Yann Berthelot

Institute of Biotechnology, Nagar, Rajasthan, India

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Publications (12)18.74 Total impact

  • Source
    Yann Berthelot · Bertin Trottier · Pierre Yves Robidoux
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    ABSTRACT: Bioavailability in heterogeneous media such as soils is a multi-factorial concept which ranges from soil chemistry to toxicity. The complexity of this factor has been tackled by various studies pinpointing its relevancy for laboratory to field extrapolation of toxicity data. As contaminant bioavailability on these sites is virtually unknown, a global assessment of this issue has been conducted on soils impacted by antitank firing from a Canadian Range and Training Area (RTA) and contaminated by energetic materials (EM) and metals. Yet, the descriptive results acquired from this survey require further in-depth analysis so as to enhance understanding of soil health status. Statistical models as well as an index integrating biomarker responses were derived from this database and are proposed as diagnostic, explanatory and possibly predictive tools for soil bioavailability and quality assessment. Relationships associating bioaccessible contaminant levels to soil properties allowed to clarify contaminant behaviour in energetic material (EM)-contaminated soils. Likewise, models expressing biomarker responses as a function of bioaccessible contaminant concentrations contributed to identify the contaminants causing toxicity in earthworms and to the comprehension of those toxic effects. The index of biomarker response was adapted from similar concepts applied in the aquatic environment and is an original contribution to terrestrial sites. The biomarker index data were in agreement with soil contamination profiles and represent therefore an interesting tool for soil quality appraisal. Such tools also offer a promising potential for the management of contaminated soils.
    Environment international 01/2009; DOI:10.1016/j.envint.2008.07.008 · 5.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bioavailability is critical for understanding effects that might result from exposure of biota to contaminated soils. Soils from military range and training areas (RTAs) are contaminated principally by energetic materials (EM) and metals. Their chemical characteristics are relatively well known and toxicity assessment of soils from RTAs are in some cases available. However, bioavailability on these sites needs to be comprehensively characterized. A holistic approach to bioavailability, incorporating both chemical and earthworm toxicological indicators, was applied to soils from an anti-tank firing range at a Canadian Forces Base. Results showed that HMX and the metals Zn, Pb, Bi and Cd, though not consistently the prevailing toxicants, were the most accessible to earthworms. Some metals (notably Cu, Zn, Cr and Bi) were also accumulated in earthworm tissue but those were not necessarily expected given their bioaccessibility (i.e., the chemical availability of contaminants in the environment for the organisms) at the beginning of the exposure. The tested soils impaired earthworm reproduction and reduced adult growth. Measurement of selected sublethal parameters indicated that lysosomal integrity (determined as the neutral red retention time--NRRT) was decreased, while elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity suggested that earthworms experienced oxidative stress. The correspondence between the NRRT and metal contamination pattern suggested that metals may be the main cause of lysosomal disruption in EM-contaminated soils. The approach to bioavailability appraisal adopted in this case appears to be a promising practice for site-specific assessment of contaminated land.
    Chemosphere 10/2008; 74(1):166-77. DOI:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.07.056 · 3.50 Impact Factor
  • Y Berthelot · � Valton · A Auroy · B Trottier · PY Robidoux
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    ABSTRACT: Bioavailability is critical for understanding effects that might result from exposure of biota to contaminated soils. Soils from military range and training areas (RTAs) are contaminated principally by energetic materials (EM) and metals. Their chemical characteristics are relatively well known and toxicity assessment of soils from RTAs are in some cases available. However, bioavailability on these sites needs to be comprehensively characterized. A holistic approach to bioavailability, incorporating both chemical and earthworm toxicological indicators, was applied to soils from an anti-tank firing range at a Canadian Forces Base. Results showed that HMX and the metals Zn, Pb, Bi and Cd, though not consistently the prevailing toxicants, were the most accessible to earthworms. Some metals (notably Cu, Zn, Cr and Bi) were also accumulated in earthworm tissue but those were not necessarily expected given their bioaccessibility (i.e., the chemical availability of contaminants in the environment for the organisms) at the beginning of the exposure. The tested soils impaired earthworm reproduction and reduced adult growth. Measurement of selected sublethal parameters indicated that lysosomal integrity (determined as the neutral red retention time – NRRT) was decreased, while elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity suggested that earthworms experienced oxidative stress. The correspondence between the NRRT and metal contamination pattern suggested that metals may be the main cause of lysosomal disruption in EM-contaminated soils. The approach to bioavailability appraisal adopted in this case appears to be a promising practice for site-specific assessment of contaminated land.
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    ABSTRACT: High metal (e.g., Pb) concentrations are typically found in explosive-contaminated soil, and their presence may increase, decrease, or not influence toxicity predicted on the basis of one explosive alone (e.g., HMX). Nevertheless, few data are available in the scientific literature for this type of multiple exposure. Soil organisms, such as earthworms, are one of the first receptors affected by the contamination of soil. Therefore, a reproductive study was conducted using Eisenia andrei in a forest-type soil. Both HMX and Pb decreased reproduction parameters (number of total cocoons, hatched cocoons, and surviving juveniles) individually. Based on the total number of cocoons, HMX was more toxic in a forest soil than Pb, with EC(50) of 31 mg kg(-1), and 1068 mg kg(-1), respectively. The slope of the concentration-response curve was significantly greater in the case of Pb, which is consistent with the possibility that the two compounds do not act on the same target site. The response-addition model was used to predict the response of earthworms and to test for interaction between the two contaminants. The predicted toxicity was not significantly different than the observed toxicity, implying that Pb and HMX were considered noninteractive compounds. The combined action of Pb-HMX may be described, therefore, as dissimilar-noninteractive joint action in a forest soil. The results illustrate the relevance of considering the presence of metals in the risk assessment of explosive-contaminated sites because metals can add their toxicity to explosives. Extension of this study to other types of soil and other metals would improve the understanding of toxicity at these sites.
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 11/2007; 53(3):351-8. DOI:10.1007/s00244-005-0139-z · 1.96 Impact Factor
  • K Savard · Y Berthelot · A Auroy · PA Spear · B Trottier · PY Robidoux
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    ABSTRACT: High metal (e.g., Pb) concentrations are typically found in explosive-contaminated soil, and their presence may increase, decrease, or not influence toxicity predicted on the basis of one explosive alone (e.g., HMX). Nevertheless, few data are available in the scientific literature for this type of multiple exposure. Soil organisms, such as earthworms, are one of the first receptors affected by the contamination of soil. Therefore, a reproductive study was conducted using Eisenia andrei in a forest-type soil. Both HMX and Pb decreased reproduction parameters (number of total cocoons, hatched cocoons, and surviving juveniles) individually. Based on the total number of cocoons, HMX was more toxic in a forest soil than Pb, with EC50 of 31 mg kg-1, and 1068 mg kg-1, respectively. The slope of the concentration-response curve was significantly greater in the case of Pb, which is consistent with the possibility that the two compounds do not act on the same target site. The response-addition model was used to predict the response of earthworms and to test for interaction between the two contaminants. The predicted toxicity was not significantly different than the observed toxicity, implying that Pb and HMX were considered noninteractive compounds. The combined action of Pb-HMX may be described, therefore, as dissimilar-noninteractive joint action in a forest soil. The results illustrate the relevance of considering the presence of metals in the risk assessment of explosive-contaminated sites because metals can add their toxicity to explosives. Extension of this study to other types of soil and other metals would improve the understanding of toxicity at these sites.
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: Monocyclic nitramine explosives such as 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) are toxic to a number of ecological receptors, including earthworms. The polycyclic nitramine CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) is a powerful explosive that may replace RDX and HMX, but its toxicity is not known. In the present study, the lethal and sublethal toxicities of CL-20 to the earthworm (Eisenia andrei) are evaluated. Two natural soils, a natural sandy forest soil (designated RacFor2002) taken in the Montreal area (QC, Canada; 20% organic carbon, pH 7.2) and a Sassafras sandy loam soil (SSL) taken on the property of U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (Edgewood, MD, USA; 0.33% organic carbon, pH 5.1), were used. Results showed that CL-20 was not lethal at concentrations of 125 mg/kg or less in the RacFor2002 soil but was lethal at concentrations of 90.7 mg/kg or greater in the SSL soil. Effects on the reproduction parameters such as a decrease in the number of juveniles after 56 d of exposure were observed at the initial CL-20 concentration of 1.6 mg/kg or greater in the RacFor2002 soil, compared to 0.2 mg/kg or greater in the SSL soil. Moreover, low concentrations of CL-20 in SSL soil (approximately 0.1 mg/kg; nominal concentration) were found to reduce the fertility of earthworms. Taken together, the present results show that CL-20 is a reproductive toxicant to the earthworm, with lethal effects at higher concentrations. Its toxicity can be decreased in soils favoring CL-20 adsorption (high organic carbon content).
    Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 05/2004; 23(4):1026-34. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Monocyclic nitramine explosives such as 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) are toxic to a number of ecological receptors, including earthworms. The polycyclic nitramine CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) is a powerful explosive that may replace RDX and HMX, but its toxicity is not known. In the present study, the lethal and sublethal toxicities of CL-20 to the earthworm (Eisenia andrei) are evaluated. Two natural soils, a natural sandy forest soil (designated RacFor2002) taken in the Montreal area (QC, Canada; 20% organic carbon, pH 7.2) and a Sassafras sandy loam soil (SSL) taken on the property of U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (Edgewood, MD, USA; 0.33% organic carbon, pH 5.1), were used. Results showed that CL-20 was not lethal at concentrations of 125 mg/kg or less in the RacFor2002 soil but was lethal at concentrations of 90.7 mg/kg or greater in the SSL soil. Effects on the reproduction parameters such as a decrease in the number of juveniles after 56 d of exposure were observed at the initial CL-20 concentration of 1.6 mg/kg or greater in the RacFor2002 soil, compared to 0.2 mg/kg or greater in the SSL soil. Moreover, low concentrations of CL-20 in SSL soil (apprx0.1 mg/kg; nominal concentration) were found to reduce the fertility of earthworms. Taken together, the present results show that CL-20 is a reproductive toxicant to the earthworm, with lethal effects at higher concentrations. Its toxicity can be decreased in soils favoring CL-20 adsorption (high organic carbon content).
    Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 04/2004; 23(4). DOI:10.1897/03-308 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bioaccumulation of cadmium, copper, and zinc was examined in common ragworms Hediste diversicolor from control (Bay of Somme, Blackwater) and metal-rich (Seine estuary, Boulogne harbor, Restronguet Creek) sites in France and the United Kingdom. The degree of exposure in the field was assessed by considering both total concentrations in superficial sediment and the quantities of metals which may be released in vitro at different pH levels. Among the three contaminated sites, release of the three metals was not detectable in Boulogne harbor, in correlation with limited enhancement of the metal concentrations in the common ragworms from this site. Even at those sites where zinc could be released in vitro from the sediment, zinc concentrations were not enhanced in common ragworms, in agreement with previous findings indicating that the body content of this metal is regulated in H. diversicolor. At all the studied sites, bioaccumulated zinc was mainly in cytosolic form. The distribution of cadmium and copper varied according to the origin of the common rag-worms, the insoluble fraction increasing with the degree of contamination (cadmium in the Restronguet Creek, copper in the Seine estuary, and even more in Restronguet Creek). In the cytosolic fraction, metals were partly linked to cytosolic heat-stable thiolic compounds (CHSTC) with molecular masses (5-6 kDa and about 12 kDa) consistent with metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP). Metal-binding to MTLP varied with the degree of contamination and with the metal studied. In contrast to many invertebrates, the presence of metal-binding CHSTC (MM about 2 kDa) other than MTLP seems to be a peculiar feature of H. diversicolor.
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 12/2003; 45(4):468-78. DOI:10.1007/s00244-003-0135-0 · 1.96 Impact Factor
  • PY Robidoux · F Leduc · K Savard · Y Berthelot · S Dodard · M Martel · J Hawari · GI Sunahara
  • Y Berthelot · B Trottier · PY Robidoux
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: In the framework of the Oslo convention, the first step of the assessment of the ecological risk induced by dredged contaminated sediments relies upon the determination of global concentrations of the most common contaminants. They are compared to guideline levels of contamination : under level 1, sediment-bound contaminants are considered as having negligible impact whereas above level 2 a possible negative impact must be envisaged. Paired sites, contaminated vs control, were investigated in the Gulf of Biscay and the Channel. Despite of concentrations well below level 1 (French regulation), sediments from Fier d'Ars showed toxicity towards mussel embryogenesis. On the contrary, Boulogne harbor sediments showed metal concentrations higher than level 2 but did not induce any additional metal accumulation in worms Hediste diversicolor compared to specimens from the Bay of Somme. This lack of effect has been explained by the low mobility of sediment-bound metals in Boulogne harbor.

Publication Stats

152 Citations
18.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2009
    • Institute of Biotechnology
      Nagar, Rajasthan, India
  • 2008
    • Université du Québec à Montréal
      • Department of Biological Sciences
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2003
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France