Yong-Un Han

Seoul National University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (9)3.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mg-Al layered double hydroxide was entrapped in calcium alginate beads (LDH-alginate beads) for phosphate removal. A field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), combined with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and an X-ray diffractometer, were used to analyze the properties of LDH-alginate beads. Batch and flow-through column experiments were performed to examine phosphate removal in LDH-alginate beads. FESEM images show that the cross-sectional surface of LDH-alginate beads was heterogeneous in surface topography, and LDH powders were intermingled with alginate polymers. Experimental results indicate that Mg-Al LDH-alginate beads are effective in the removal of phosphate. Batch experiments indicate that phosphate removal in 8% LDH-alginate beads was not sensitive to initial solution pHs between 4.9 and 8.9. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that phosphate removal reached equilibrium around 12 h of reaction time. Column experiments show that the removal capacity of 8% LDH-alginate beads was two orders of magnitude greater than that of pure alginate beads.
    Desalination and water treatment 01/2011; 36:178-186. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Column experiments were performed to investigate the effect of ionic strength on the attachment and detachment of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 10537 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 in aluminum-coated quartz sand. Results showed that the average mass recovery decreased from 80.7 to 45.3% in quartz sand and remained constant in aluminum-coated sand with increasing ionic concentrations of sodium chloride solution from 1 to 100 mmol/L. As the ionic concentrations of leaching solution changed from 100 to 0.1 mmol/L, average mass recovery of 39.1% was obtained from quartz sand (bacterial release), but no detachment was observed from aluminum-coated sand. This lack of detachment can be attributed to inner-sphere complexes between bacteria and aluminum-coated sand, which are minimally affected by ionic strength. This research indicates that aluminum-coated sand has advantages over quartz sand in bacteria removal in water filtration systems.
    Water Environment Research 06/2010; 82(6):499-505. · 1.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Column experiments were performed in this study to investigate humic acid adhesion to iron oxide-coated sand (ICS) under different experimental conditions including influent humic acid concentration, flow rate, solution pH, and ionic strength/composition. Breakthrough curves of humic acid were obtained by monitoring effluents, and then column capacity for humic acid adsorption (), total adsorption percent (R), and mass of humic acid adsorbed per unit mass of filter media () were quantified from these curves. Results showed that humic acid adhesion was about seven times higher in ICS than in quartz sand at given experimental conditions. This indicates that humic acid removal can be enhanced through the surface charge modification of quartz sand with iron oxide coating. The adhesion of humic acid in ICS was influenced by influent humic acid concentration. and increased while R decreased with increasing influent humic acid concentration in ICS column. However, the influence of flow rate was not eminent in our experimental conditions. The humic acid adhesion was enhanced with increasing salt concentration of solution. , and R increased in ICS column with increasing salt concentration. On the adhesion of humic acid, the impact of CaCl2 was greater than that of NaCl. Also, the humic acid adhesion to ICS decreased with increasing solution pH. , and R decreased with increasing solution pH. This study demonstrates that humic acid concentration, salt concentration/composition, and solution pH should be controlled carefully in order to improve the ICS column performance for humic acid removal from water.
    Environmental Engineering Research. 01/2009; 14(1):41-47.
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    Environmental Engineering Research. 01/2009; 14(3):164-169.
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the influence of oxyanions (nitrate, carbonate, phosphate) on the attachment of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) to Al-Fe bimetallic oxide-coated sand using column experiments. Results showed that bacterial attachment to the coated sand was independent of nitrate concentration. Bacterial mass recovery remained constant (10.90.2%) with varying nitrate concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 mM). In case of carbonate, mass recovery increased from 25.6% to 39.0% with increasing carbonate concentration from 0.1 mM to 1 mM, and mass recovery also increased from 50.9% to 78.9% at the same concentration condition in case of phosphate. This phenomenon could be attributed to the hindrance effect of carbonate and phosphate to bacterial attachment to the coated sand. Meanwhile, with increasing carbonate/phosphate concentration from 1 mM to 10 mM, mass recovery decreased from 39.0% to 23.8% and from 78.9% to 52.6%, respectively. This phenomenon could be ascribed to the enhancement effect of free carbonate/phosphate ions present in solution phase due to increasing carbonate/phosphate concentration, which increase ionic strength and thus enhance bacterial attachment to the coated sand. In our experimental conditions, the effect of phosphate to bacterial attachment to the coated sand was the greatest among phosphate, carbonate, and nitrate.
    Journal of Korean Society of Environmental Engineers. 01/2009; 31(7).
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ionic strength and iron impregnation on the attachment of Enterococcus faecalis to granular activated carbon (GAC). Column experiments were performed to examine bacterial adhesion to coconutbased GAC (c-GAC), iron-impregnated c-GAC (fc-GAC), acid-washed c-GAC (a-GAC) and iron-impregnated a-GAC (fa-GAC) under two different solution (NaCl 1, 10 mM) conditions. Results showed that bacterial mass recovery in c-GAC decreased from 77.3 to 61.6% while in a-GAC it decreased from 71.6 to 32.3% with increasing ionic strength from 1 to 10 mM. This indicates that bacterial attachment to GAC can be enhanced with increasing ionic strength. Results also showed that the mass recoveries in fc-GAC were 62.6% (1 mM) and 53.3% (10 mM) while they were 50.8% (1 mM) and 16.9%(10 mM) in fa-GAC, which were lower than those in c-GAC and a-GAC. This demonstrates that bacterial adhesion to GAC can be enhanced through iron impregnation. This study provides information regarding the effects of ionic strength and iron impregnation on bacterial attachment to GAC. Furthermore, this study will advance our knowledge of bacterial removal in surface-modified granular media.
    Journal of Korean Society of Environmental Engineers. 01/2009; 31(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the influence of ionic strength on the adhesion and release of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus) in quartz and iron-coated sands using column experiments. Results show that the mass recovery remained constant (E. coli = 13.70.5%, B. subtilis = 9.81.3%, S. aureus = 13.02.1%) in iron-coated sand while it decreased from 80.7 to 45.3% (S. aureus) in quartz sand with increasing ionic concentrations from 1 to 100 mM. As the ionic concentrations of leaching solution was lowered from 100 to 0.1 mM, average 39.1% of bacterial detachment was quantified from quartz sand, but no bacterial release was observed in iron-coated sand. The phenomenon observed in iron-coated sand can be attributed to the inner-sphere complexes between bacteria and coated sand, which have minimal effect from ionic strength. This study improves our knowledge regarding the bacterial interaction with surface-modified porous media.
    Journal of Korean Society of Environmental Engineers. 01/2009; 31(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Column experiments were performed in this study to investigate the influence of ionic strength on the mass recovery of Escherichia coli in iron-coated sand. The first set of the experiments was performed in the coated sand under various NaCl concentrations. The second experiments were carried out in the coated sand under various NaCl concentrations with a fixed phosphate concentration. Bacterial mass recoveries were quantified from breakthrough curves. The mass recoveries were compared with those obtained from the experiments in quartz sand under the same ionic strength/composition. Experimental results show that the mass recovery in quartz sand decreased from 76.7 to 9.2% with increasing effective ionic strength (I(e)) from 0 to 149.4 mM using NaCl. In the coated sand, however, the mass recovery remained constant in the range between 2.7 and 3.7% even though I(e) increased in the same range. This indicates that bacterial adhesion to the coated sand may not be affected by ionic strength in the presence of NaCl. Results also illustrate that the mass recovery in quartz sand decreased from 64.7 to 13.3% with increasing I(e) from 0.97 to 149.6 mM using NaCl under a fixed phosphate concentration (0.97 mM as I(e)). In the coated sand, the mass recovery increased sharply to 58.5% in 0.97 mM phosphate concentration compared to the case in deionized water (3.0%). This indicates that in the coated sand bacterial mass recovery can increase due to the presence of phosphate. In addition, the mass recovery in the coated sand decreased from 58.5 to 6.7% with increasing I(e) from 0.97 to 149.6 mM using NaCl under a fixed phosphate concentration (0.97 mM as I(e)). This demonstrates that bacterial adhesion to the coated sand may be influenced by ionic strength in the presence of phosphate.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A 02/2008; 43(9):1108-14. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polyvinyl alcohol/alginate hydrogel beads containing Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH-PVA/alginate beads) were synthesized for phosphate removal. Results showed that blending PVA with the LDH-alginate beads significantly improved their stability in a phos-phate solution. The kinetic reaction in LDH-PVA/alginate beads reached equilibrium at 12 hr-post reaction with 99.2% removal. The amount of phosphate removed at equilibrium (q e) was determined to be 0.389 mgP/g. The equilibrium data were described well by the Freundlich isotherm with the distribution coefficient (K F , 0.638) and the constant (n, 0.396). Phosphate removal in LDH-PVA/alginate beads was not sensitive to solution pH. Also, the removal capacity of LDH-PVA/alginate beads (q e , 1.543 mgP/g) was two orders of magnitude greater than that of PVA/alginate beads (q e , 0.016 mgP/g) in column experiments. This study demonstrates that LDH-PVA/ alginate beads with a higher chemical stability against phosphate compared to LDH-alginate beads have the potential for phosphate removal as adsorptive media.