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Publications (11)19.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast and contrast-enhanced cone beam breast Computed Tomography (CT) in demonstrating malignant breast lesions in the diagnostic setting. This Institutional Review Board approved, Health Information Portability and Accountability Act compliant, prospective study enrolled BI-RADS four and five patients from 2008 to 2010. Eighty-seven subjects had noncontrast breast CT, 42 had contrast-enhanced breast CT (CE-breast CT) with 70 pathologically confirmed cancer diagnoses. All 70 comprise the study cohort for noncontrast breast CT, and 23 who had CE-breast CT comprise the cohort for CE-breast CT. All had diagnostic work-up. Patient age, breast density, lesion size and characteristics, biopsy method, and core pathology were recorded. A Fisher's exact test was used to detect a difference in detectability. For agreement in size measurement between the imaging modalities, a paired t-test was employed. Reported p-values were based on 2-sided tests. Two one-sided tests were calculated to determine equivalence within ±0.3 cm at a 90% significance level. Noncontrast breast CT identified 67 of 70 malignant lesions, detected by diagnostic work-up. CE-breast CT identified 23 of 23 index malignant lesions and in addition, found three malignant lesions in three cases not previously detected. Noncontrast breast CT demonstrated the index lesion in 67 of 70 cases and CE-breast CT demonstrated the index lesion in all 23 cases. An additional three new malignant lesions not seen with conventional diagnostic work-up were detected. In this preliminary study, breast CT with or without contrast was shown to be accurate at identifying malignant breast lesions in the diagnostic setting.
    The Breast Journal 06/2014; · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare invasive breast cancer in patients in their 40s with and without a family history of breast cancer as well as the lymph node meta-static rate and mastectomy rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS. From 2000 to 2011, a total of 793,827 examinations were performed; 221,541 (28%) were women between 40 and 49 years old. A total of 6965 cancers were found in 6511 patients. Specifically, 1207 cancers (17.3%) were detected in 1162 patients in their 40s. Patients presenting for diagnostic evaluation and those with a personal history of breast cancer were excluded, leaving 388 cancers available for study; 238 (61%) cancers were in patients with no family history of breast cancer, and 150 (39%) were in patients with a family history of breast cancer. Pearson chi-square, Fisher exact, and Student t tests were used for between-group comparisons for qualitative data. A two-sided p value was reported for all tests. RESULTS. The difference in lesions detected by imaging was not statistically significant (p = 0.17); 65% (154/238) had invasive and 35% (84/238) noninvasive disease in the no family history of breast cancer group and 65% (98/150) and 35% (52/150), respectively, in the family history of breast cancer group (p = 0.90). The mastectomy rate was not statistically significantly different (p = 0.14). Fifteen percent (35/238) of the no family history of breast cancer patients and 12% (18/150) of the family history of breast cancer patients had positive lymph nodes (p = 0.45). CONCLUSION. In patients in their 40s with or without a family history of breast cancer, no differences were detected in the proportion of invasive versus noninvasive cancers diagnosed, lymph node metastases, or mastectomy rates. Screening mammography should be performed in this age group regardless of family history.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 04/2014; 202(4):928-32. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate compression elasticity imaging in combination with standard B-mode imaging for assessment of benign versus malignant breast lesions and correlation with needle biopsy. Methods Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, and patients were prospectively enrolled from 2007 to 2011. A total of 221 patients yielding 230 elastograms recommended for biopsy were the basis of this analysis. Information collected included patient demographics, lesion laterality and location, and needle biopsy method and results. The longest dimension of the lesion between B-mode and elasticity imaging was measured, and an elasticity imaging/B mode ratio of 1.0 or greater was considered to represent malignancy; a ratio of less than 1.0 was benign. Statistical analysis included calculation of descriptive statistics and generation of figures. Results Of the 230 biopsies performed, cancer was revealed in 100 cases (43.5%). One hundred thirty (56.5%) benign findings were observed. Of the 100 malignant lesions, 99 had an elasticity imaging/B-mode ratio greater than or equal to 1.0 (99.0%). Of the 130 benign lesions, 119 had an elasticity imaging/B-mode ratio of less than 1.0 (91.5%). These results indicate 99.0% (99 of 100) sensitivity and 91.5% (119 of 130) specificity. Furthermore, we found a positive predictive value of 90.0% (99 of 110) and a negative predictive value of 99.2% (119 of 120). Conclusions In this study, elasticity imaging had high sensitivity for malignant and benign lesions. Elasticity imaging in the clinical setting may prove to be an additional tool that is helpful to the breast clinician for characterization of lesions as benign or malignant. At this time, we are continuing our data collection because additional research is still necessary.
