not receiving GC (p=0.37). The present pilot study suggests that glucocorticoids decrease systemic and lung inflammatory responses in mechanically ventilated patients with severe pneumonia receiving antimicrobial treatment.
    European Respiratory Journal 08/1999; 14(1):218-20. · 6.36 Impact Factor
  • A Torres, M el-Ebiary, A Rañó
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    ABSTRACT: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infectious respiratory complication in intensive care unit patients, particularly those needing mechanical ventilation. Ventilator-associated pneumonia represents a challenging problem in terms of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Nosocomial sinusitis is another respiratory infection, not uncommon in mechanically ventilated patients. This type of infection has to be suspected in nasally intubated patients and may be a hidden focus of fever and sepsis.
    Clinics in Chest Medicine 07/1999; 20(2):287-301, viii. · 2.07 Impact Factor
  • C Montón, A Rañó, A Torres
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 12/1998; 34 Suppl 2:11-6. · 1.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with haematological malignancies developing severe pulmonary complications have a poor outcome, especially after bone-marrow transplantation (BMT). We studied the aetiology, the yield of different diagnostic tools, as well as the outcome and prognostic factors in the corresponding population admitted to our respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). Overall, 89 patients with haematological malignancies and pulmonary complications treated within a 10 yr period were included. The underlying malignancies were predominantly acute leukaemia and chronic myeloid leukaemia (66/89, 74%). Fifty-two of 89 (58%) patients were bone marrow recipients. An aetiological diagnosis could be obtained in 61/89 (69%) of cases. The aetiology was infectious in 37/89 (42%) and noninfectious in 24/89 (27%). Blood cultures and cytological examinations of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were the diagnostic tools with the highest yield (13/43 (30%) and 13/45 (29%) positive results, respectively). Necropsy results were coincident with results obtained during the lifetime in 43% of cases with infectious and 60% with noninfectious aetiologies. Overall mortality was 70/89 (79%), and 47/52 (90%) in transplant recipients. The requirement of mechanical ventilation, BMT, and an interval <90 days of BMT prior to ICU admission were independent adverse prognostic factors. The outcome in this patient population was uniformly poor. It was worst in bone marrow recipients developing pulmonary complications <90 days after transplantation and requiring mechanical ventilation. Decisions about intensive care unit admission and mech-anical ventilation should seriously consider the dismal prognosis of these patients.
    European Respiratory Journal 07/1998; 12(1):116-22. · 6.36 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

567 Citations
98.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2009
    • Hospital Clínic de Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2006
    • IDIBAPS August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2005
    • Hospital Universitari Mutua de Terrassa
      Terrassa, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2004
    • University of Barcelona
      • Departament de Medicina
      Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
    • ALTHAIA, Xarxa Assistencial Universitària de Manresa
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain