Rosse Mary Falcón-Antenucci

São Paulo State University, São José do Rio Preto, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (24)17.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of occlusal veneering material in single fixed implant-supported crowns through the 3-D  finite element method. Material and methods: Four models were fabricated using the Rhinoceros 4.0, SolidWorks, and InVesalius softwares. Each model represented a block of mandibular bone with an external hexagon implant of 5 mm x 10 mm and different veneering materials including NiCr (1), porcelain (2), composite resin (3), and acrylic resin (4). An axial load of 200 N and an oblique load of 100 N were applied. Results: model (2) with porcelain veneering presented a lower stress concentration for the NiCr framework, followed by the composite resin and acrylic resin. The stress distribution to the implant and bone tissue was similar for all models. Conclusions: there is no difference of stress distribution to the implant and supporting structures by varying the veneering material of a single implant-supported prosthesis.
    Implant news. 11/2013; 10(6a-PBA):36-43.
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    ABSTRACT: The use of implants of greater length may be more favorable for the predictability of dental implants. This statement is relevant, since the cause of failures in dental implants are more related to biomechanical complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of increase of the length around the entire body of the implant. Six models were created with the presence of only one hexagonal implant (Master Screw connection, Implant Systems, São Paulo, Brazil) of 3.75 mm x 7.0 mm (Model A), 3.75 mm x 8.5 mm (Model B ), 3.75 mm x 10.0 mm (Model C) 3.75 mm x 11.5 mm (Model D) 3.75 mm x 13.0 mm (Model E) 3.75 mm x 15.0 mm (Model F) using the method of photoelasticity. The results were visualized through a qualitative analysis of stresses (number and intensity photoelastic fringes). The model A showed a pattern of less favorable stress distribution, the oblique loading was the most detrimental to the related structures. Conclusion: The increased length allowed for a better distribution of stresses. The oblique loading was more detrimental when compared to axial loading.
    Revista de Cirurgia e Traumatologia Buco-maxilo-facial. 07/2013; 13(3):87-94.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution in mandibular free-end removable partial dentures (RPD) associated with FPD in the abutment teeth considering different inclinations of the residual ridge: (1) horizontal and (2) distal descending ridges and two designs of free-end RPD with different attachment systems were tested: (1) clasp and (2) system ERA. Methods. Axial loads (100 N) were applied on the teeth of the RPD. The images were recorded and the stress distribution was evaluated through photoelastic fringes. Results. In general, the distal descending ridge presented more photoelastic fringes in the region of the roots of the abutment teeth while the horizontal ridge exhibited higher compression in the base of the prosthesis. In the horizontal ridge, the denture with clasp presented more favourable stress distribution than the denture with the system ERA. In the distal descending ridge, the denture with the system ERA relieved the region of the abutment teeth and overloaded the residual ridge. Conclusion: The horizontal ridge presented more favourable performance; the dentures with clasp exhibited better performance for both ridges evaluated; the denture with the system ERA presented better results in the distal descending ridge.
    Acta odontologica Scandinavica 01/2013; · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective. This study aimed to investigate the stress distribution in screwed implant-supported prostheses with different implant-abutment connections by using a photoelastic analysis. Materials and methods. Four photoelastic models were fabricated in PL-2 resin and divided according to the implant-abutment connection (external hexagon (EH) and Morse taper (MT) implants (3.75 × 11.5 mm)) and the number crowns (single and 3-unit piece). Models were positioned in a circular polariscope and 100-N axial and oblique (45) loading were applied in the occlusal surface of the crowns by using a universal testing machine. The stresses were photographically recorded and qualitatively analyzed using software (Adobe Photoshop). Results. Under axial loading, the MT implants exhibited a lower number of fringes for single-unit crowns than EH implants, whereas for a 3-unit piece the MT implants showed a higher number of fringes vs EH implants. The oblique loading increased the number of fringes for all groups. Conclusion. In conclusion, the MT implant-abutment connection reduced the amount of stress in single-unit crowns, for 3-unit piece crowns the amount of stress was lower using an external hexagon connection. The stress pattern was similar for all groups. Oblique loading promoted a higher stress concentration than axial loading.
    Acta odontologica Scandinavica 04/2012; · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of removable partial dentures (RPD) at the Aracatuba Dental School. The study was conducted by analysing 412 clinical history of patients attended at the RPD clinics in the period from 2000 to 2007. 412 charts were analysed: 148 (35.9%) men and 264 (64.1%) women. The mean age was 53.8 years (men) and 52.4 years (women). A total of 556 dentures were made; of these, 233 (41.90%) were maxillary and 323 (58.09%) were mandibular dentures. The most frequent Kennedy classification found was Class III (maxilla) and Class I (mandible). In the maxilla, 55% (126) of the major connectors were of the anterior-posterior palatal bar, while in the mandible, 64% (202) were the lingual bar. As regards the claps, 401 were circumferential and 318 were bar claps. The mean age of the patients was 52.9 years with higher prevalence of female patients; the most frequent Kennedy's classification was Class I in mandible and Class III in maxilla; the most common major connector was anterior-posterior palatal bar for maxilla and lingual bar for mandible; the circumferential clasps were the most common retainer used in both jaws.
    Gerodontology 03/2012; 29(2):140-4. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution with different implant systems through photoelasticity. Five models were fabricated with photoelastic resin PL-2. Each model was composed by a block of photoelastic resin (10x40x45mm) with an implant and a healing abutment. Model 1- Internal hexagon implant (4.0x10mm) (Conect AR, Conexão, São Paulo, Brazil), model 2- Morse taper / Internal octagon implant (4.1x10mm) (Standard, Straumann ITI, USA), model 3- Morse taper implant (4.0x10mm) (AR Morse, Conexão, São Paulo, Brazil), model 4- Locking Taper implant (4.0x11mm) (Bicon, USA), model 5- External hexagon implant (4.0x10mm) (Master Screw, Conexão, São Paulo, Brazil). Axial and oblique load (45°) of 150N was applied by a universal testing machine (EMIC-DL 3000) and a circular polariscope was used to visualize the stress. The results were photographed and analyzed qualitatively using a software (AdobePhotoshop). For the axial load, the greatest stress concentration was exhibited in the cervical and apical thirds. However, the highest number of isochromatic fringes was observed in the implant apex and in the cervical adjacent to the load direction in all models for the oblique load. The model 2 (Morse taper, Internal octagon, Straumann ITI/USA) presented the lowest stress concentration while the model 5 (External hexagon, Master screw, Conexão) exhibited the greatest stress. It was concluded: Morse taper implants presented a more favorable stress distribution stress distribution among the test groups. The external hexagon implant showed the highest stress concentration. Oblique load generated the highest stress in all models analyzed.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 12/2011; · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution on external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse taper implant in single and 3-unit implant-supported fixed partial prostheses (FPPs) using photoelasticity. Six models were fabricated with the photoelastic resin PL-2: 3 models for the 3-unit implant-supported FPP with implants of 4.0 × 10.0 mm in the region of the second premolar and molar including 1 model for each type of implant connection, and 3 models for the single prosthesis for each implant type. The prostheses fabrication was standardized. A circular polariscope was used, and axial and oblique (45 degrees) loads of 100 N were applied in a universal testing machine. The results were photographed and analyzed qualitatively. The internal hexagon implant exhibited better stress distribution and lower intensity of fringes followed by the external hexagon and Morse taper implants for the models with the 3-unit prostheses. For the single implants, the Morse taper implant presented better stress distribution, followed by the internal and external hexagon implants. The oblique loading increased the number of photoelastic fringes in all models. It was concluded that the internal hexagon implant exhibited better biomechanical behavior for the 3-unit implant-supported FPP, whereas the Morse taper implant was more favorable for the single implant-supported prosthesis. The oblique loading increased the stress in all models.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 11/2011; 22(6):2060-3. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of different retention systems (screwed or cemented) associated with different prosthetic connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse taper) in 3-unit implant-supported fixed partial dentures through photoelasticity. Six models were fabricated with photoelastic resin PL-2, and each model contained two implants of 4.0 × 10.0 mm. The models presented different retention systems (screwed and cemented) and different connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse taper). The prostheses were standardized and fabricated in Ni-Cr alloy. A circular polariscope was used and axial and oblique (45°) loads of 100 N were applied in a universal testing machine. The results were photographed and analyzed qualitatively with a graphic software (Adobe Photoshop). The screwed retention system exhibited higher number of fringes for both axial and oblique loadings. The internal hexagon implant presented better and lower stress distribution for both cemented and screwed prostheses. The oblique loading increased the number of fringes in all models tested. The cemented retention system presented better stress distribution. The internal hexagon implant was more favorable according to the biomechanical standpoint. The oblique load increased stress in all systems and connections tested.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 08/2011; 37(4):401-10. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the tendency of displacement of the supporting structures of the distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated to the implant with different inclinations of alveolar ridge and implant localizations through a two-dimensional finite-element method. Sixteen mandibular models were fabricated, presenting horizontal, distally descending, distally ascending, or descending-ascending ridges. All models presented the left canine and were rehabilitated with conventional DERPD or implant-retained prosthesis with the ERA system. The models were obtained by the AutoCAD software and transferred to the finite-element software ANSYS 9.0 for analysis. A force of 50 N was applied on the cusp tips of the teeth, with 5 points of loading of 10 N. The results were visualized by displacement maps. For all ridge inclinations, the assembly of the DERPD with distal plate retained by an anterior implant exhibited the lowest requisition of the supporting structures. The highest tendency of displacement occurred in the model with distally ascending ridge with incisal rest. It was concluded that the association of the implant decreased the displacement of the DERPD, and the anterior positioning of the implant associated to the DERPD with the distal plate preserved the supporting structures for all ridges.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 05/2011; 22(3):871-5. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution in implants of regular platforms and of wide diameter with different sizes of hexagon by the three-dimensional finite element method.Materials and methods: We simulated three dimensional models with the aid of the Solidworks 2006 and Rhinoceros 4.0 softwares, for the design of the implant and abutment, and the InVesalius software for the design of the bone. Each model represented a block of bone from the mandibular molar region with an implant 10 mm in length and different diameters. Model A: implant ø3.75 mm/regular hexagon; Model B: implant ø5.00 mm/regular hexagon; Model C: implant ø5.00 mm/expanded hexagon. A load of 200N was applied toward axial, lateral and oblique directions.Results: At implant, applying the load (axial, lateral and oblique), the three models presented stress concentration at the threads in the cervical and middle, the tension was higher for model A. At the abutment, the A and B models showed similar stress distribution, focusing on the coronal and middle third of it; model C showed the highest stresses. On the cortical bone the tensions focused on the cervical for the three models, higher for model A. In the trabecular bone the stresses were less intense and concentrated around the implant body, being more intense for the model A.Conclusion: Among the models of large diameter (models B and C), model B (implant ø5.0 mm/regular hexagon) was more favorable at the distribution of stresses.Model A (implant ø3.75 mm/regular hexagon), presented the s largest areas and the most intense tensions and model B (implant ø5.0 mm/regular hexagon), showed the most favorable stress distribution .The highest stresses were observed in the application of lateral load.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2011; · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The transfer of an intraoral implant position to the cast for an immediate loading implant is an important step and may be difficult to achieve with commonly used transfer and impression methods. Thus, the purpose of this report is to describe a technique for the use of a surgical template to transfer the implant position for fabrication of a provisional restoration. This technique simplifies the procedure, eliminates the need for taking an impression, avoids surgical site contamination, and maintains an adequate emergence profile during fabrication of the definitive restoration. An indexing technique for transferring the position of the implant from the treated surface after extraction is described.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2011; 37(2):267-71. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to perform a photoelastic analysis of stress distribution on straight and angulated implants with different crowns (screwed and cemented). Three models were made of photoelastic resin PL-2: model 1: external hexagon implant 3.75×10.00 mm at 0 degrees; model 2: external hexagon implant 3.75×10.00 mm at 17 degrees; model 3: external hexagon implant 3.75×10.00 mm at 30 degrees. Axial and oblique (45 degrees) load (100 N) was applied with a universal testing machine. The photoelastic fringes on the models were recorded with a digital camera and visualized in a graphic software for qualitative analysis. The axial loading generated the same pattern of stress distribution. The highest stresses were concentrated between medium and apical thirds. The oblique loading generated a similar pattern of stress distribution in the models with similar implant angulation; the highest stress was located on the cervical region opposite to implant angulation and on the apical third. It was concluded that the higher the implant angulation, the higher the stress value, independent of crown type. The screwed prostheses exhibited the highest stress concentration. The oblique load generated higher stress value and concentration than the axial load.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 03/2011; 22(2):434-7. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to use two-dimensional finite element method to evaluate the displacement and stress distribution transmitted by a distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant placed at different inclinations (0, 5, 15, and 30 degrees) in the second molar region of the edentulous mandible ridge. Six hemimandibular models were created: model A, only with the presence of the natural tooth 33; model B, similar to model A, with the presence of a conventional DERPD replacing the missing teeth; model C, similar to the previous model, with a straight implant (0 degrees) in the distal region of the ridge, under the denture base; model D, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 5 degrees in the mesial direction; model E, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 15 degrees in the mesial direction; and model F, similar to ME, with the implant angled at 30 degrees in the mesial direction. The models were created with the use of the AutoCAD 2000 program (Autodesk, Inc, San Rafael, CA) and processed for finite element analysis by the ANSYS 8.0 program (Swanson Analysis Systems, Houston, PA). The force applied was vertical of 50 N on each cusp tip. The results showed that the introduction of the RPD overloaded the supporting structures of the RPD and that the introduction of the implant helped to relieve the stresses of the mucosa alveolar, cortical bone, and trabecular bone. The best stress distribution occurred in model D with the implant angled at 5 degrees. The use of an implant as a support decreased the displacement of alveolar mucosa for all inclinations simulated. The stress distribution transmitted by the DERPD to the supporting structures was improved by the use of straight or slightly inclined implants. According to the displacement analysis and von Mises stress, it could be expected that straight or slightly inclined implants do not represent biomechanical risks to use.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 03/2011; 22(2):663-8. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the platform-switching technique on stress distribution in implant, abutment, and peri-implant tissues, through a 3-dimensional finite element study. Three 3-dimensional mandibular models were fabricated using the SolidWorks 2006 and InVesalius software. Each model was composed of a bone block with one implant 10 mm long and of different diameters (3.75 and 5.00 mm). The UCLA abutments also ranged in diameter from 5.00 mm to 4.1 mm. After obtaining the geometries, the models were transferred to the software FEMAP 10.0 for pre- and postprocessing of finite elements to generate the mesh, loading, and boundary conditions. A total load of 200 N was applied in axial (0°), oblique (45°), and lateral (90°) directions. The models were solved by the software NeiNastran 9.0 and transferred to the software FEMAP 10.0 to obtain the results that were visualized through von Mises and maximum principal stress maps. Model A (implants with 3.75 mm/abutment with 4.1 mm) exhibited the highest area of stress concentration with all loadings (axial, oblique, and lateral) for the implant and the abutment. All models presented the stress areas at the abutment level and at the implant/abutment interface. Models B (implant with 5.0 mm/abutment with 5.0 mm) and C (implant with 5.0 mm/abutment with 4.1 mm) presented minor areas of stress concentration and similar distribution pattern. For the cortical bone, low stress concentration was observed in the peri-implant region for models B and C in comparison to model A. The trabecular bone exhibited low stress that was well distributed in models B and C. Model A presented the highest stress concentration. Model B exhibited better stress distribution. There was no significant difference between the large-diameter implants (models B and C).
    Journal of Oral Implantology 10/2010; 38(5):587-94. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: the aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of different retention systems (screwed or cemented) associated to different prosthetic connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon and morse taper) in 3-unit implant-supported fixed partial prostheses through photoelasticity. Materials and Method: Six models were fabricated with photoelastic resin PL-2 and each model contained two implants of 4.0X10.0mm. The models presented different retention systems (screwed and cemented) and different connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon and morse taper). The prostheses were standardized and fabricated in Ni-Cr alloy. A circular polariscope was used and axial and oblique (45 degrees) loads of 100N were applied in a universal testing machine. The results were photographed and analyzed qualitatively with a software (Adobe Photoshop). Results: The screwed retention system exhibited higher number of fringes for both axial and oblique loadings. The internal hexagon implant presented better and lower stress distribution for both cemented and screwed prostheses. The oblique loading increased the number of fringes in all models tested. Conclusions: The cemented retention system presented better stress distribution. The internal hexagon implant was more favorable according to the biomechanical standpoint. The oblique load increased stress in all systems and connections tested.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 08/2010; · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution of the retention systems (screwed and cemented) for implant-supported fixed partial dentures by means of photoelastic method. Two models were made of photoelastic resin PL-2 with 2 implants (phi = 4.00 x 10 mm) located in the second premolar and molar region in each photoelastic model, varying the retention system (screwed and cemented). The implant-supported fixed partial dentures were standardized and made of Ni-Cr alloy. Axial and oblique (45 degrees) forces of 100 N were applied on the occlusal surface by means of a Universal Testing Machine (EMIC-DL 3000; São José dos Pinhais, Paraná, Brazil). The results were observed and photographed in the field of a circular polariscope and qualitatively analyzed with the aid of computer software (Adobe Photoshop, San Jose, CA). The screw retention system presented the highest number of fringes when the loads were applied on the premolar, pontic, and molar and showed this behavior in all load applications, under axial and oblique loads. It was concluded that there was a better stress distribution and lower magnitude of stress on the cemented implant-supported dentures, under axial and oblique loads. Oblique load caused an increase in stress concentrations in all the models.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 07/2010; 21(4):1110-3. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of a mandibular distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant and different retention system, by bidimensional finite element method. Five hemimandible models with a canine and external hexagon implant at second molar region associated with DERPD were simulated: model A, hemimandible with a canine and a DERPD; model B, hemimandible with a canine and implant with a healing abutment associated to a DERPD; model C, hemimandible with a canine and implant with an ERA attachment associated to a DERPD; model D, hemimandible with a canine and implant with an O'ring attachment associated to a DERPD; and model E, hemimandible with a canine and implant-supported prosthesis associated to a DERPD. Cusp tips were loaded with 50 N of axial or oblique force (45 degrees). Finite element analysis was performed in ANSYS 9.0. model E showed the higher displacement and overload in the supporting tissues; the patterns of stress distribution around the dental apex of models B, C, and D were similar. The association between a DERPD and an osseointegrated implant using the ERA or O'ring systems shows lower stress values. Oblique forces showed higher stress values and displacement. Oblique forces increased the displacement and stress levels in all models; model C displayed the best stress distribution in the supporting structures; healing abutment, ERA, and O'ring systems were viable with RPD, but DERPD association with a single implant-supported prosthesis was nonviable.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 05/2010; 21(3):727-34. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of platform switching implants using a photoelastic method. Three models were constructed of the photoelastic resin PL-2, with a single implant and a screw-retained implant-supported prosthesis. These models were Model A, platform 5.0 mm/abutment 4.1 mm; Model B, platform 4.1 mm/abutment 4.1 mm; and Model C, platform 5.00 mm/abutment 5.00 mm. Axial and oblique (45°) loads of 100 N were applied using a Universal Testing Machine (EMIC DL 3000). Images were photographed with a digital camera and visualized with software (AdobePhotoshop) to facilitate the qualitative analysis. The highest stress concentrations were observed at the apical third of the 3 models. With the oblique load, the highest stress concentrations were located at the implant apex, opposite the load application. Stress concentrations decreased in the cervical region of Model A (platform switching), and Models A (platform switching) and C (conventional/wide-diameter) displayed similar stress magnitudes. Finally, Model B (conventional/regular diameter) displayed the highest stress concentrations of the models tested.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 01/2010; 36(6):419-24. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to use photoelastic models to analyze the distribution of stress caused by the incidence of loads on a mandibular distal extension removable partial denture, both on the abutment teeth and on differently shaped residual ridges: distal ascending, descending-ascending, horizontal and distal descending. The best type of retainer and location of the rest on the last abutment tooth were determined for the different types of ridge. Four models were made from photoelastic resin (PL-1 for the teeth and PL-2 for the alveolar ridge), one for each kind of ridge. For each model, 4 removable partial dentures (RPD) were made (16 RPD altogether): T-bar retainer and distal rest, T-bar retainer and mesial rest, circumferential retainer and distal rest, and circumferential retainer and mesial rest. The models were placed on a circular polariscope and a 100 N axial load (point load) was applied to premolars and molars of the RPD. The formation of photoelastic bands was photographed for qualitative analysis. Results showed that the horizontal ridge had better distribution of stress, while the distal descending ridge had greater concentration of stress. The circumferential retainer had greater areas of stress for all types of ridges except the horizontal ridge, where there was no influence related to retainer type. The distribution of stress was similar among the different types of ridges when the rest was mesial or distal to the last abutment tooth, except for the distal descending ridge, where there was greater concentration of stress when the rest was located distally to the last abutment tooth. Thus, it may be concluded that (1) the situation was least favorable for the distal descending ridge and most favorable for the horizontal ridge, (2) the T-bar retainer had more favorable stress distribution, except when the ridge was horizontal, in which case there was no influence in relation to the type of retainer, (3) the location of the rest showed similar behavior in all except the distal descending ridge.
    Acta odontológica latinoamericana: AOL 01/2010; 23(1):68-73.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the Shore A hardness and color stability of two soft lining materials after thermocycling and when chemical polishing was used or omitted. Two acrylic-based soft lining materials were tested: Coe-Soft and Soft Confort, 14 specimens were made for each material. They were distributed in four groups according to the treatment performed. The specimens were thermocycled (1000 cycles) and half of the group submitted to chemical polishing (methyl methacrylate). Shore A hardness was determined and color stability was calculated by means of Commission International de l'Eclairage Lab uniform color scale using a spectrophotometer, the measurements were made immediately after deflasked, chemical polishing and thermocycling. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's tests were performed at p < 0.01. Color changes (deltaE) were observed after thermocycling in both soft lining materials: Soft Confort (10.60) showed significantly higher values than Coe-Soft (4.57). Coe-Soft (26.42) showed higher Shore A hardness values than Soft Confort (19.42). Chemical polishing did not influence in the color stability of both materials; however, influenced in the hardness values of Coe-Soft.
    Acta odontológica latinoamericana: AOL 01/2009; 22(1):63-8.