Suvi Larjavaara

University of Tampere, Tammerfors, Province of Western Finland, Finland

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Publications (5)25.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The reported incidence rates of vestibular schwannomas (VS) vary substantially, but it is unclear as to what extent the variation reflects differences in risk or recording practices. Our aim was to describe the incidence rates of VS in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden between 1987 and 2007. Comprehensive data were available from all registries only for the period from 1987 to 2007. An analysis of a longer time period (1965-2007) was conducted with the Norwegian and Swedish data. The average age-standardised incidence rates during 1987-2007 varied from 6.1 per 1,000,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI), 5.4-6.7) among Finnish men to 11.6 (95% CI, 10.4-12.7) in Danish men, and from 6.4 per 1,000,000 person-years (95% CI, 5.7-7.0) among Swedish women to 11.6 (95% CI, 10.5-12.8) among Danish women. An overall annual increase of 3.0% (95% CI 2.1-3.9) was observed when all countries and both sexes were combined, with considerable differences between countries. However, the practices of both reporting and coding VS cases varied markedly between countries and over time, which poses a challenge for interpretation of the results. The overall incidence of VS increased in all the four Nordic countries combined between 1987 and 2007, with marked differences between countries. However, the incidence rates more or less stabilised in the late 1990s, showing relatively constant incidence rates and even some decline after 2000.
    British Journal of Cancer 09/2011; 105(7):1069-75. · 5.08 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Epidemiology &amp Community Health 08/2011; 65(Suppl 1):A225-A225. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The energy absorbed from the radio-frequency fields of mobile telephones depends strongly on distance from the source. The authors' objective in this study was to evaluate whether gliomas occur preferentially in the areas of the brain having the highest radio-frequency exposure. The authors used 2 approaches: In a case-case analysis, tumor locations were compared with varying exposure levels; in a case-specular analysis, a hypothetical reference location was assigned for each glioma, and the distances from the actual and specular locations to the handset were compared. The study included 888 gliomas from 7 European countries (2000-2004), with tumor midpoints defined on a 3-dimensional grid based on radiologic images. The case-case analyses were carried out using unconditional logistic regression, whereas in the case-specular analysis, conditional logistic regression was used. In the case-case analyses, tumors were located closest to the source of exposure among never-regular and contralateral users, but not statistically significantly. In the case-specular analysis, the mean distances between exposure source and location were similar for cases and speculars. These results do not suggest that gliomas in mobile phone users are preferentially located in the parts of the brain with the highest radio-frequency fields from mobile phones.
    American journal of epidemiology 07/2011; 174(1):2-11. · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the undercount of meningiomas in a population-based cancer registry. A comprehensive material was formed by compiling hospital sources with the Finnish Cancer Registry database. The completeness of each source ranged 62-69%. The corrected age-standardised meningioma incidence was 2.9/100,000 for men and 13.0/100,000 for women, a third higher than the cancer registry figures.
    British Journal of Cancer 08/2008; 99(1):182-4. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 x 1 x 1-cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II-III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain.
    Neuro-Oncology 08/2007; 9(3):319-25. · 6.18 Impact Factor