Susan Bullers

University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina, United States

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Publications (7)10.64 Total impact

  • Susan Bullers · Carol A. Prescott
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    ABSTRACT: Perceived-control ‘describes individuals’generalized beliefs about their abilities to influence their life courses and circumstances. Most research concerning this construct has viewed perceived control as a developmentally acquired, stable personality characteristic. Others argue that perceived control is determined by current social status, with more privileged social positions contributing to increased control over life circumstances.This study analyzes data from the Virginia Twin Registry to determine the independent contributions of genetics, shared environment, and nonshared environment, including adult roles and statuses, on women's perceived control. Findings from latent variable twin models suggest that there are modest but significant effects of shared environment and genetics on perceived control but that the majority of individual variation in perceived control is due to nonshared environmental factors on perceived control among adult women. Analyses of measured individual-level variables indicate significant effects from education, income, earnings, marital quality, age, and single-parent status.
    Sociological Inquiry 01/2007; 71(2):145 - 163. DOI:10.1111/j.1475-682X.2001.tb01106.x · 0.79 Impact Factor
  • Susan Bullers
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    ABSTRACT: This study first explores the physical and psychological health effects of residence near industrial hog farms. The study compares differences in specific health symptoms, psychological distress, and perceived control between a group of 48 nearby residents and a control group (n = 34) with no exposure to hog farms. The process through which nearby residence affects psychological distress is then explored by examining for mediating effects of either physical health symptoms or perceived control. Findings suggest that nearby residence is associated with increases in 12 of the 22 reported physical symptoms. Most of these significantly different symptoms are related to respiratory, sinus, and nausea problems. Nearby residence is also associated with increased psychological distress and decreased perceptions of control. Nearby residence appears to affect psychological distress by increasing physical health symptoms. Although nearby residents report significantly lower perceived control, perceived control does not play a significant role in the process through which nearby residence affects psychological distress.
    Human Ecology 01/2005; 33(1):1-16. DOI:10.1007/s10745-005-1653-3 · 1.63 Impact Factor
  • Susan Bullers · M. Lynne Cooper · Marcia Russell
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    ABSTRACT: Past research shows consistent associations between individuals' drinking patterns and the drinking patterns of their social network members. This association has usually been attributed to the influence of social networks on individual behavior. Recent studies concerning adolescent drinking behavior suggest that such associations may be due, in part, to selection effects in which individuals form social ties with those who have drinking habits similar to their own. The present study used longitudinal data and structural equation modeling to compare the selection and influence effects among a large representative sample of adults. Results suggested that both selection and influence affect the association between individual and network drinking patterns among adults, but that social selection effects are substantially stronger than social influence effects. A cross-lagged structural equation model with a normed fit index of .975, showed that the path indicating peer influence had a coefficient of .069 (P
    Addictive Behaviors 03/2001; 26(2):181-199. DOI:10.1016/S0306-4603(00)00099-X · 2.44 Impact Factor
  • Susan Bullers · M.Lynne Cooper · Marcia Russell
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    ABSTRACT: Past research shows consistent associations between individuals' drinking patterns and the drinking patterns of their social network members. This association has usually been attributed to the influence of social networks on individual behavior. Recent studies concerning adolescent drinking behavior suggest that such associations may be due, in part, to selection effects in which individuals form social ties with those who have drinking habits similar to their own. The present study used longitudinal data and structural equation modeling to compare the selection and influence effects among a large representative sample of adults. Results suggested that both selection and influence affect the association between individual and network drinking patterns among adults, but that social selection effects are substantially stronger than social influence effects. A cross-lagged structural equation model with a normed fit index of .975, showed that the path indicating peer influence had a coefficient of .069 (P<.01), whereas the path indicating network selection had a coefficient of .193 (P<.01). Comparisons across age, race, sex, and marital status groups revealed similar results, with stronger selection than influence effects for all groups.
    Addictive Behaviors 01/2001; 26(2-26):181-199. DOI:10.1016/S0306-4603 · 2.44 Impact Factor
  • Susan Bullers
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    ABSTRACT: This study first examines gender differences in the receipt and efficacy of four types of social ties. It is hypothesized that womens relationships involve more demanding social ties, which increase rather than decrease depressive symptoms. Next, this study explores the role of perceived control as a mediator in the relationship between social tics and depressive symptoms. It is hypothesized that the association between these social ties and depressive symptoms is mediated through perceived control. Results suggest that demanding social ties have the strongest association with depressive symptoms, and that this relationship is much stronger for women than for men. Emotional support is strongly associated with depressive symptoms for men and women, whereas instrumental support and number of close ties have negligible effects on depressive symptoms. Perceived control most strongly mediates (rather than moderates) those relationships with the strongest associations: demanding ties and depressive symptoms, and emotional support and depressive symptoms. Substantial direct associations between social ties and depressive symptoms remain after removing the effects mediated by perceived control.
    Women & Health 02/2000; 31(2-3):97-116. DOI:10.1300/J013v31n02_05 · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • Susan Bullers
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    ABSTRACT: Research concerning women's roles and health has revealed inconsistencies regarding the effects of work/family roles on women's health. Recent work in this area suggests that role characteristics or role quality may be more important in determining health than simple role occupancy. In addition, it has been suggested that role factors may affect health by increasing or decreasing one's perceptions of personal control over life. This study uses logistic regression techniques on data from the 1987 General Social Survey to explore the effects of roles and role quality on women's health, as well as the mediating effects of perceived control in the relationship between role factors and health. It is hypothesized that (1) role quality variables are better predictors of health than role occupancy (2) the effects on health of roles, and role quality, are mediated by perceived control. In the role occupancy model, findings show that employment is the only role associated with health, and perceived control does modify this relationship slightly. Both high and low quality employment roles predict better health, whereas only high quality marital roles predict better health. While perceived control does mediate, slightly the effects of job quality on health, the positive effects of marital status on health are suppressed slightly by perceived control.
    Women & Health 01/1995; 22(2):11-30. DOI:10.1300/J013v22n02_02 · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • J. E. Mutchler · S. Bullers
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    ABSTRACT: This article assesses gender differences in the use of formal versus informal sources of in-home care among impaired elders. Data from the 1984 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation are used in the analysis. The results suggest that married women are more likely to receive formal care than are married men, but this pattern does not hold for the unmarried. This result is consistent with gendered expectations regarding caregiving and receipt within the marital unit.
    Research on Aging 09/1994; 16(3):235-250. DOI:10.1177/0164027594163001 · 1.23 Impact Factor