Shintaro Hayashida

Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan

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Publications (8)13.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The indications for duct-to-duct (DD) biliary reconstruction in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) for small children are still controversial. In this study, the feasibility of DD was investigated in terms of the long-term outcomes compared with Roux-en-Y (RY) biliary reconstruction. Fifty-six consecutive children who underwent LDLT at a weight of less than 10 kg were enrolled. Biliary reconstruction was performed using DD in 20 patients and RY in 36 patients. During a minimum of two years of follow-up, the incidence of biliary stricture was 5.0% in the DD group and 11.1% in the RY group. Cholangitis during post-transplant period was observed in the RY group only. There was no mortality related to biliary problems. This study showed that DD reconstruction in LDLT for small children (weighing less than 10 kg) is a feasible option for biliary reconstruction. Liver Transpl , 2014. © 2014 AASLD.
    Liver Transplantation 01/2014; · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the indications and timing of LT for WD. From 2000 to 2009, eight patients with WD who had been referred to our institution for LT were enrolled in this study. The mean patient age was 15.9 yr (range, 7-37 yr). Four patients could not receive LT, because there were no available donors. All four patients were treated with chelating agent medication. Three of them (two of two patients with fulminant WD and one of two with cirrhotic WD) who did not undergo LT are still alive and doing well with stable liver functional tests. Only one of the patients with cirrhotic WD who did not undergo LT died of hepatic failure. Even among the four patients who underwent LT, one with fulminant WD recovered from hepatic encephalopathy with apheresis therapy and chelating agent. He later required LT because of severe neutropenia from d-penicillamine. The other three patients who underwent LT recovered and have been doing well. Some of the patients with WD can recover and avoid LT with medical treatment. Even when WD has progressed liver cirrhosis and/or fulminant hepatic failure at the time of diagnosis, medical treatment should be tried before considering LT.
    Pediatric Transplantation 06/2013; 17(4):369-73. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the increased number of long-term survivors after liver transplantation, new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is becoming more significant in patient follow-up. However, the incidence of new-onset diabetes after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has not been well elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and risk factors for NODAT in adult LDLT recipients at a single center in Japan. A retrospective study was performed on 161 adult patients without diabetes who had been followed up for ≥three months after LDLT. NODAT was defined according to the 2003 American Diabetes Association/World Health Organization guidelines. The recipient-, donor-, operation-, and immunosuppression-associated risk factors for NODAT were assessed. Overall, the incidence of NODAT was 13.7% (22/161) with a mean follow-up of 49.8 months. In a multivariate analysis, the identified risk factors for NODAT were donor liver-to-spleen (L-S) ratio (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.022, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.001-0.500, p = 0.017), and steroid pulse therapy for acute rejection (HR = 3.320, 95% CI = 1.365-8.075, p = 0.008). In conclusion, donor L-S ratio and steroid pulse therapy for acute rejection were independent predictors for NODAT in LDLT recipients. These findings can help in screening for NODAT and applying early interventions.
    Clinical Transplantation 03/2013; · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Gastrointestinal dysfunction is a common complication in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms are associated with a patient's nutritional status. The object of this study was to evaluate changes in peritransplant gastrointestinal symptoms and the nutritional status of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy patients using the modified body mass index following a living-donor liver transplant. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective analysis, we compared 17 Japanese familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy patients who underwent living-donor liver transplant in Kumamoto University Hospital between 2000 and 2009 with a control group of 28 patients with chronic liver disease. We analyzed the peritransplant gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional status, duration of central venous catheterization, and postoperative hospital stay. The Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test were used to analyze relations between the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy group and control group, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, to analyze the relation of perioperative modified body mass index, with a value for P < .05 considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The duration of central venous catheterization and postoperative hospital stay were significantly longer in the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy group than they were in the control group. There was no significant difference between modified body mass index preoperatively and 1 year after living-donor liver transplant. Although gastrointestinal symptoms were typically mild before living-donor liver transplant, the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy group experienced a temporary deterioration in gastrointestinal symptoms after receiving the living-donor liver transplant but recovered after approximately 2 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy patients experienced temporary exacerbations of gastrointestinal symptoms, their nutritional status was not affected during the peritransplant period, and they generally recovered within 2 months.
    Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. 02/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombocytopenia is common after LT for pediatric end-stage liver diseases. Seventy-six pediatric patients (≤15 yr old) who underwent LDLT were evaluated for the incidence and predictive factors of post-transplant thrombocytopenia (PLT <100, 000/mm(3) ). The prevalence of thrombocytopenia at two wk and at 12 months post-transplant was 22/76 (28.9%) and 11/62 (17.7%), respectively. Thrombocytopenia at two wk after LDLT was significantly associated with age at transplant, preoperative PLT, GRWR, acute rejection, and CMV infection in univariate analysis. Moreover, preoperative PLT, GRWR, and acute rejection had a strong correlation in multivariate analysis. Thrombocytopenia at 12 months after LDLT was associated only with preoperative PLT. We also demonstrated that vascular complications caused thrombocytopenia and that successful treatment recovered the PLT. These results showed that, in addition to considering the preoperative PLT, post-operative monitoring of platelets is very helpful for the early detection of adverse events related to the graft liver in pediatric liver transplant patients.
    Pediatric Transplantation 07/2011; 15(6):601-5. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Survivors of childhood cancer have a higher risk of developing a secondary neoplasm in their lifetime. The increased risk of a second malignant neoplasm is related to treatment of the primary tumor and genetic predisposition. We describe a 19-year-old man with 2 hepatic masses, one of which was diagnosed as a hepatic angiomyolipoma and the other as focal nodular hyperplasia 14 years after the treatment of stage IV pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma. The combination of these tumors has not previously been reported in the literature.
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery 06/2011; 46(6):1267-70. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Some familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) patients show the post-transplant progression of the clinical symptoms. Although the presence of recipient-derived cells in transplanted livers has been reported, no studies investigating the functional significance of this post-transplant chimerism in transplanted FAP patients were performed. The aims of this study were to evaluate amyloidogenic transthyretin (ATTR) production of recipient-derived cells and the relationship between the protein from recipient-derived cells and the progression of FAP symptoms after liver transplantation (LT). Seven FAP ATTR Val30Met patients who underwent LT were included in this study. In one male patient with sex-mismatched donor, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was performed on a liver biopsy sample using DNA probes for visualizing X and Y chromosomes to detect the recipient-derived cells. In three patients including the FISH-analysed patient, ATTR mRNA expression in transplanted livers was evaluated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism method and realtime quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. In five of the seven patients, ATTR in serum protein expression was measured by mass spectrometry. One FAP patient has 3.1% recipient-derived cells in the transplanted liver. The ATTR mRNA was not expressed in any of the three transplanted livers. The ATTR was not detected in any sera of the sampled patients. Although the FAP patient had recipient-derived cells in the transplanted liver, the recipient-derived cells did not contribute to the production of ATTR in our specific case. The effect of recipient-derived cells on the post-transplant progression of FAP symptoms may be negligible.
    Annals of Clinical Biochemistry 10/2010; 47(Pt 6):529-34. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 10-yr-old boy with end-stage liver cirrhosis due to Wilson's disease received a living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) at our institution. The donor was his father and the graft was a left lateral segment. The liver transplantation procedure and the postoperative course were uneventful. Two months after the procedure, he developed a first episode of bowel obstruction that was treated with conservative therapy. During a second episode of bowel obstruction, he also presented respiratory distress. A plain chest X-ray revealed the presence of small intestine loops in the right thoracic cavity and bowel obstruction due to diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed. Repair of the diaphragmatic hernia was performed and the patient has been doing well after the surgery. Diaphragmatic hernia after LDLT is rare but should be recognized as a possible complication when a left lobe or a left lateral segment graft is used.
    Pediatric Transplantation 06/2007; 11(3):324-6. · 1.50 Impact Factor