Ann Finlinson

National Development and Research Institutes, Inc., New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (7)10.02 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study examines factors related to injection and noninjection drug use during the last incarceration among injection drug users in East Harlem, New York (n = 555), and Bayamón, Puerto Rico (n = 241). Injecting drugs during the last incarceration episode was more likely in the sample in Puerto Rico (31% vs. 12%, p < .001), and noninjection drug use was more likely in the New York sample (37% vs. 14%, p < .001). Gang affiliation and length of incarceration were related to injection and noninjection drug use. Interventions for incarcerated drug users, including harm reduction efforts and drug treatment programs, should be enhanced. Further study of the role of gangs in influencing inmate HIV risk behaviors should be undertaken.
    The Prison Journal 09/2005; 85(3):329-342. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We compared injection-related HIV risk behaviors of Puerto Rican current injection drug users (IDUs) living in New York City and in Puerto Rico who also had injected in the other location with those who had not. We recruited Puerto Rican IDUs in New York City (n = 561) and in Puerto Rico (n = 312). Of the former, 39% were "newcomers," having previously injected in Puerto Rico; of the latter, 14% were "returnees," having previously injected in New York. We compared risk behaviors within each sample between those with and without experience injecting in the other location. Newcomers reported higher levels of risk behaviors than other New York IDUs. Newcomer status (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.62) and homelessness (adjusted OR = 2.52) were significant predictors of "shooting gallery" use; newcomer status also predicted paraphernalia sharing (adjusted OR = 1.67). Returnee status was not related to these variables. Intervention services are needed that target mobile populations who are coming from an environment of high-risk behavior to one of low-risk behavior.
    American Journal of Public Health 06/2003; 93(5):812-6. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A dual site project was conducted to assess determinants of injection and sex-related risk behaviors among Puerto Rican drug users. The project focused on injection drug users and crack smokers, and was conducted in East Harlem, NY and Bayamón, PR in 1996-2000. Qualitative methods included ethnographic mapping, focus groups, in-depth interviews, and observations. A survey component (East Harlem, n = 800; Bayamón, n = 400) was also conducted. Procedures to ensure integration of methodologies and comparability of data were developed. This paper describes the qualitative and survey methods used, and presents the comparative HIV risk behaviors. The integration of the two methodologies served multiple functions: each component identified issues to be addressed in the other, enhanced cross-site comparability of data, and assisted in interpretation of findings. The survey data showed high levels of risk behaviors in both communities, with significantly higher levels of risk reported in Bayamón. Conducting studies of similar ethnic groups in different communities provides opportunities to examine diverse sources of influence on risk behaviors. The integration of qualitative and quantitative methods can enhance comparability and understanding of findings, particularly when there are differences in behaviors between communities.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 02/2003; 38(1):1-24. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Puerto Rican drug users both in New York and Puerto Rico have disproportionately high rates of HIV/AIDS. This paper derives findings from the ARIBBA Project—a dual site study of HIV risk behaviour determinants among Puerto Rican injection drug users and crack smokers, conducted in East Harlem, NY and Bayamón, PR. Qualitative data collected in focus groups, interviews and observations revealed significant diVerences in sexual risk behaviours, perceptions of risks and cultural/behavioural norms between the two locations, which were supported by the results of a survey of 1200 drug users. Recommendations are made for enhancing HIV risk reduction eVorts in both communities.
    Culture Health & Sexuality 01/2003; 5:19-35. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study assesses whether injection risk behaviors (e.g., syringe sharing and sharing injection paraphernalia) can be understood using a model that highlights drug related peer beliefs and role strain/deprivation. Data were collected on 561 Puerto Rican injection drug users in New York and 313 in Puerto Rico. A drug peer beliefs scale and three indicators of role strain were used with other control variables in a hierarchical multiple logistic regression model. Both aspects of the model were significant predictors of HIV risk behaviors in New York, but only role strain was a significant predictor for injection drug users (IDUs) in Puerto Rico. Individual-based paradigms should incorporate peer beliefs and role strain/deprivation in order to reduce HIV risk behaviors.
    Journal of drug issues 01/2003; 33(4):963-982. · 0.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes and compares distributions of drug-scene roles, frequency of engaging in role behaviors, and relationships of role-holding to high-risk behaviors and sexual partnerships among Puerto Rican injection drug users in New York and Puerto Rico. For this study 561 street-recruited injection drug users in East Harlem, New York, and 312 in Bayamón, Puerto Rico were asked the number of days (in the last 30) in which they earned money or drugs in each of seven drug-scene roles; and about behaviors and egocentric risk partner characteristics in the last 30 days. East Harlem subjects were more likely to get resources by selling drugs and syringes, and buying drugs for someone else; Bayamón subjects were more likely to be "hit doctors," buy needles for others, operate a shooting gallery, or escort others to shooting galleries. All roles were part-time except shooting gallery management in East Harlem. About 27% of respondents at each site engaged in two or more roles. Many roles were associated with increased odds of injecting more than twice a day, receptive syringe sharing, distributive syringe sharing, receptive paraphernalia sharing, and having a drug-injecting sex partner. Drug-scene role structures vary between cities. Most roles are part-time pursuits. Role-holders have higher-risk behaviors and sexual partnerships than other drug injectors. Although further research is needed, drug-scene role-holders should be targeted for interventions to affect their own risk and their communications with others.
    Journal of psychoactive drugs 01/2002; 34(4):363-9. · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article investigates the association between residential status and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors among island and New York Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs). We assigned 561 subjects from New York City and 312 from Puerto Rico to five residential status categories: living in parent's home, living in own home, living in other's home, living in temporary housing (hotel, single-room occupancy [SRO] hotels), and homeless (living in streets/shelters). Dependent variables included injection- and sex-related risk behaviors (sharing syringes, sharing other injection paraphernalia, shooting gallery use, and having paid sex). Chi square, t tests, and multivariate logistic analysis tests were performed separately by site. About one-quarter of the sample in each site was homeless. Island Puerto Ricans were more likely to live with their parents (44% vs. 12%, p <. 001), and more New York IDUs lived in their own home (30% vs. 14%, p <. 001). In New York, gallery use and paid sex were associated with living in other's home, living in parent's home, and being homeless. Sharing paraphernalia was related to living in other's home, living in temporary housing, and being homeless. In Puerto Rico, having paid sex was associated with homelessness. High-risk behaviors were more likely among homeless IDUs in both sites. Programs to provide housing and target outreach and other prevention programs for homeless IDUs would be helpful in reducing HIV risk.
    The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 11/2001; 27(4):719-735. · 1.55 Impact Factor