    Journal of ultrasound in medicine: official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine 02/2013; 32(2):297-302. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate papillary lesions of the breast diagnosed at needle core biopsy and the outcomes of follow-up imaging and surgical findings. METHODS: Retrospective review of 13,806 needle core biopsies performed from 2004 to 2010 revealed 352 patients with 368 papillary lesions; 137 of these lesions underwent surgical excision and 215 had a minimum of 2 year imaging follow-up. Outcomes of imaging follow-up and underestimation of carcinoma by comparison to surgical excision, as applicable, were determined. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, BI-RADS(®) breast density, palpability, biopsy methods, number of specimens, and pathology were recorded. A two-tailed Fisher exact test was used to assess associations between biopsy techniques and the results of surgical excision as well as the association between palpability and the results of surgical excision. SAS(®) V 9.1.3 was used to perform the calculations. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-seven lesions proceeded to surgical excision. A total of 28 lesions were underestimated; 21 of these were underestimated carcinomas. When comparing biopsy devices in the underestimated group, 64 % were biopsied with directional vacuum-assisted devices and 36 % with automated large core devices (p < 0.0706). In total 18 % of the palpable lesions were underestimated, whereas 17 % of the nonpalpable lesions were underestimated (p < 0.6560); this was not a significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, carcinoma was underestimated at needle biopsy in 6 % (21/368) of papillary lesions diagnosed when compared to surgical excision. In cases that underwent excision, 34 % (47/137) revealed carcinoma; 45 % (21/47) of these were underestimated carcinomas. Lesion palpability and biopsy method did not affect underestimation in this study population.
    Breast Cancer 04/2012; · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of our study was to show the importance of surgical excision after the diagnosis of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) based on needle core biopsy. Retrospective evaluation of all cases of LCIS diagnosed at needle core biopsy from 2000 to 2011 was performed; 60 patients with 64 diagnoses of LCIS comprise the cohort. Data recorded included patient demographics, patient presentation, breast density, personal and family histories of breast cancer, lesion characteristics, biopsy method, and correlation of core results with surgical pathology or follow-up imaging. The pathology facility was recorded for all biopsies because the specimens from open surgical biopsy were frequently reviewed by a different laboratory. A total of 60 patients with 64 diagnoses of LCIS comprised the study cohort. The patients ranged in age from 36 to 93 years (average, 55 years). The lesions consisted of 39 calcifications, two masses with calcium, 10 masses, two asymmetries, two architectural distortions, two architectural distortions with calcifications, and seven MRI enhancements. Mammography detected lesions in 84% of the cases (n = 54) and 16% (n = 10) were not visualized. Sonography detected lesions in 30% of the cases (n = 19) and 70% (n = 45) were sonographically occult. Needle core biopsy was performed in all cases: 49 stereotactic biopsies (77%), 12 ultrasound-guided biopsies, and three MRI-guided biopsies. All but one case proceeded to surgery. Open surgical biopsy revealed 21 cancers (33%); of the remaining cases, 53% of the cases (n = 33) were atypical or high risk and 14% (n = 9) were benign. The diagnosis of LCIS at needle core biopsy, in this small study, revealed that 84% of lesions either were malignant or were atypical or high risk at surgery, of which 33% were found to be carcinoma. Our findings suggest that LCIS should be excised when noted at core biopsy.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 02/2012; 198(2):281-7. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite developments in surgical technique, radiation treatment, and chemotherapeutic agents, tumor recurrence and distant disease have remained a major concern in breast cancer management. Breast imaging after mastectomy in the screening arena remains a controversial topic for breast imagers. Many feel the yield of finding a recurrent cancer with imaging in the asymptomatic patient is too low to be beneficial; others believe imaging should be performed on these patients as the risk of recurrence exists. Patients after a mastectomy procedure are considered high risk and, when they present with clinical symptoms, will require evaluation by the radiologist. In this diagnostic/symptomatic scenario, imaging becomes the routine and current imaging tools, such as mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can easily be incorporated to diagnose recurrent cancer. Our facility has a large population of patients that undergo mastectomy after a carcinoma diagnosis as well as a number of patients that have undergone a mastectomy procedure because of their high-risk status (whether family history or genetic predisposition). A certain percentage of these patients have proceeded to reconstructive surgery. We image these patients routinely as part of our screening protocol. Over the years we have become familiar with the appearance of remaining tissue along the chest wall after mastectomy as well as the reconstructed breasts. This familiarity is important as the imaging of these patients with mammography and other modalities available today can be challenging. This manuscript will discuss the benefits and some limitations surrounding imaging these patients, in both the asymptomatic and symptomatic scenarios, as well as what imaging protocols can be integrated within a facility's standard evaluation.
    Breast Cancer 06/2011; 18(4):259-67. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical implementation of needle core biopsies has given radiologists an invaluable tool for the diagnostic evaluation of suspicious breast lesions. Despite improvements made to the technology of breast biopsy, the underestimation of disease in tissue samples retrieved continues. This can be attributed to many factors, including variability between different needle gauges. This study was undertaken to assess the pathological underestimation for 9 and 12 gauge breast needle core biopsies at surgical excision. A retrospective review of image-guided consecutive core needle biopsies performed from 2003 to 2006 yielded a total of 1,201 needle core biopsies: 837 twelve gauge and 364 nine gauge. Further analysis was completed to distinguish needle biopsies whose pathological outcome was underestimated at core needle biopsy when compared to their subsequent surgical excision. Ninety-seven lesions in 88 patients were reviewed and comprise the study cohort. Underestimation was found in 97 needle core procedures in 88 patients. Of the 97, 67 were performed with 12 gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy devices and 30 with 9 gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy devices, resulting in an underestimation rate of 8.00 and 8.24% for 12 gauge and 9 gauge, respectively. The difference in underestimation rate was not statistically significant per Pearson's chi squared test (P = 0.8898). In this analysis, the underestimation of needle biopsy results with surgical pathology was found to be 8.00% for the 12 gauge group and 8.24% for the 9 gauge group. These results support our current clinical practice of utilizing either needle gauge.
    Breast Cancer 03/2010; 18(1):42-50. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Problems associated with the large file sizes of digital mammograms have impeded the integration of digital mammography with picture archiving and communications systems. Digital mammograms irreversibly compressed by the novel wavelet Access Over Network (AON) compression algorithm were compared with lossless-compressed digital mammograms in a blinded reader study to evaluate the perceived sufficiency of irreversibly compressed images for comparison with next-year mammograms. Fifteen radiologists compared the same 100 digital mammograms in three different comparison modes: lossless-compressed vs 20:1 irreversibly compressed images (mode 1), lossless-compressed vs 40:1 irreversibly compressed images (mode 2), and 20:1 irreversibly compressed images vs 40:1 irreversibly compressed images (mode 3). Compression levels were randomly assigned between monitors. For each mode, the less compressed of the two images was correctly identified no more frequently than would occur by chance if all images were identical in compression. Perceived sufficiency for comparison with next-year mammograms was achieved by 97.37% of the lossless-compressed images and 97.37% of the 20:1 irreversibly compressed images in mode 1, 97.67% of the lossless-compressed images and 97.67% of the 40:1 irreversibly compressed images in mode 2, and 99.33% of the 20:1 irreversibly compressed images and 99.19% of the 40:1 irreversibly compressed images in mode 3. In a random-effect analysis, the irreversibly compressed images were found to be noninferior to the lossless-compressed images. Digital mammograms irreversibly compressed by the wavelet AON compression algorithm were as frequently judged sufficient for comparison with next-year mammograms as lossless-compressed digital mammograms.
    Journal of Digital Imaging 02/2010; 24(1):66-74. · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and efficacy of second-look breast sonography in the evaluation of abnormalities identified on presurgical breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. A retrospective review was performed of 152 presurgical breast MRI examinations having 196 unsuspected abnormalities to identify findings that underwent subsequent breast sonography. Eligible examinations had a suspicious abnormality identified on presurgical MRI and documentation of the location and size of the finding on MRI and subsequent second-look sonography. Fourteen examinations not meeting the criteria were excluded, with 182 abnormalities remaining. Patient medical records were reviewed. Seventy percent (128 of 182) of breast MRI lesions were visible at second-look sonography; 30% (54 of 182) were sonographically occult. Ninety-five percent (121 of 128) of sonographically visible abnormalities underwent breast biopsy. Pathologic examinations of sampled sonographically visible lesions revealed 39 cancers, 9 high-risk lesions, 72 benign lesions, and 1 lesion not specified at surgery; 23% (9 of 128) of cancers were in the contralateral breast. Fifty-four lesions were sonographically occult. Needle biopsy was performed for 93% (50 of 54) of occult lesions, revealing 8 cancers, 1 high-risk lesion, and 41 benign lesions; 3 of the benign lesions did not have sufficient pathologic specimens but were benign at follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging guidance was used in 86% (43 of 50) of these biopsies. One contralateral cancer was identified in the sonographically occult subset. Of the 182 lesions that underwent second-look sonography, 20% (36 of 182) had a change in management. Second-look sonography has value in the evaluation of abnormalities found on breast MRI. We found enhancements in 70% (128 of 182), yielding 39 cancers.
    Journal of ultrasound in medicine: official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine 10/2009; 28(10):1337-46. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A retrospective evaluation of the ability of computer-aided detection (CAD) ability to identify breast carcinoma in standard mammographic projections. Forty-five biopsy proven lesions in 44 patients imaged digitally with CAD applied at examination were reviewed. Forty-four screening BIRADS category 1 digital mammography examinations were randomly identified to serve as a comparative normal/control population. Data included patient age; BIRADS breast density; lesion type, size, and visibility; number, type, and location of CAD marks per image; CAD ability to mark lesions; needle core and surgical pathologic correlation. The CAD lesion/case sensitivity of 87% (n = 39), image sensitivity of 69% (n = 31) for mediolateral oblique view and 78% (n = 35) for the craniocaudal view was found. The average false positive rate in 44 normal screening cases was 2.0 (range 1-8). The 2.0 figure is based on 88 reported false positive CAD marks in 44 normal screening exams: 98% (n = 44) lesions proceeded to excision; initial pathology upgraded at surgical excision from in situ to invasive disease in 24% (n = 9) lesions. CAD demonstrated potential to detect mammographically visible cancers in standard projections for all lesion types.
    International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery 06/2009; 4(4):331-6. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of our study was to compare the bleeding complication rates after core needle biopsy in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy and those who had not to assess the safety of performing core needle breast biopsy in anticoagulated patients. Core needle biopsy was performed at 1,144 sites in 1,055 women from August 2004 to May 2007. A retrospective study of these cases was performed. The patient group was composed of 200 women (220 biopsy sites) who were taking anticoagulant therapy daily (180 patients, aspirin; 16 patients, warfarin; and four patients, Excedrin), and the control group was composed of 855 women (924 biopsy sites) who were not receiving daily anticoagulant therapy. Any adverse reactions after core needle biopsy, including the presence and size of bruises or lumps (hematomas), were recorded. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.035) in the percentage of bruises between patients receiving anticoagulation therapy and those who were not. Bruising occurred in 68 of the 200 (34%) women in the patient group (anticoagulated), whereas bruising occurred in 227 of the 855 (26.5%) women in the control group (nonanticoagulated). The differences were not statistically significant for hematoma formation (p = 0.274) or bruising with hematoma formation (p = 0.413). Hematoma occurred in 12 of the 200 (6%) anticoagulated patients versus 36 of the 855 (4.2%) patients in the control group. Patients reporting a bruise and lump (hematoma) numbered 10 of 200 (5%) for the anticoagulated group and 32 of 855 (3.7%) for the control group. No patients undergoing core needle biopsy reported any clinically important complications. The results of this study confirm that performing core needle biopsy in patients on anticoagulation therapy is safe.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 11/2008; 191(4):1194-7. · 2.90 Impact Factor