Tatiana P T Ferreira

Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Publications (8)36.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Instillation of silica into the lungs of rodents results in pathological changes that strongly mimic human silicosis, an occupational lung disease marked by restrictive airway obstruction, inflammation, and fibrosis. Because IL-13 is a pivotal proinflammatory and fibrogenic cytokine, we examined whether a recombinant immunotoxin comprised of human IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (IL-13-PE) might affect pathological features of experimental silicosis. Mice received a single intranasal instillation of silica particles and were treated with intranasal IL-13-PE every other day from days 21 to 27 postsilica. The sensitivity of putative cell targets to IL-13-PE was also assessed in in vitro settings. Upregulation of IL-13, its receptor subunits IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2, and shared receptor IL-4Rα were associated with development of granulomatous lung inflammation triggered by silica. IL-13-PE inhibited silica-induced granuloma and fibrotic responses noted at 24 h and 15 d after the last treatment. Upregulation of TNF-α, TGF-β, and chemokines, as well as increased collagen deposition and airway hyperreactivity to methacholine were all clearly sensitive to IL-13-PE. In addition, IL-13-PE inhibited both IL-13-induced proliferation of cultured lung fibroblasts from silicotic mice and silica-induced IL-8 generation from A549 cells. In conclusion, our findings show that therapeutic treatment with IL-13-PE can reverse important pathological features caused by inhalation of silica particles, suggesting that this recombinant immunotoxin is a promising molecular template in drug discovery for the treatment of silicosis.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fish oil (FO) is rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which have been suggested to be anti-inflammatory and are associated with improvement of several inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the influence of FO on allergen-induced lung inflammation and airway hyperreactivity in mice. Male A/J mice were fed either a standard-chow (SC) or a FO diet (FO) for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, each group was further randomized for ovalbumin (SC-OVA and FO-OVA) or saline (SC-SAL and FO-SAL) challenge. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine, 24h after the last challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for leukocyte counts. Lung tissue mucus deposition, peribronchiolar matrix deposition and eosinophil infiltration were quantified. Serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1 (ref 2.2), lung IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, INFγ and eotaxin-1 and 2 were detected by ELISA and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), GATA-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) expression was measured by Western blot. Levels of serum IgE and IgG1 were significantly higher in OVA sensitized mice. OVA challenge resulted in increased eosinophil infiltration, increased inflammatory cytokine production, peribronchiolar matrix and mucus deposition and airway hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine. Elevated lung NFκB and GATA-3 expression was noted in OVA-challenged mice. These changes were attenuated in mice fed with FO diet. Higher PPARγ expression was also detected in the lungs from the FO-fed groups. Our results demonstrate that FO intake attenuated classical asthma features by suppressing the systemic sensitization, thus providing evidence that FO might be a prophylactic alternative for asthma prevention.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(9):e75059. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that nebulized lidocaine is beneficial in asthma therapy, but to what extent and the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of lidocaine treatment using a murine model of allergic asthma characterized by expression of pivotal features of the disease: inflammation, mucus production, and lung remodeling. A/J mice sensitized with ovalbumin were treated with inhaled lidocaine or vehicle immediately after ovalbumin intranasal challenges. Lung function, total and differential leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, peribronchial eosinophil density, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and eotaxin-1 levels, epithelial mucus, collagen, extracellular-matrix deposition, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, and GATA-3 expression were evaluated. Between five and eight animals per group were used. Inhaled lidocaine inhibited ovalbumin-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine, and accumulation of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after the last allergen provocation. Lidocaine administration also prevented other pathophysiological changes triggered by ovalbumin in lung tissue, including peribronchial eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration, subepithelial fibrosis, increased content of collagen and mucus, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin-1. Furthermore, inhaled lidocaine inhibited lung tissue GATA-3 expression in ovalbumin-challenged mice. We also demonstrated that lidocaine inhibited the expression of GATA-3 in ovalbumin-stimulated T cells in vitro. Inhaled lidocaine prevents eosinophilic inflammation, overproduction of mucus, and peribronchial fibrosis in a murine model of asthma, and impaired airway hyperreactivity, possibly by inhibiting allergen-evoked GATA-3 expression and the subsequent up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.
