Fabio Casati

Università degli Studi di Trento, Trento, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy

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Publications (271)81.07 Total impact

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    Dataset: CSS-Demo
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    Beatrice Valeri, Marcos Baez, Fabio Casati
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    Beatrice Valeri, Marcos Baez, Fabio Casati
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present a social platform that empowers real-life social experiences by using the crowd to help people discover interesting events around a particular location and make the best of the actual experience. We demonstrate how current systems cover only partially the social and individual motivations on deciding and teaming up for events, and propose i) a system of implicit and explicit incentives that rewards intention and experience sharing within circles based on friendship or interests and ii) a discovery algorithm that combines the impor-tance of coming along with friends with the personal interests to recommend events. The resulting platform has been applied to generic events as well as domain-specific ones such as shows in movie theaters.
    CollaborateCom 2012; 10/2012
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    ABSTRACT: The recent emergence of mashup tools has refueled research on end-user development, i.e., on enabling end-users without programming skills to compose their own applications. Yet, similar to what happened with analogous promises in web service composition and business process management, research has mostly focused on technology and, as a consequence, has failed its objective. Plain technology (e.g., SOAP/WSDL web services) or simple modeling languages (e.g., Yahoo! Pipes) don't convey enough meaning to non-programmers. In this article, we propose a domain-specific approach to mashups that "speaks the language of the user", i.e., that is aware of the terminology, concepts, rules, and conventions (the domain) the user is comfortable with. We show what developing a domain-specific mashup tool means, which role the mashup meta-model and the domain model play and how these can be merged into a domain-specific mashup meta-model. We exemplify the approach by implementing a mashup tool for a specific scenario (research evaluation) and describe the respective user study. The results of a first user study confirm that domain-specific mashup tools indeed lower the entry barrier to mashup development.
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    ABSTRACT: Workflow management systems focus on the coordination of people and work items, service composition approaches on the coordination of service invocations, and, recently, web mashups have started focusing on the integration and coordination of pieces of user interfaces (UIs), e.g., a Google map, inside simple web pages. While these three approaches have evolved in a rather isolated fashion - although they can be seen as evolution of the componentization and coordination idea from people to services to UIs - in this paper we describe a component-based development paradigm that conciliates the core strengths of these three approaches inside a single model and language. We call this new paradigm distributed UI orchestration, so as to reflect the mashup-like and process-based nature of our target applications. In order to aid developers in implementing UI orchestrations, we equip the described model and language with suitable design, deployment, and runtime instruments, covering the whole life cycle of distributed UI orchestrations. (c) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Information Systems 09/2012; DOI:10.1016/j.is.2011.08.001 · 1.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent emergence of mashup tools has refueled research on end user development, i.e., on enabling end-users without programming skills to compose their own applications. Yet, similar to what happened with analogous promises in web service composition and business process management, research has mostly focused on technology and, as a consequence, has failed its objective. In this paper, we propose a domain-specific approach to mashups that is aware of the terminology, concepts, rules, and conventions (the domain) the user is comfortable with. We show what developing a domain-specific mashup tool means, which role the mashup meta-model and the domain model play and how these can be merged into a domain-specific mashup meta-model. We exemplify the approach by implementing a mashup tool for a specific domain (research evaluation) and describe the respective user study. The results of the user study confirm that domain-specific mashup tools indeed lower the entry barrier to mashup development.
    The International Conference on Web Engineering (ICWE); 07/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Given their increasing popularity and novel requirements and characteristics, telco mashups deserve an analysis that goes beyond what's available for mashups in general. Here, the authors cluster telco services into different types, analyze their features, derive a telco mashup reference architecture, and survey how well existing mashup tools can respond to these mashups' novel needs.
    IEEE Internet Computing 06/2012; 16(3):70-76. DOI:10.1109/MIC.2012.19 · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this demonstration, we present ResEval Mash, a mashup platform for research evaluation, i.e., for the assessment of the productivity or quality of researchers, teams, institutions, journals, and the like – a topic most of us are acquainted with. The platform is specifically tailored to the need of sourcing data about scientific publications and researchers from the Web, aggregating them, computing metrics (also complex and ad-hoc ones), and visualizing them. ResEval Mash is a hosted mashup platform with a client-side editor and runtime engine, both running inside a common web browser. It supports the processing of also large amounts of data, a feature that is achieved via the sensible distribution of the respective computation steps over client and server. Our preliminary user study shows that ResEval Mash indeed has the power to enable domain experts to develop own mashups (research evaluation metrics); other mashup platforms rather support skilled developers. The reason for this success is ResEval Mash's domain-specificity.
    World Wide Web (WWW); 05/2012
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The recent emergence of mashup tools has refueled research on end user development, i.e., on enabling end users without programming skills to compose own applications. Yet, simi-lar to what happened with analogous promises in web service composition and business process management, research has mostly focused on technology and, as a consequence, has failed its objective. Plain technology (e.g., SOAP/WSDL web services) or simple modeling languages (e.g., Yahoo! Pipes) don't convey enough meaning to non-programmers. We propose a domain-specific approach to mashups that "speaks the language of the user", i.e., that is aware of the terminology, concepts, rules, and conventions (the domain) the user is comfortable with. We show what developing a domain-specific mashup tool means, which role the mashup meta-model and the domain model play and how these can be merged into a domain-specific mashup meta-model. We apply the approach implementing a mashup tool for the re-search evaluation domain. Our user study confirms that domain-specific mashup tools indeed lower the entry barrier to mashup development.
    World Wide Web (WWW); 05/2012
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    ABSTRACT: End-user development (i.e., enabling end-users without programming skills to build their own applications) is undergoing a revolution, as mashups are widely considered to be the most appealing development tool for the situational, short-span applications. Plain technology (e.g., SOAP/WSDL web services) or simple modeling languages (e.g., Yahoo! Pipes) don't convey enough meaning to non-programmers. In this paper, we propose a domain-specific approach to mashups that speaks the language of the user", i.e., that is aware of the terminology, concepts, rules, and conventions (the domain) the user is comfortable with. We exemplify the approach by implementing a mashup tool for a specific domain (research evaluation) and describe the respective user study. The results of a first user study confirm that domain-specific mashup tools indeed lower the entry barrier to mashup development.
    The ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI); 05/2012
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    Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering 01/2012; DOI:10.1109/ICSE.2012.6227080
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    B Valeri, F Casati, M Baez, R Boast
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the emergence of mashup tools like Yahoo! Pipes or JackBe Presto Wires, developing mashups is still non-trivial and requires intimate knowledge about the functionality of web APIs and services, their interfaces, parameter settings, data mappings, and so on. We aim to assist the mashup process and to turn it into an interactive co-creation process, in which one part of the solution comes from the developer and the other part from reusable composition knowledge that has proven successful in the past. We harvest composition knowledge from a repository of existing mashup models by mining a set of reusable composition patterns, which we then use to interactively provide composition recommendations to developers while they model their own mashup. Upon acceptance of a recommendation, the purposeful design of the respective pattern types allows us to automatically weave the chosen pattern into a partial mashup model, in practice performing a set of modeling actions on behalf of the developer. The experimental evaluation of our prototype implementation demonstrates that it is indeed possible to harvest meaningful, reusable knowledge from existing mashups, and that even complex recommendations can be efficiently queried and weaved also inside the client browser.
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    ABSTRACT: This demo introduces Eventifier, a tool that helps in recon-structing an event log from operational databases upon which process instances have been executed. The purpose of reconstructing such event log is that of discovering process models out of it, and, hence, the tool targets researches and practitioners interested in process mining. The aim of this demo is to convey to the participants both the conceptual and practical implications of identifying and extracting process execution events from such databases for reconstructing ready-to-use event logs for process discovery.
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    ABSTRACT: Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks (WSNs) are distributed sensor and actuator networks that monitor and control real-world phenomena, enabling the integration of the physical with the virtual world. They are used in domains like building automation, control systems, remote healthcare, etc., which are all highly process-driven. Today, tools and insights of Business Process Modeling (BPM) are not used to model WSN logic, as BPM focuses mostly on the coordination of people and IT systems and neglects the integration of embedded IT. WSN development still requires significant special-purpose, low-level, and manual coding of process logic. By exploiting similarities between WSN applications and business processes, this work aims to create a holistic system enabling the modeling and execution of executable processes that integrate, coordinate, and control WSNs. Concretely, we present a WSN-specific extension for Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) and a compiler that transforms the extended BPMN models into WSN-specific code to distribute process execution over both a WSN and a standard business process engine. The developed tool-chain allows modeling of an independent control loop for the WSN.
    BPM 2012; 01/2012
  • 5th Int. Workshop on Business Process Management and Social Software (BPMS2’12); 01/2012
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    I K Far, P Silveira, F Casati, M Baez
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    ABSTRACT: The industrial adoption of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is hampered by two main factors. First, there is a lack of integration of WSNs with business process back-ends. Second, programming WSNs is still challenging as it is mainly performed at the operating system level. To this end, we provide makeSense – a unified programming framework and a compilation chain that, from high-level business process specifications, generates code ready for deployment on WSN nodes.
    9th European Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks, Trento, Italy; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Among the many factors that affect wellbeing, social relationships are undoubtedly one of the most important ones. As we grow old, however, our abil-ity to maintain and nurture them is challenged by a wide range of age-related changes that hinder our perceptual, cognitive and psychomotor capabilities. In this paper, we present a mobile communication platform specifically designed to foster social interactions between elderly users and their friends and family. To validate our solution and gain further understanding of the needs of elderly from a design perspective, a "think aloud" study was conducted, investigating the usabil-ity and applicability of our solution. This study and its results are described in this paper, showing how a simple, almost featureless, interface is suitable for the old-est group of users and informing our design about different interaction issues to take into account for the future development of our platform.
    FOSIBLE Workshop. 10th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems; 01/2012
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    EWSN 2012; 01/2012

Publication Stats

8k Citations
81.07 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2015
    • Università degli Studi di Trento
      • Department of Information Engineering and Computer Science
      Trento, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
  • 2007
    • University of New South Wales
      • School of Computer Science and Engineering
      Kensington, New South Wales, Australia
    • University of South Wales
      Понтиприте, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 1999–2007
    • FX Palo Alto Laboratory
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 1970–2007
    • Hewlett-Packard
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 1998–1999
    • Politecnico di Milano
      • Department of Electronics, Information, and Bioengineering
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy