R J Plug

Leiden University, Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (9)25.48 Total impact

  • Hemoglobin 06/2002; 26(2):181-4. · 0.89 Impact Factor
  • Hemoglobin 09/2001; 25(3):331-6. · 0.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eight patients who were carriers of beta-thalassemia induced by the cd121 (G-->T) mutation are described in four nonrelated Dutch families. This mutant, which is considered rare and inherited in a dominant manner, is expressed in a different way among each of the four families and even among carriers of the same family. The symptoms vary from an hemolytic anemia of intermediate gravity with hepatosplenomegaly, inclusion bodies and erythroblastosis, to a mild anemia with minor hematological abnormalities. We report the analytical procedures used for the detection of the mutant, the hematological and clinical data of the four families and discuss the variable physiopathology of this molecular defect. We also compare the variation in fetal hemoglobin expression in relation to the haplotypes of the beta-gene cluster and to the different hematological conditions. The presence of this rare mutant in four nonrelated Dutch families could derive from a single mutation or from multiple events. The existence of the four mutations in three different haplotypes suggests the occurrence of at least two independent events. The presence of five abnormal hemoglobins and the beta-thalassemia defect on different haplotypes at cd121 also suggests a relatively increased rate of mutations at this particular site.
    Annals of Hematology 01/1999; 77(6):249-55. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a family with beta thalassaemia, apparently not linked to the beta-globin gene cluster, in combination with alpha thalassaemia. The propositus, an adult Dutch Caucasian male, and his son presented with microcytic hypochromic parameters. Their lysates displayed the normal adult pattern on electrophoresis. The HbA2 concentration, which is usually increased in beta thalassaemia, was normal. The in vitro biosynthetic rate of the globin chains was strongly unbalanced even in the presence of a coexisting alpha-thalassaemia defect. Routine analysis of the beta genes, including the promoter region, was performed repeatedly by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGCE) and direct sequencing. No molecular abnormalities were detected. Large beta deletions were excluded by haplotype determination, using seven polymorphic markers distributed over an area of 50 kb, from 1 kb 5' of the epsilon gene to 4 kb 3' of the beta gene. The haplotype analysis of the beta-gene cluster revealed that the unaffected daughter had received the same beta haplotype as her beta-thalassaemic brother from their beta-thalassaemic father. These data suggest that the beta-gene cluster shared by father and son was not directly associated with a reduced beta-globin chain expression. In order to exclude the remote possibility of a beta-locus-control region (LCR) rearrangement in the paternal haplotype of the daughter, the sequence of the HS2 element was examined in the nuclear family. We compared the haematological and clinical data of this family with the data reported in the limited number of similar cases. We discuss the possibility that the mutation of a trans-acting erythroid factor(s), not linked to the beta-genes cluster, may impair the beta-gene expression of both alleles.
    British Journal of Haematology 12/1998; 103(2):370-6. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The first case of haemoglobin H (HbH) disease in combination with haemoglobin C (HbC) is reported in a man of Surinamese origin. Only haemoglobin A (HbA) and HbC were detected by electrophoresis. The amount of HbC was much less than expected in HbC heterozygotes. The synthesis ratio (beta A+ beta C/alpha) indicated an alpha-thalassaemia defect with two non-functional alpha genes, which did not correlate with the degree of haemolysis and anaemia displayed by the patient. The DNA analysis of the alpha-genes clusters revealed a defect combination -SEA/-alpha 3.7. The haematological data and the physiopathology of this atypical case are compared with the typical HbH disease found in a first cousin of the propositus. Data on the globin chains expression and on the formation of beta A and beta C homotetramers in HbH/HbC disease are presented.
    British Journal of Haematology 04/1997; 96(4):801-5. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Germline mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal dominant predisposition to colorectal cancer. We screened the entire coding region of the APC gene for mutations in an unselected series of 105 Dutch FAP kindreds. For the analysis of exons 1-14, we employed the GC-clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), while the large exon 15 was examined using the protein truncation test. Using this approach, we identified 65 pathogenic mutations in the above 105 apparently unrelated FAP families. The mutations were predominantly either frameshifts (39/65) or single base substitutions (18/65), resulting in premature stop codons. Mutations that would predict abnormal RNA splicing were identified in seven cases. In one of the families, a nonconservative amino acid change was found to segregate with the disease. In spite of the large number of APC mutations reported to date, we identified 27 novel germline mutations in our patients, which reiterates the great heterogeneity of the mutation spectrum in FAP. In addition to the point mutations identified in our patients, structural rearrangements of APC were found in two pedigrees, by Southern blot analysis. The present study indicates that the combined use of DGGE, protein truncation test, and Southern blot analysis offers an efficient strategy for the presymptomatic diagnosis of FAP by direct mutation detection. We found that the combined use of the currently available molecular approaches still fails to identify the underlying genetic defect in a significant subset of the FAP families. The possible causes for this limitation are discussed.
    Human Mutation 02/1997; 9(1):7-16. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined six individuals from a two-generation Dutch family for a suspected hemoglobin (Hb) abnormality. The propositus presented with polycythemia and complained of persistent weakness, headache, and epistaxis. All family members initially showed a normal Hb-electrophoretic pattern, but on isoelectric focusing, three of them displayed a fast-moving band associated with high packed red cell volumes (PCV) and increased red blood cell count. The Hb mutant was analyzed at the DNA level by specific gene fragment amplification (PCR), followed by direct DNA sequencing, and the mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. We found a C-->G transversion (CAC-->CAG) at codon 97 of the beta-chain, which corresponded to the His-->Gln amino acid substitution previously described as Hb Malmö. We report here the clinical history of the patient, the effects of phlebotomy treatment, and the effect of subnormal iron conditions on the erythropoietic recovery after phlebotomy. The mechanism responsible for the induction of the higher oxygen affinity is discussed, as are some aspects concerning the occurrence, pathology treatment, and the genetic risk of Hb variants with high O2 affinity.
    Annals of Hematology 11/1996; 73(4):183-8. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined six individuals from a two-generation Dutch family for a suspected hemoglobin (Hb) abnormality. The propositus presented with polycythemia and complained of persistent weakness, headache, and epistaxis. All family members initially showed a normal Hb-electrophoretic pattern, but on isoelectric focusing, three of them displayed a fast-moving band associated with high packed red cell volumes (PCV) and increased red blood cell count. The Hb mutant was analyzed at the DNA level by specific gene fragment amplification (PCR), followed by direct DNA sequencing, and the mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. We found a C→G transversion (CAC→CAG) at codon 97 of the β-chain, which corresponded to the His→Gln amino acid substitution previously described as Hb Malmö. We report here the clinical history of the patient, the effects of phlebotomy treatment, and the effect of subnormal iron conditions on the erythropoietic recovery after phlebotomy. The mechanism responsible for the induction of the higher oxygen affinity is discussed, as are some aspects concerning the occurrence, pathology, treatment, and the genetic risk of Hb variants with high O2 affinity.
    Annals of Hematology 01/1996; 73(4):183-188. · 2.87 Impact Factor