    Anesthesiology 07/2012; 117(3):580-91. · 5.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inhalation of the local anaesthetic lidocaine has been suggested to be beneficial for asthmatics, but airway anaesthesia is unpleasant and may exacerbate bronchoconstriction. Our previous study showed that inhalation of the lidocaine analogue JMF2-1 can elicit the anti-inflammatory properties of lidocaine without anaesthesia. This prompted further research on the mechanism of action and putative therapeutic application of JMF2-1. We tested the hypothesis that JMF2-1 would prevent allergen-induced lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) by modulating T cell function in vivo and in vitro. Methods Local and systemic changes in leucocyte levels, cytokine production and lung mechanics were examined in a murine model of lung inflammation. JMF2-1 (0.05-2%) or saline was aerosolized twice a day during the ovalbumin (OVA)-provocation period (19-21 days post-sensitization). Analyses were performed 24 h after the final challenge. Primary cultured lymph node cells were used to assess the effects of JMF2-1 (100-600 μm) at the cellular level. OVA challenge resulted in lung recruitment of CD4(+) T cells and eosinophils, increased generation of inflammatory cytokines and AHR to inhaled methacholine within 24 h. These changes were prevented by JMF2-1 nebulization, and occurred in parallel with an increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the lung. JMF2-1 treatment did not alter levels of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in the thymus or lymph nodes of naïve mice, although it inhibited OVA-induced IL-13 production and the lymphocyte proliferative response in vitro. It also induced apoptosis of OVA-activated lymphocytes in a mechanism sensitive to z-VAD, indicating that JMF2-1 mediates caspase-dependent apoptosis. Inhalation of JMF2-1 prevents the cardinal features of asthma by reducing T(H) 2 cytokine generation and lung eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrates via local inhibition of T cell function and survival. JMF2-1 may represent a novel therapeutic alternative for asthma control with distinct advantages over local anaesthetics.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 02/2011; 41(2):250-9. · 4.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is evidence that sex and sex hormones influence the severity of asthma. Airway and lung parenchyma remodeling and the relationship of ultrastructural changes to airway responsiveness and inflammation in male, female, and oophorectomized mice (OVX) were analyzed in experimental chronic allergic asthma. Seventy-two BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups (n=24/each): male, female, and OVX mice, whose ovaries were removed 7 days before the start of sensitization. Each group was further randomized to be sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline. Twenty-four hours after the last challenge, collagen fiber content in airways and lung parenchyma, the volume proportion of smooth muscle-specific actin in alveolar ducts and terminal bronchiole, the amount of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, and the number of eosinophils and interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were higher in female than male OVA mice. The response of OVX mice was similar to that of males, except that IL-5 remained higher. Nevertheless, after OVA provocation, airway responsiveness to methacholine was higher in males compared with females and OVX mice. In conclusion, sex influenced the remodeling process, but the mechanisms responsible for airway hyperresponsiveness seemed to differ from those related to remodeling.
    Journal of Applied Physiology 09/2010; 109(3):855-63. · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite an increase in the knowledge of mechanisms and mediators involved in pulmonary fibrosis, there are no successful therapeutics available. Lipoxins (LX) and their 15-epimers, aspirin-triggered LX (ATL), are endogenously produced eicosanoids with potent anti-inflammatory and proresolution effects. To date, few studies have been performed regarding their effect on pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, using C57BL/6 mice, we report that bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung fibrosis was prevented by the concomitant treatment with an ATL synthetic analog, ATLa, which reduced inflammation and matrix deposition. ATLa inhibited BLM-induced leukocyte accumulation and alveolar collapse as evaluated by histology and morphometrical analysis. Moreover, Sirius red staining and lung hydroxyproline content showed an increased collagen deposition in mice receiving BLM alone that was decreased upon treatment with the analog. These effects resulted in benefits to pulmonary mechanics, as ATLa brought to normal levels both lung resistance and compliance. Furthermore, the analog improved mouse survival, suggesting an important role for the LX pathway in the control of disease establishment and progression. One possible mechanism by which ATLa restrained fibrosis was suggested by the finding that BLM-induced myofibroblast accumulation/differentiation in the lung parenchyma was also reduced by both simultaneous and posttreatment with the analog (alpha-actin immunohistochemistry). Interestingly, ATLa posttreatment (4 days after BLM) showed similar inhibitory effects on inflammation and matrix deposition, besides the TGF-beta level reduction in the lung, reinforcing an antifibrotic effect. In conclusion, our findings show that LX and ATL can be considered as promising therapeutic approaches to lung fibrotic diseases.
    The Journal of Immunology 06/2009; 182(9):5374-81. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The addition of a nitric oxide (NO)-releasing moiety to prednisolone was shown to enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of this glucocorticoid in some experimental conditions, but its effectiveness in the context of eosinophilic inflammation remains to be elucidated. This study compared the anti-inflammatory effect of prednisolone to a NO-releasing derivative of prednisolone, NCX-1015, using a model of allergen-evoked eosinophil recruitment in rats. The efficacy of a NO-donor compound, DETA-NONOate, was also assessed for comparison. Wistar rats were actively sensitized with Al(OH)(3) plus ovalbumin and 14 days later challenged with antigen intrapleurally. Treatments were performed locally 1 h before challenge. Cysteinyl-leucotrienes (Cys-LT) and eotaxin were measured by ELISA. Antigen challenge induced an eosinophil infiltration at 12 h, maximal at 24 h. It also caused an increase in the levels of Cys-LTs in the pleural exudate and in the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) in infiltrated leucocytes at 6 h, peaking at 12 h and persisting for at least 24 h. Treatment with equimolar doses of prednisolone and NCX-1015 inhibited the late eosinophil infiltration, although the dose required to produce maximal inhibition was about one-tenth that of prednisolone. Cys-LT generation and 5-LO expression were inhibited by NCX-1015 but not by prednisolone. Treatment with prednisolone combined with the NO-donor DETA-NONOate led to a greater inhibition of the eosinophilia and Cys-LT generation as compared with either drug alone. Administration of the steroid receptor antagonist RU 486, 1 h before prednisolone and NCX-1015, abolished the inhibitory effect of the former, under conditions where it only partially affected the latter. Our findings indicate that NCX-1015 provided a greater anti-inflammatory effect than prednisolone on the allergic eosinophil recruitment in rats, suggesting that NO-releasing steroids can be considered as a promising therapeutic approach to allergic diseases.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 09/2008; 38(11):1830-7. · 4.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lung whose incidence and morbidity continues to rise in developed nations. Despite being a hallmark of asthma, the molecular mechanisms that determine airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) are not completely established. Transcription factors of the NFAT family are involved in the regulation of several asthma-related genes. It has been shown that the absence of NFAT1 leads to an increased pleural eosinophilic allergic response accompanied by an increased production of Th2 cytokines, suggesting a role for NFAT1 in the regulation of allergic diseases. Herein, we analyze NFAT1-/- mice to address the role of NFAT1 in a model of allergic airway inflammation and its influence in AHR. NFAT1-/- mice submitted to airway inflammation display a significant exacerbation of several features of the allergic disease, including lung inflammation, eosinophilia, and serum IgE levels, which were concomitant with elevated Th2 cytokine production. However, in spite of the increased allergic phenotype, NFAT1-/- mice failed to express AHR after methacholine aerosol. Refractoriness of NFAT1-/- mice to methacholine was confirmed in naïve mice, suggesting that this refractoriness occurs in an intrinsic way, independent of the lung inflammation. In addition, NFAT1-/- mice exhibit increased AHR in response to serotonin inhalation, suggesting a specific role for NFAT1 in the methacholine pathway of bronchoconstriction. Taken together, these data add support to the interpretation that NFAT1 acts as a counterregulatory mechanism to suppress allergic inflammation. Moreover, our findings suggest a novel role for NFAT1 protein in airway responsiveness mediated by the cholinergic pathway.
    American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 08/2008; 40(1):66-75. · 4.15 Impact Factor