Stanley Y. W. Su

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States

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Publications (143)50.57 Total impact

  • Stanley Y.W. Su · Herman Lam · Rakesh Lodha · Sherman Bai · Zuo-Jun Max Shen
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    ABSTRACT: This chapter presents the design and implementation of an Event-Trigger-Rule-based electronic supply-chain management system (ESCM). The ESCM is constructed by a network of Knowledge Web Servers, each of which consists of a Web server, an Event Manager, an Event-Trigger-Rule (ETR) Server, a Knowledge Profile Manager, a Persistent Object Manager, a Metadata Manager, a Negotiation Server, and a Cost-Benefit Evaluation Server. Together, they manage the activities and interactions among Manufacturers, Distributors and Retailers. ESCM offers a number of features. First and foremost is the flexibility offered to business entities in defining their own rules according to their own business strategies. Second, since the rules that control the business activities are installed and processed by the multiple copies of the ETR server installed at business entities' individual sites, their privacy and security are safeguarded. Third, ESCM's event, event filtering and event notification mechanisms keep both Buyers and Suppliers better informed with more timely information about business events so that they or their software systems can take the proper actions in different business processes.
    12/2004: pages 299-322;
  • Gilliean Lee · Stanley Y. W. Su
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    ABSTRACT: In this work, distributed and sharable learning resources are modeled by two types of Learning Objects (LOs): Atomic Learning Object and Composite Learning Object. LOs are uniformly published as Web-services in a constraint-based Web-service registry and are made sharable and reusable. This paper presents the learning object models for the specification of these two types of LOs and an extended Web- service infrastructure, which provides a standard framework for the registration, discovery, binding and invocation of these objects. An Event-Trigger-Rule Server is integrated with a Learning Process Execution Engine to make Composite Learning Objects active, flexible, customizable and adaptive.
    12/2004: pages 247-280;
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    Nicky Joshi · Kushal Thakore · Stanley Y. W. Su
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the design and implementation of an Event-Trigger-Rule-Based auction system called IntelliBid. A network of Knowledge Web Servers, each consisting of a Web server, an Event-Trigger-Rule (ETR) Server, an Event Engine, a Knowledge Profile Manager, and Bid Servers and their proxies constitutes IntelliBid. Together, they provide auction-related services to the creator of an auction site and the bidders and suppliers of products. IntelliBid offers a number of desirable features. First and foremost is the flexibility offered to bidders for defining their own rules to control their bids in an automatic bidding process, which frees the bidders from having to be on-line to place bids. By using different rules, the bidders can apply different bidding strategies. Second, it furnishes valuable statistical information about past auctions to both suppliers (or sellers) and bidders. The information can assist a bidder in bidding and a seller in setting a reasonable base price and/or the minimum incremental price. Third, since rules that control the automatic bidding are installed and processed by the ETR servers installed at bidders' individual sites, bidders' privacy and security are safeguarded. The statistical information that is released by IntelliBid only depicts the trend of the bidding prices of a product. The information about bidders is kept completely secret, thus safeguarding the privacy of the bidders. Fourth, IntelliBid's event, event filtering and event notification mechanisms keep both bidders and suppliers timely informed of auction events so that they or their software system can take the proper actions in the auction process. Fifth, any registered user of IntelliBid, bidder or supplier, can monitor the bids placed to any product being auctioned in IntelliBid. Sixth, IntelliBid allows bidders to do both on-line (or manual) bidding and automatic bidding. It also allows a bidder to participate in several auctions at the same time, in both manual and automated modes. The bidding of a product can depend on the result of the bidding of another product. Last, but not least, IntelliBid allows a person or organization to play both the role of bidder and the role of supplier simultaneously. The Profile Manager keeps the information as a bidder and information as a supplier separately. Moreover, IntelliBid's architecture uses a parallel event management system to do event registration and notification. This paper also reports the result of a performance study on the implication of using such a parallel system to achieve scalability.
    World Wide Web 06/2004; 7:181-210. DOI:10.1023/B:WWWJ.0000017209.39493.e7 · 1.62 Impact Factor
  • Karthik Nagarajan · Herman Lam · Stanley Y. W. Su
    International Journal of Web Services Research 01/2004; 1(1):41-57. DOI:10.4018/jwsr.2004010103 · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the popularity of the Web services technology, more and more software systems?functionalities become available by being published and registered as Web services. Registered Web services need to be dynamically combined to form composite services when individual simple services fail to meet service requestors?complex service needs. In this article, we propose a semi-automatic approach to composite Web services discovery, description and invocation. We present an intelligent registry with constraint matching capabilities to support composite service discovery and description. It provides a user interface to interactively compose a service request. It then uses a semi-automatic mechanism and a search algorithm to construct a composite service template that satisfies the request. The operations of the template are bound to registered service operations by constraint matching subsequently. The resulting composite service is specified in the Web Services Flow Language. A composite service processor is designed to execute composite services by invoking the component service operations of various service providers.
    International Journal of Web Services Research 01/2004; 1:64-89. DOI:10.4018/jwsr.2004100105 · 0.47 Impact Factor
  • Gilliean Lee · Xu Zhang · Stanley Y. W. Su
    Proceedings of the 7th IASTED International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education, August 16-18, 2004, Kauai, Hawaii, USA; 01/2004
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    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the detection and management of a soybean rust outbreak in the context of agricultural homeland security. An Event-Trigger-Rule system is used for event registration, filtering and notification, and for process coordination and enforcement of agencies' policies, constraints, regulations and data integrity/security/privacy. A 'Response and Action Plan' for combating the disease proposed by one of the 12 member states of the Southern Plant Diagnostic Network is used in a prototype implementation to demonstrate the utility of the system.
  • Stanley Y. W. Su · Gilliean Lee
    World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education; 01/2004
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    Youzhong Liu · Fahong Yu · Stanley Y.W. Su · Herman Lam
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    ABSTRACT: Business organizations are often faced with decision situations in which the costs and benefits of some competing business specifications such as business offers, product specifications, or negotiation proposals need to be evaluated in order to select the best or desirable ones. In e-business, there is a need to automate the cost–benefit evaluation process to support decision making. This paper presents a general-purpose Cost–Benefit Evaluation Server (CBES) and its underlying Cost–Benefit Decision Model (CBDM), which models benefits in terms of costs and logical scoring and aggregation of preferences associated with products and services. The Server provides build-time tools for users to specify preference and cost information and a run-time engine to perform cost–benefit evaluations. A business scenario involving supplier selection and automated negotiation is given to illustrate the application of the Server and its four evaluation modes.
    Decision Support Systems 09/2003; 36(1-36):81-97. DOI:10.1016/S0167-9236(02)00133-1 · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Karthik Nagarajan · Herman Lam · Stanley Y. W. Su
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Web Services, ICWS '03, June 23 - 26, 2003, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; 01/2003
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    Stanley Y. W. Su · Gilliean Lee
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes an on-going effort to investigate problems and approaches for achieving Web-service-based, dynamic and collaborative e-learning. In this work, a Learning Content Definition Model is used to model distributed and sharable learning resources as content objects. Distributed and sharable software systems/components for supporting e-learning are modeled as software objects. Both types of objects are uniformly published as Web-services in a constraint-based Web-service registry and made sharable and reusable. An extended Web-service infrastructure provides a standard framework for the modeling, registration, discovery, binding and invocation of these objects. In this work, we also introduce a Learning Process Definition Model and a Learning Process Execution Engine for specifying and executing learning process models, which represent instructional modules in the forms of activity trees. An Event-Trigger-Rule Server is integrated with the Learning Process Execution Engine to make learning process models active, flexible, customizable and adaptable. It is also used to facilitate the interaction and coordination among learners, administrators, authors, and other personnel involved in collaborative e- learning.
    PGLDB'2003, Proceedings of the I PGL Database Research Conference, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 10-11, 2003; 01/2003
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    Stanley Y.W. Su · Jie Meng · Raja Krithivasan · Seema Degwekar · Sumi Helal
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an infrastructure and a mechanism for achieving dynamic Inter-enterprise workflow management using e-services provided by collaborative e-business enterprises. E-services are distributed services that can be accessed programmatically on the Internet, using SOAP messages and the HTTP protocol. In this work, we categorize e-services according to their business types and manage them in a UDDI-enabled constraint-based Broker Server. E-service requests are specified in the activities of a process model according to some standardized e-service templates and are bound to the proper service providers at run-time by using a constraint-based, dynamic service binding mechanism. The workflow management system is dynamic in the sense that the actual business organizations, which take part in a business process, are not determined until run-time. We have extended the traditional workflow process modeling by including e-service requests in activity specifications and extended the Web Service Description Language (WSDL) by including constraints in both service specifications and service requests so that the selection of e-service providers can be more accurately performed.
    Electronic Commerce Research 12/2002; 3(1):9-24. DOI:10.1023/A:1021521209515 · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    Jie Meng · Raja Krithivasan · Stanley Y. W. Su · Sumi Helal
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a solution to achieve dynamic Inter-enterprise workflow management using the eservices provided by collaborative e-business enterprises. E-services are distributed services that can be accessed programmatically on the Internet, using SOAP messages and the HTTP protocol. We categorize e-services according to their business types and manage them in an UDDI-enabled Broker Server. By E-service requests are specified in the activities of a process model according to some standardized e-service templates and are bound to the proper service providers at run-time by using a constraint-based, dynamic service binding mechanism. The workflow management system is dynamic in the sense that the actual business organizations that take part in a business process are not determined until run-time.
  • Article: Unknown
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    ABSTRACT: As the global marketplace becomes more and more competitive, business organizations often need to team up and operate as a virtual enterprise in order to utilize the best of their resources for achieving their common business goals. Since the business environment of a virtual enterprise is highly dynamic, it is necessary to develop a workflow management technology that is capable of handling dynamic workflows across enterprise boundaries. This paper describes a dynamic workflow model (DWM) and a dynamic workflow management system (DynaFlow) for modeling and controlling the execution of inter-organizational business processes. DWM enables the specification of dynamic properties associated with a business process model. It extends the underlying model of the WfMC's WPDL by adding connectors, events, triggers, and rules as its modeling constructs, encapsulating activity definitions, and allowing e-service requests to be included as a part of the activity specification. Using DWM as the underlying model, DynaFlow makes use of an event and rule server to trigger rules during the enactment of a workflow process to enforce business constraints and policies and/or to modify the process model at run-time. A constraint-based, dynamic service binding mechanism is used to dynamically bind e-service requests to e-services that satisfy some constraint specifications. Index Items: dynamic workflow model, dynamic workflow management system, business process, e-service, e-service constraint, e-service request constraint, business event, business rule, dynamic service binding. 3 1.
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    Haifei Li · Chunbo Huang · Stanley Y W Su
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the specification, generation and exchange of business ob-jects in the context of electronic commerce. Common business objects have been defined for product catalogs, purchase orders and other business entities. However, no business objects have been defined and implemented for supporting automated business negotiations even though business negotiation is very much an integral part of business activities. In this work, we have designed and implemented a set of business negotiation objects for supporting the bargaining type of business negotiations. These objects define the operations and information contents needed for negotiation parties to express their requirements and constraints during a bargaining proc-ess. They correspond to a set of negotiation primitives, which is a superset of the negotiation-related primitives defined in two popular languages: ACL and COOL. The implementation of these objects is patterned after the business object documents in the XML format proposed by the Open Applications Group, thus conforming to the established standard. The incorporation of several types of constraint specifications in these business nego-tiation objects provides the negotiation parties and the negotiation servers that represent them much expressive power in specifying call-for-proposals and proposals. Two synchronization problems and their solutions associ-ated with the withdrawal and modification of negotiation proposals are addressed and presented in this paper. The use of these business negotiation objects in a bilateral bargaining protocol is also presented. We have vali-dated the utility of these objects in an integrated network environment, which consists of two replicated negotia-tion servers, two commercial products, and some other university research systems that form a supply chain.
    Group Decision and Negotiation 01/2002; 11:23-44. DOI:10.1023/A:1014513300361 · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Seokwon Yang · Herman Lam · Stanley Y. W. Su
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    ABSTRACT: The emerging Web service technology has enabled the development of Internet-based applications that integrate distributed and heterogeneous systems and processes which are owned by different organizations. Compared to centralized systems and client-server environments, the Web service environment is much more dynamic and security for such an environment poses unique challenges. For example, an organization (e.g., a service provider or a service broker) cannot predetermine the users of its resources and fix their access privileges. Also, service providers come and go. The users of services must have some assurances about the services and the organizations that provide the services. Thus, the enforcement of security constraints cannot be static and tightly coupled. The notion of trust agreement must be established to delegate the responsibility of certification of unknown users, services, and organizations. In this paper, we describe a Trust-based Security Model (TSM) that incorporate the traditional security concepts (e.g., roles, resources, operations) with new security concepts that are specific to the Web service environment. The security concepts of TSM are then applied to the general Web service model to include security considerations. Finally, an event-driven, rule-based approach to the enforcement of security in a Web service environment is described.
    Technologies for E-Services, Third International Workshop, TES 2002, Hong Kong, China, August 23-24, 2002, Proceedings; 01/2002
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the design and implementation of a replicable, Internet-based negotiation server for conducting bargaining-type negotiations between enterprises involved in e-commerce and e-business. Enterprises can be buyers and sellers of products/services or participants of a complex supply chain engaged in purchasing, planning, and scheduling. Multiple copies of our server can be installed to complement the services of Web servers. Each enterprise can install or select a trusted negotiation server to represent his/her interests. Web-based GUI tools are used during the build-time registration process to specify the requirements, constraints, and rules that represent negotiation policies and strategies, preference scoring of different data conditions, and aggregation methods for deriving a global cost-benefit score for the item(s) under negotiation. The registration information is used by the negotiation servers to automatically conduct bargaining type negotiations on behalf of their clients. In this paper, we present the architecture of our implementation as well as a framework for automated negotiations, and describe a number of communication primitives which are used in the underlying negotiation protocol. A constraint satisfaction processor (CSP) is used to evaluate a negotiation proposal or counterproposal against the registered requirements and constraints of a client company. In case of a constraint violation, an event is posted to trigger the execution of negotiation strategic rules, which either automatically relax the violated constraint, ask for human intervention, invoke an application, or perform other remedial operations. An Event-Trigger-Rule (ETR) server is used to manage events, triggers, and rules. Negotiation strategic rules can be added or modified at run-time. A cost-benefit analysis component is used to perform quantitative analysis of alternatives. The use of negotiation servers to conduct automated negotiation has been demonstrated in the context of an integrated supply chain scenario.
    The VLDB Journal 07/2001; 10(1):72-90. DOI:10.1007/s007780100051 · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    Jie Meng · Stanley Y. W. Su · Herman Lam · Abdelsalam Helal
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    ABSTRACT: In the highly competitive and rapidly changing and expanding global marketplace, business organizations often form a virtual enterprise with others to achieve various business goals. Traditional workflow technology is used to coordinate the activities of an organization. Since the business environment of a virtual enterprise is highly dynamic, it is necessary to develop a workflow management technology that is capable of handling dynamic workflows across enterprise boundaries. This paper describes the development of a dynamic workflow model and a dynamic workflow management system for modeling and controlling the execution of inter-organizational business processes in a virtual enterprise environment. The dynamic inter-organizational workflows are used to integrate e-services provided by the participating organizations. The dynamic workflow model (DWM) described in this paper enables the specification of dynamic properties associated with a business process model. It is an extension of the underlying model of the Workflow Management Coalition's Workflow Process Definition Language by adding connectors, events, triggers and rules as modeling constructs, encapsulating activity definitions, and supporting e-service requests. We also introduce a constraint-based, dynamic service binding mechanism for the enactment of business processes. The technique for run-time modifications of the process models to alter the course of executing workflow instances is also addressed in our work. The dynamic workflow management system is a part of an information infrastructure being developed for supporting Internet-based Scalable E-business Enterprise (ISEE).
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    HAIFEI LI · Stanley Y. W. Su · Herman Lam · Yihua Huang
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    ABSTRACT: How to apply negotiation principles to E-business is an important topic for both negotiation research and E-business research. Automation of E-business negotiation is even more challenging due to the inherent complexity of business negotiations. Some research has been done in this area, but a comprehensive model for automated E-business negotiation is still missing. Furthermore, existing work in this area does not consider the negotiation process from a full life cycle perspective; therefore valuable information from a previous negotiation is not properly used for the future negotiations. This report discusses two important issues related to automated E-business negotiation: model and life cycle. A system architecture based on the model and the life cycle is proposed.
  • Stanley Y. W. Su · Herman Lam · Minsoo Lee · Sherman Bai · Zuo-Jun Max Shen
    5th International Enterprise Distributed Object Computing Conference (EDOC 2001), 4-7 September 2001, Seattle, WA, USA, Proceedings; 01/2001

Publication Stats

2k Citations
50.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1971–2011
    • University of Florida
      • • Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering
      • • Database Systems Research and Development Center
      • • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Gainesville, Florida, United States
  • 1995
    • Tatung Institute of Commerce and Technology
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan