A I Ortiz Chercoles

University of Alcalá, Cómpluto, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (8)14.56 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction and objectives The influence on the size of radiofrequency lesions by cooling of the tip of the electrode remains unclear. Moreover, the possible effects of two different cooling systems, closed and open, have not been well differentiated. We designed this study to compare both systems of irrigated-tip catheters and the lesions produced with standard 4 mm catheters and also to evaluate the pathological and biochemical marker release correlation (cardiac troponin I) in an experimental model. Methods The study was performed in 20 pigs. Applying between 1-8 radiofrequency pulses, at a power of 15, 25 or 50 watts, for 15-60 seconds to each animal. After 7 days, the pigs were sacrificed for anatomopathological study. Results A total of 54 lesions were produced, 25 with standard catheters and 29 with irrigated catheters. The mean volume of the lesions produced with standard catheters was 146 ± 110 ml and with irrigated-tip catheters 856 ± 864 ml (p < 0.001). Peak values of cardiac troponin I were also higher for irrigated catheters (18 ± 15 ng/ml) than for standard (6.5 ± 3 ng/ml). The correlation between the size of the lesion and the levels of cardiac troponin I were 0.86 and 0.79 with the standard and irrigated-tip catheters, respectively. The incidence of cratering was higher with standard catheters (60%) than with irrigated (27%). Conclusions The lesions produced with an irrigated catheter are greater than those observed with standard catheters. The mean peak value of postablation cardiac troponin demonstrate a good correlation with the real size of the necrosis.
    Revista Española de Cardiología. 07/2013; 53(10):1347–1355.
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    ABSTRACT: Experimental studies have shown that deeper and wider lesions (up to 10 mm long or deep) can be safely created using an 8 mm or irrigated tip catheter for ablation to treat atrial flutter. However, potential damage to the tricuspid valve or inferior cava vein has not been systematically evaluated. The cavotricuspid isthmus was ablated in 26 pigs (body weight 26-52 kg), with a total of 187 radiofrequency pulses. Standard 4 mm, 8 mm and irrigated tip catheters were used at random. For each ablation, energy, impedance and temperature were recorded continuously. The lesions were larger with irrigated tip and 8-mm catheters than with standard ones. In 7 animals (1 with an irrigated tip, 4 with an 8-mm, and 2 with a standard tip) the tricuspid valve was damaged. The tricuspid valve was severely damaged in 3 pigs and lesions were moderate in 4. In animals with tricuspid valve lesions, maximal energy was higher (59 +/- 27 vs. 51 +/- 24 W; p=0,03) and higher temperatures were reached (63 +/- 4 vs. 55 +/- 11 degrees C; p<0.001). Low energy pulses measured before ablation were also more intense in animals in which damage was produced (0.55 +/- 0.24 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.29; p=0.001), indicating greater contact pressure. The tricuspid valve may be severely damaged during the ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus for atrial flutter: damage was seen most often with high energy pulses and with 8-mm catheters, but can also occur with usual energy levels and standard catheters. To minimize damage this technique should not be used from the inside of the right ventricle just above the tricuspid valve.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 10/2003; 56(10):963-70. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and objectives Experimental studies have shown that deeper and wider lesions (up to 10 mm long or deep) can be safely created using an 8 mm or irrigated tip catheter for ablation to treat atrial flutter. However, potential damage to the tricuspid valve or inferior cava vein has not been systematically evaluated. Patients and method The cavotricuspid isthmus was ablated in 26 pigs (body weight 26-52 kg), with a total of 187 radiofrequency pulses. Standard 4 mm, 8 mm and irrigated tip catheters were used at random. For each ablation, energy, impedance and temperature were recorded continuously. Results The lesions were larger with irrigated tip and 8-mm catheters than with standard ones. In 7 animals (1 with an irrigated tip, 4 with an 8-mm, and 2 with a standard tip) the tricuspid valve was damaged. The tricuspid valve was severely damaged in 3 pigs and lesions were moderate in 4. In animals with tricuspid valve lesions, maximal energy was higher (59 ± 27 vs. 51 ± 24 W; p = 0,03) and higher temperatures were reached (63 ± 4 vs. 55 ± 11 °C; p < 0.001). Low energy pulses measured before ablation were also more intense in animals in which damage was produced (0.55 ± 0.24 vs. 0.35 ± 0.29; p = 0.001), indicating greater contact pressure. Conclusions The tricuspid valve may be severely damaged during the ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus for atrial flutter: damage was seen most often with high energy pulses and with 8-mm catheters, but can also occur with usual energy levels and standard catheters. To minimize damage this technique should not be used from the inside of the right ventricle just above the tricuspid valve.
    Revista Espanola De Cardiologia - REV ESPAN CARDIOL. 01/2003; 56(10):963-970.
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    ABSTRACT: We performed this study to evaluate the security and efficacy in the lesions produced on the atrial wall by different irrigated catheters in an experimental model. We evaluated the anatomopathologic characteristics of the lesions produced by two different systems of irrigated tip catheters, with opened or closed circuit. This study was performed in 16 pigs applying 60 sec radiofrequency pulses with three different energy levels (15, 25 y 50 Watts). Two different systems of radiofrequency ablation irrigated catheters were used, opened and closed. We used 4 pigs in which we performed ablation with a standard catheter as a control group. Under fluoroscopic guidance, catheters were placed on the high and low right atrial lateral wall, where lesions were produced. After 7 days, animals were sacrificed for anatomopathological study. A total of 27 lesions were performed with irrigated catheters (11 closed circuit and 16 opened) and 6 with standard catheters in the control group. We did not find significant differences in the lesion characteristics between the two different systems of irrigated tip catheter used, nevertheless lesions performed with the closed system were slightly greater. Th lesions produced with irrigated catheters were always superior in the control group. Transmurality in the free atrial wall is frequent with both systems. We did not see any perforation in the atrial wall. We did not find significant differences in the size of the lesions produced with the two systems of irrigated catheters used. These data from an experimental model can provide useful information for atrial tachycardia radiofrequency ablation procedures in humans.