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Publications (2)2.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Etravirine (TMC125), a next-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, has shown antiviral efficacy in 2 large Phase 3 trials. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that etravirine is not associated with proarrhythmic potential. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) from healthy and HIV 1-infected volunteers showed no clinically relevant changes. To evaluate the effect of 2 etravirine dosing regimens on QT/corrected QT interval (QTc) in HIV-negative volunteers and assess pharmacokinetic and additional safety parameters. A double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, placebo- and active-controlled, 4-period crossover trial was conducted in 41 HIV-negative volunteers. Participants received 4 regimens: etravirine 200 mg twice daily, etravirine 400 mg once daily, moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily (positive control), and placebo in separate 8-day sessions, with each followed by a washout period of 14 or more days. On days -1, 1, and 8 of each session, ECGs were recorded at 11 time points over 12 hours. Pharmacokinetic profiles of etravirine regimens were evaluated and safety was assessed. Thirty-seven subjects completed the study. For etravirine, the upper limit of the 90% CIs of mean time-matched differences in QTc determined using Fridericia's formula (QTcF) was below 10 msec at all time points, the threshold for prolonged QT as defined by regulatory guidelines. The maximum mean (90% CI) difference of time-matched changes in QTcF versus placebo on day 1 was +0.1 msec (-2.6 to 2.9), -0.2 msec (-2.6 to 2.1), and +10.1 msec (7.3 to 12.8) for etravirine 200 mg twice daily, etravirine 400 mg once daily, and moxifloxacin, respectively. On day 8, these values were +0.6 msec (-2.1 to 3.3), -1.0 msec (-4.4 to 2.5), and +10.3 msec (6.8 to 13.9), respectively. Etravirine produced no clinically significant changes in other ECG parameters. No significant differences between males and females were observed. Both etravirine regimens had similar pharmacokinetic exposure and safety profiles. Etravirine does not prolong the QTc interval. No clinically relevant ECG changes were observed in HIV-negative volunteers. Short-term dosing of etravirine in HIV-negative volunteers was generally safe and well tolerated.
    Annals of Pharmacotherapy 07/2008; 42(6):757-65. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conclusions • The administration of TMC125 did not prolong QTcF. • A lack of effect of TMC125 on QTcF was demonstrated irrespective of gender. • There were no clinically consistent or relevant changes in any other ECG parameters with TMC125. • Daily exposure to TMC125 was similar for bid and qd dosing. • No correlation was observed between TMC125 plasma concentrations and QTcF. A 44% increase in C max of TMC125 when administered qd did not cause QTcF prolongation. • Safety and tolerability were similar for both TMC125 regimens despite a higher C max for qd TMC125; no new safety issues were identified. • The results of the thorough QT study demonstrate that TMC125 can be safely administered without the need for ECG monitoring.
    J Virol Lancet Lancet AIDS Gruzdev B AIDS AIDS AIDS Lancet Castillo R Ann Pharmacother May Acta Med Scand. 01/2005; 79370370171721213653615(11):12773-8229.