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 12/2001; 54(11):1283-6. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a subset of patients with failed ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) using standard catheters and with 10% of the patients having recurrences. The purpose of this study was to compare the cooled and standard ablation with regard to acute successful electrophysiological achievement of bidirectional isthmus block and the subacute anatomic characteristics of the lesions. This randomized, experimental study compares the effects of ablation on the isthmus using a cooled catheter with those of a standard ablation catheter in 16 pigs. In 12 animals, CTI block was achieved after ablation (8/8 cooled and 4/8 standard). In two animals, it was not possible to achieve complete isthmus block and two had persistent slow conduction (all four using the standard catheter). After 1 week, the animals were slaughtered. The size of the lesion was greater with the irrigated tip catheters. Transmural lesions were found in 14 animals. A complete line of anatomic isthmus block was not documented after thefirst line in six animals, four with the standard and two with the cooled catheter. A conduction block was never present across gaps > or = 5 mm. In conclusion cooled catheters achieved a complete line of electrophysiological and anatomical block in a significantly higher percentage than the standard catheters.
    Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology 11/2001; 24(10):1525-33. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The right coronary artery (RCA) is found in the AV groove, just below the ablation target of atrial flutter, the cavotricuspid isthmus (ICT). After radiofrequency (RF) ablation with standard catheters, there have been no reports of complications, but it may not be successful in 10% of the cases. However, the use of irrigated tip catheters, which create deeper lesions, might potentially damage the coronary tree. We analyzed the effects of ICT RF ablation on the coronary tree, with macroscopic and microscopic anatomopathological study. Ablation on ICT was performed using an irrigated tip catheter in 16 pigs and was randomly compared with a standard ablation catheter. There were no clinical problems, modifications of ST or new arrhythmias during the ablation. The heart was extracted at 1 week. The macroscopic study demonstrated that the right coronary artery was preserved, along the ICT, surrounded by the epicardial fat. The microscopic study showed an inflammatory reaction in the epicardial fat that reached the adventitia of the coronary artery, but never produced necrosis in 14 cases. The muscular wall of the artery had signs of focal inflammation without endothelium involvement in 2 cases. However, we found a subepicardial vein completely damaged by the radiofrequency. Although the right coronary artery is located just below the isthmus, no necrosis was observed in any case. However, there was an inflammatory reaction that focally reached the muscular wall. The veins may be damaged in RF ablation, perhaps due to the different blood flow of each vessel.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 07/2001; 54(6):693-702. · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The influence on the size of radiofrequency lesions by cooling of the tip of the electrode remains unclear. Moreover, the possible effects of two different cooling systems, closed and open, have not been well differentiated. We designed this study to compare both systems of irrigated-tip catheters and the lesions produced with standard 4 mm catheters and also to evaluate the pathological and biochemical marker release correlation (cardiac troponin I) in an experimental model. The study was performed in 20 pigs. Applying between 1-8 radiofrequency pulses, at a power of 15, 25 or 50 watts, for 15-60 seconds to each animal. After 7 days, the pigs were sacrificed for anatomopathological study. A total of 54 lesions were produced, 25 with standard catheters and 29 with irrigated catheters. The mean volume of the lesions produced with standard catheters was 146 +/- 110 microl and with irrigated-tip catheters 856 +/- 864 microl (p < 0.001). Peak values of cardiac troponin I were also higher for irrigated catheters (18 +/- 15 ng/ml) than for standard (6.5 +/- 3 ng/ml). The correlation between the size of the lesion and the levels of cardiac troponin I were 0.86 and 0.79 with the standard and irrigated-tip catheters, respectively. The incidence of cratering was higher with standard catheters (60%) than with irrigated (27%). The lesions produced with an irrigated catheter are greater than those observed with standard catheters. The mean peak value of postablation cardiac troponin demonstrate a good correlation with the real size of the necrosis.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 10/2000; 53(10):1347-55. · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction and objectives The right coronary artery (RCA) is found in the AV groove, just below the ablation target of atrial flutter, the cavotricuspid isthmus (ICT). After radiofrequency (RF) ablation with standard catheters, there have been no reports of complications, but it may not be successful in 10% of the cases. However, the use of irrigated tip catheters, which create deeper lesions, might potentially damage the coronary tree. Methods We analyzed the effects of ICT RF ablation on the coronary tree, with macroscopic and microscopic anatomopathological study. Ablation on ICT was performed using an irrigated tip catheter in 16 pigs and was randomly compared with a standard ablation catheter. There were no clinical problems, modifications of ST or new arrhythmias during the ablation. The heart was extracted at 1 week. Results The macroscopic study demonstrated that the right coronary artery was preserved, along the ICT, surrounded by the epicardial fat. The microscopic study showed an inflammatory reaction in the epicardial fat that reached the adventitia of the coronary artery, but never produced necrosis in 14 cases. The muscular wall of the artery had signs of focal inflammation without endothelium involvement in 2 cases. However, we found a subepicardial vein completely damaged by the radiofrequency. Conclusions Although the right coronary artery is located just below the isthmus, no necrosis was observed in any case. However, there was an inflammatory reaction that focally reached the muscular wall. The veins may be damaged in RF ablation, perhaps due to the different blood flow of each vessel.
    Revista Española de Cardiología. 54(6):693–702.

Publication Stats

21 Citations
14.56 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2013
    • University of Alcalá
      • Department of Medicine and Medical Specialties
      Cómpluto, Madrid, Spain
  • 2001
    • Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain