P Florou-Paneri

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloníki, Kentriki Makedonia, Greece

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Publications (33)27.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. This paper reviews the use of botanical extracts in the control of coccidial infection in poultry. 2. Some plants and their respective volatile oils and extracts have the potential to alleviate coccidiosis and reduce its severity. 3. Most plant bioactives improve some, but not all, aspects of coccidiosis with variable effectiveness against different species of Eimeria. 4. Difficulties in comparing research findings have arisen from the use of different experimental models, different active components and infectious dose of Eimeria. 5. Current knowledge of their potential anti-coccidial effects may provide guidance for the use of botanical extracts in the control of the coccidiosis.
    British Poultry Science 12/2013; 54(6):713-27. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carotenoids are isoprenoid molecules which are synthesised de novo by photosynthetic plants, fungi and algae and are responsible for the orange, yellow and some red colours of various fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids are lipophilic compounds, some of which act as provitamins A. These compounds can be divided into xanthophylls and carotenes. Many macroalgae and microalgae are rich in carotenoids, where these compounds aid in the absorption of sunlight. Industrially, these carotenoids are used as food pigments (in dairy products, beverages, etc.), as feed additives, in cosmetics and in pharmaceuticals, especially nowadays when there is an increasing demand by consumers for natural products. Production of carotenoids from algae has many advantages compared to other sources; for example, their production is cheap, easy and environmentally friendly; their extraction is easier, with higher yields, and there is no lack of raw materials or limited seasonal variation. Recently, there has been considerable interest in dietary carotenoids with respect to their antioxidant properties and their ability to reduce the incidence of some chronic diseases where free radicals are involved. Possibly, carotenoids protect cells from oxidative stress by quenching singlet oxygen damage with various mechanisms. Therefore, carotenoids derived from algae could be a leading natural resource in the research for potential functional ingredients.
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 09/2012; · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated effects of administration of two levels of clinoptilolite via colostrum and milk to dairy calves on blood serum antibody levels against Escherichia coli, and on the incidence of diarrhea. Eighty-four clinically healthy Holstein calves were divided into three groups according to body weight (BW), sex and the parity of their dams. Group Z1 (n = 28) was fed clinoptilolite at 1 g/kg BW/d via colostrum initially, and milk afterwards. Group Z2 (n = 28) was fed clinoptilolite at 2 g/kg BW/d via colostrum and milk and Group C (n = 28) was fed colostrum and milk without clinoptilolite supplementation. The experiment started at the day of parturition and lasted for 10 d. All calves were fed with the same mixture of frozen colostrum for the first 36 h after calving and thereafter with bulk tank milk twice a day. Specific antibody levels against E. coli were determined in blood serum samples of calves at birth, 12, 24 and 48 h after calving. All calves were monitored daily for incidence of diarrhea throughout the experiment. Blood serum antibody levels were higher (P<0.05) in calves that were fed clinoptilolite compared to controls, and those of Z2 were higher (P<0.05) than Z1 throughout the experiment. Administration of clinoptilolite reduced (P<0.05) the incidence of diarrhea. Supplementation of clinoptilolite at 1 g/kg or 2 g/kg BW/d in the colostrum initially, and milk afterwards, during the first 10 d after calving can be effectively used to enhance intestinal absorption of antibodies against enterotoxigenic strains of E. coli, and to reduce the incidence and duration of diarrhea in calves.
    Animal Feed Science and Technology 03/2012; 172(s 3–4):136–140. · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the dietary supplementation of mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) extracted from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, acidifiers-calcium formate (CF), calcium propionate (CP)- and their combination on the caecal microflora of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). Four hundred and fifty 1-day old quail where divided in six groups with three replicates each. One group that served as control received the basal diet. The five experimental diets consisted of the basal diet to which either 1 g MOS/kg, or 6 g CF/kg, or 6 g CP/kg, or 1 g MOS plus 6 g CF/kg or 1 g MOS plus 6 g CP/kg were added. The body weight was examined at weekly intervals and mortality was recorded daily. At days 21 and 42 of age, the total count of aerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteriaceae and coliforms in the caecal content of one bird of each replicate was determined. Also, at day 42 of age, two birds of each replicate were slaughtered and their carcass weight was determined. The results showed that MOS significantly (P ≤ 0.050) increased the total aerobic plate and lactic acid bacteria counts on day 21. Furthermore, CP significantly (P ≤ 0.050) decreased the total aerobic plate and lactic acid bacteria counts compared to controls on day 21. Significant interaction between MOS and acidifiers was noticed on total aerobic plate count on day 21. No significant (P > 0.050) difference was found in the caecal microflora on day 42. Finally, no significant (P > 0.050) difference was noticed on mortality, body and carcass weight.
    Anaerobe 05/2011; 17(6):436-9. · 2.02 Impact Factor
  • Efterpi Christaki, Panagiota Florou-Paneri, Eleftherios Bonos
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    ABSTRACT: Microalgae are known for centuries, but their commercial large-scale production started a few decades ago. They can be grown in open-culture systems such as lakes or highly controlled close-culture systems, have higher productivity than the traditional crops and can be grown in climatic conditions and regions where other crops cannot be grown, such as desert and coastal areas. The edible microalgae are the green algae (chlorophyta) and the cyanobacteria. Microalgae contain substances of high biological value, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, proteins, amino acids, pigments, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. They are promising sources for novel products and applications and they can be used in the diet of humans and animals as natural foods with health benefits. Moreover, they can find use in the protection of the environment, as well as in pharmaceuticals, biofuel production and cosmetics.
    International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 05/2011; 62(8):794-9. · 1.26 Impact Factor
  • E. Bonos, E. Christaki, P. Florou-Paneri
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    ABSTRACT: The sunflower plant (Helianthus annuus) is an annual herbaceous plant of the Asteraceae family. It is grown primarily for its seeds, the sunflower oil and the sunflower meal obtained from it, but also as an ornamental plant, as feed and as fuel. The sunflower seed is comprised from the husk on the outside and the kernel on the inside, whereas depending on the oil content it is categorised in two varieties, one with low oil content (average 25%) and another with high oil content (40% - 51%). The sunflower oil is high in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E and plant sterols and low in saturated fatty acids. The fatty acids composition of the sunflower oil depends mainly on the variety of the sunflower seeds and thus the sunflower oil is categorised in linoleic sunflower oil or classic (with high polyunsaturated fatty acids content), oleic sunflower oil or High-oleic (with a high monounsaturated fatty acids content) and middle oleic sunflower oil or NuSun (with an intermediate oleic acid content). It is marketed as raw oil or refined oil. The sunflower oil is added to the rations of farm animals in order to increase their energy content and to meet their essential fatty acids needs. Nowadays, many researchers study its effect on the composition of milk, meat and eggs produced from farm animals, in order to obtain characteristics more desirable for the human consumers, such as higher concentration of unsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, as well as higher concentration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The sunflower meal is the main byproduct of the sunflower seeds after oil extraction. Sunflower meal may differ in color and texture, as well as in their chemical composition, depending on the variety of the sunflower, the degree of hull removal and the method of treatment. The crude fiber content varies from 12% to 32%, the crude protein from 24% to 44% and the ether extract from 1% to 10%. It also contains a significant amount of vitamins and non-starch polysaccharides. The sunflower oil and the sunflower meal can be used in the nutrition of both monogastric animals and ruminants.
    Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society 12/2010; 62(1):58-70. · 0.27 Impact Factor
  • E.V Christaki, E.M Bonos, P.C Florou-Paneri
    South African Journal Of Animal Science 12/2010; 41(2):126-133. · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    E. Christaki, M. Karatzia, P. Florou-Paneri
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    ABSTRACT: In this review article the use of algae as feed in animal nutrition is being examined. The algae evolved on earth 3.5 billion years ago. They are primitive, generally aquatic and photosynthetic organisms, which range in size from 0,2-2,0 μm in diameter -microalgae (phytoplankton) up to 60 m length-macroalgae and may divide once or more per day. Algae are classified using a combination of characteristics in the chlorophyta, phaeophyta, chrysophyta, rhodophyta (all of them are macroalgae), pyrrhophyta and cyanophyta (they are microalgae). The chemical composition of algae varies over a wide range and depends on environmental conditions. Algae are necessary in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. They can be used as biodisel from their bio-lipid oil, as feed additives (alginates, carrageenans, agar, pigments), as therapeutic agents, as cosmetics, as organic fertilizer. Moreover, edible algae are considered sources of minerals and a complementary source of food protein for human -especially in functional foods and animal nutrition, both in ruminants and monogastric animals. Algae in the rations of lactating cows increased milk production, the average milk protein, the amount of lactose, and prolonged the lactation period, while algae rich in (n-3) fatty acids effected positively on this fatty acid content of milk. In calves the dietary algae en-hanced immune function and improved carcass characteristics. Regarding the ewes, the algae nutrition affected milk fat composition and their dairy products. Researches on monogastric animals showed that the dietary supplementation of algae rich in docosqexaenoic acid increased its content in muscle tissue of rabbits, heavy pigs (live weight around 160 kg) and in the egg yolk of laying hens. In addition, algae in poultry diets can be used effectively as pigment sources both in egg yolk and in broiler skin and shanks. Algae have been found also to be a valuable food for fish farmed by acquaculture. However, further investigation is needed concerning the use of algae in human and animal nutrition.
    Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society 06/2010; 61(3):267-276. · 0.27 Impact Factor
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    Eleftherios M. Bonos, Efterpi V. Christaki, Panagiota C. Florou-Paneri
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of the dietary supplementation of Mannan Oligosaccharides (MOS) and the acidifier Calcium Propionate (CP) on the performance and carcass quality of the Japanese quail ( Coturnix japonica ) was investigated in this experimentation. Three hundred, one-day old Japanese quail divided into four groups with three subgroups each were fed a basal diet that served as control, or a basal diet containing 6 g/kg CP, or 1 g/kg MOS or 1 g/kg MOS plus 6 g/kg CP. The body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion ratio and mortality of the birds were calculated at weekly intervals. On last day of the growing period (day 42) the birds were slaughtered, the carcasses were processed and the carcass weight, carcass dressing percentage and carcass parts percentage were calculated. Furthermore, the breast meat composition and its fatty acid profile were analyzed. The results of the experimentation showed that the addition of MOS in the feed of growing quail significantly (p < 0.050) increased the body weight on second week and the feed consumption on second and fourth weeks, while it decreased the liver to live weight percentage and the palmitic acid content of the breast meat. Moreover, the addition of CP in the feed significantly (p < 0.050) decreased the feed consumption on fifth week and the heart to live weight percentage. Significant (p < 0.050) interaction between the examined supplements was observed on the feed consumption, the FCR and the liver to live weight percentage. No adverse effects from the dietary addition of MOS or CP or both were observed on the performance or the carcass quality of the growing quail.
    International Journal of Poultry Science. 01/2010;
  • E.M. Bonos, E.V. Christaki, P.C. Florou-Paneri
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of sex and the supplementation of the prebiotic, mannan oligosaccharides (MOS), the acidifier, calcium propionate (CPr) or their combination in the feed of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) on their performance and carcass quality was examined in this experimentation. Three hundred, 1-day old Japanese quail were divided into four groups with three replicates each. One group that served as control received the basal diet. The three experimental diets consisted of the basal diet to which either 6 g CPr/kg, 2 g MOS/kg or both 2 g MOS/kg and 6 g CPr/kg was added. The body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion ratio (kg feed/kg weight gain) and mortality were examined at weekly intervals. At the end of the 42-day feeding period the birds were slaughtered, the carcasses were processed and the carcass weight, carcass dressing percentage and carcass part percentages were calculated. Also, the breast meat composition and its fatty acid profile were analyzed. Results showed that the female quail had a higher body and carcass weight and liver to live weight percentage, whereas they had lower carcass dressing percentage than males. The dietary addition of MOS increased body and carcass weight, whereas it decreased liver to live weight percentage and crude fat content of the breast meat. The dietary addition of CPr lowered carcass dressing percentage and ash content of the breast meat. Interactions between the two examined supplements were observed in feed consumption, feed conversion ratio and carcass weight. An interaction between MOS and sex was observed on carcass weight. It was concluded that MOS and calcium propionate can be used effectively in Japanese quail diets.
    South African Journal Of Animal Science 12/2009; 40(3):173-184. · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-four 12-week-old female turkeys divided into four equal groups were fed a basal diet (CONT) or basal diet supplemented with 300 mg α-tocopheryl acetate/kg (TOC), or 5 g rosemary/kg (ROS5), or 10 g rosemary/kg (ROS10), for 4 weeks. Following slaughter, fillets from breast were stored at 4 °C in the dark for 12 days, and lipid oxidation was assessed on the basis of the malondialdehyde formed, whereas microbial growth on the basis of total viable counts (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Enterobacteriaceae (ENB) and psychrotrophic (PSY) bacteria. Results showed that incorporation of dried rosemary in turkey diets delayed lipid oxidation in raw breast meat during refrigerated storage. Dietary rosemary at the level of 1 g/100 g was significantly (P<0.05) more effective in delaying lipid oxidation compared to 0.5 g/100 g but inferior to the dietary supplementation of 300 mg α-tocopheryl acetate/kg. TVC, LAB, ENB and PSY bacterial counts were all significantly increased (P<0.05) in breast samples of all groups throughout the refrigerated storage. The TOC and CONT groups presented TVC, LAB, ENB and PSY counts that did not differ (P>0.05) among each other, during the whole storage period. However, the rosemary-supplemented groups presented bacterial counts that were significantly lower (P<0.05) than the CONT and TOC groups, at day 2 of storage period and thereafter. During this period, the ROS5 group presented TVC, LAB, ENB and PSY counts that were significantly higher (P<0.05) than the ROS10 group.
    LWT - Food Science and Technology. 01/2007;
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment with neomycin (as a positive control) and dried oregano leaves on mortality, number of days scouring and severity of scours due to Escherichia coli were examined in 30 Holstein calves. Calves were assigned to one of the treatments following clinical signs of diarrhoea (i.e. faecal score >2), and treated either with an oral solution of neomycin sulphate, to provide 10 mg neomycin sulphate per kg calf body weight per 24 h, or dried oregano leaves, to provide 10 mg oregano essential oil per kg calf body weight per 24 h. The number of scouring days, severity of scouring and mortality rates were similar between the treatments. This study indicates that dried oregano leaves administered as an oral solution to calves with diarrhoea may be as effective in the treatment of colibacillosis as neomycin.
    Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series A 05/2006; 53(3):154-6. · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 1. The effects of dietary inclusion of red stigmas of Greek saffron (Crocus sativus L.) on the oxidative stability of shell eggs and liquid yolks were investigated and compared with those of dietary a-tocopherol. 2. Ninety-six Lohmann laying hens, 38 weeks old, distributed into 4 groups with 4 replicates each, were given either a control diet, diets enriched with 10 (SAF10) or 20 (SAF20) mg/kg saffron, or a diet enriched with 200 mg/kg a-tocopheryl acetate (VE200). 3. Following 6 weeks of feeding, eggs were collected and the rate of lipid oxidation was determined in refrigerated stored shell eggs, as well as in yolks adjusted to a pH of 6.2 or 4.2 and stored in the presence of light. 4. The results showed that the extent of lipid oxidation in shell eggs, as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, differed between dietary treatments, but did not change with storage time. In stored shell eggs, MDA levels differed between dietary treatments at all time points. 5. Yolks from the control group adjusted to pH 6.2 gave MDA values higher than those of the SAF10 group, which in turn were higher than those of the SAF20 group, a finding suggesting that saffron exerted a dose-dependent antioxidative activity. The VE200 group gave lower MDA values than the other groups at all time points. The oxidation profile of yolks at pH 4.2 showed a similar pattern but the rate of oxidation was greater.
    British Poultry Science 01/2006; 46(6):701-7. · 1.15 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Poultry Science - J POULT SCI. 01/2006; 43(2):143-149.
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    ABSTRACT: 1. A study was conducted with 120 female early maturing turkeys to test the effect of dietary dried oregano leaves (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum) on body weight (BW), feed intake (FI), feed conversion efficiency (FCE), carcase characteristics and serum cholesterol concentration. Dried oregano leaves had a content of 3.6 ml essential oils/100 g, while the carvacrol content was 855 g/kg of the total essential oils. 2. From 1 to 84 d of age, the turkeys were fed on 4 diets varying in oregano content (OR0, no oregano--control; OR45, 1.25 g oregano/kg; OR90, 2.5 g oregano/kg; OR135, 3.75 g oregano/kg). Birds were given feed and water ad libitum. 3. BW was unaffected by oregano throughout the experiment. FI and FCE were similar among all treatments until 42 d of age. From 43 to 84 d of age and for the overall experimental period, FI decreased linearly in treatment OR135 and FCE increased linearly with dietary oregano content. Body and carcase weights, carcase yield, and the relative weights of the heart and liver were not significantly affected by oregano content. The relative weights of the gizzard and small intestine decreased linearly with oregano content. Serum cholesterol content was similar among all treatments. 4. In the present study, dietary oregano (1.25, 2.5 and 3.75 g/kg) improved FCE in female early maturing turkeys between 43 and 84 d, with the lowest oregano inclusion (1.25 g/kg) giving the most cost effective diet. Thus, dried oregano leaves may be used as a natural herbal growth promoter for early maturing turkeys.
    British Poultry Science 11/2005; 46(5):595-601. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate the use of oregano herb versus oregano essential oil as feed supplements to increase the oxidative stability of turkey meat stored at 4<sup>o</sup>C. Thirty 12-week-old turkeys allocated into five groups were fed a control diet and diets supplemented with 5 g oregano herb/kg, 10 g oregano herb/kg, 100 mg oregano essential oil/kg, and 200 mg oregano essential oil/kg, for 4 weeks prior to slaughter. Lipid oxidation was assessed by monitoring malondialdehyde formation in breast and thigh meat at 0, 3, 6 and 9 days of refrigerated storage. Results showed that the feed supplements increased the oxidative stability of meat without exerting any effect on feed intake and daily weight gain of turkeys. Oregano essential oil supplementation at 100 mg/kg was more effective in delaying lipid oxidation compared to the control diet at all time points, but inferior to the oregano herb at 5 g/kg. Also, oregano essential oil at 200 mg/kg was more effective than the oregano herb at 5 g/kg and equivalent to oregano herb at 10 g/kg, in delaying lipid oxidation. Thigh meat was more susceptible to lipid oxidation compared to breast meat.
    International Journal of Poultry Science. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty four 12-week-old turkeys were divided into four equal groups. One of the groups was given a basal diet containing 30 mg α-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed (CONT), whereas the other groups the basal diet further supplemented with 100 mg α-tocopheryl acetate/kg (TOC), or 100 mg oregano essential oil/kg (OR), or 100 mg oregano essential oil plus 100 mg α-tocopheryl acetate/kg (ORTOC), for 4 weeks prior to slaughter. Lipid oxidation, total viable counts (TVC) and Pseudomonas spp. counts were all assessed in breast fillets stored refrigerated at 4<SUP>o</SUP>C for 12 days. Results showed that the OR group was more effective (P< 0.05) in delaying lipid oxidation compared to the CONT group, but inferior (P< 0.05) to TOC group which in turn was inferior (P< 0.05) to the ORTOC group. TVC and Pseudomonas spp. counts of the TOC group were not different (P< 0.05) than those of the CONT group, but higher (P< 0.05) than those of the OR and ORTOC groups, which in their turn did not differ (P>0.05) among each other.
    International Journal of Poultry Science. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the effect of feeding oregano essential oil and α-tocopheryl acetate on hen performance and egg quality, were investigated. Ninety-six Lohmann laying hens, 32-week-old, were allocated into four groups. One of the groups was given a control diet (CONT), another group a diet supplemented with 200 mg/kg α-tocopheryl acetate (VIT-E), whereas the other two groups were given diets supplemented with oregano essential oil at levels of 50 and 100 mg/kg (OR-50 and OR-100, respectively). Following 60 days feeding, hen performance and some egg quality characteristics were determined, whereas the oxidative stability of the refrigerated stored shell eggs and liquid yolks was also examined. Results showed that there were no significant (P>0.05) differences in egg production, feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, egg weight and shape, yolk diameter, height and color, Haugh units, and shell thickness, among the dietary treatments. The extent of lipid oxidation in shell eggs differed (P< 0.05) between the dietary treatments, but did not change with the storage time. In liquid yolks, lipid oxidation was higher (P< 0.05) in the CONT group compared to the OR-50 group, which in turn exhibited higher (P< 0.05) oxidation rate than the OR-100 group, a finding suggesting that oregano exerted a dose dependent antioxidative activity. The VIT-E group presented lower (P< 0.05) lipid oxidation rate compared to all other groups.
    International Journal of Poultry Science. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: In an experiment with 45 male growing Chios lambs, the effect of dietary dried oregano (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum) leaves supplementation on performance and carcass characteristics was determined. In the 10 wk experiment, lambs were allocated to 1 of 3 treatments (OR0, OR144, and OR288) of 15 lambs each. Lambs had an initial body weight (BW) of 17.5±1.8kg, and were fed a concentrate mixture ad libitum and alfalfa hay at 0.4kg/(lambd). The concentrate mixture for treatment OR0 was not supplemented with dried oregano leaves (control), while dried oregano leaves were incorporated into the concentrate mixture of treatments OR144 and OR288 at levels of 4 and 8kg/t, respectively, to provide oregano essential oil at levels of 144 and 288mg/kg of concentrate, respectively. No differences were observed among dried oregano leaves inclusion treatments in final BW (36.7kg), BW gain (BWG, 275g/d), dry matter intake (DMI, 1.09kg/d), and feed conversion ratio (3.98kg DMI/kg BWG). All carcass yield traits as kg/100kg of BW were unaffected by treatment. Dried oregano leaves supplementation in isonitrogenous and iso (net energy) energetic diets for growing lambs did not affect their performance and carcass characteristics.
    Animal Feed Science and Technology - ANIM FEED SCI TECH. 01/2005; 121(3):285-295.
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    ABSTRACT: In an experiment with 80 growing Florina (Pelagonia) lambs, effects of dietary garlic (Allium sativum) bulb and garlic husk supplementation on performance and carcass characteristics were determined. In the experiment, which lasted 10 weeks, lambs were allocated to 5 treatments (GBGH0, GB30, GB60, GH50, and GH100) of 16 lambs (8 male and 8 female each). Male and female lambs had an initial body weight (BW) of 13.9±2.1 and 12.8±1.7kg, respectively, and were fed a concentrate mixture ad libitum and alfalfa hay at 0.2kg/lamb/d. The concentrate mixture for treatment GBGH0 had no garlic bulbs or husks (control), while those for treatments GB30 and GB60 included 30 and 60kg/t of garlic bulbs, respectively, and those for treatments GH50 and GH100 included 50 and 100kg/t of garlic husks, respectively. Male lambs grew faster than female lambs, but there were no differences among garlic bulb or garlic husk fed lambs in final BW, BW gain, dry matter intake or feed conversion ratio. Males had heavier carcasses than females, but there were no differences in carcass yield, or other carcass characteristics, between sexes. Garlic bulb and garlic husk supplementation in isonitrogenous and iso (net energy) energetic diets for growing lambs did not affect their performances.
    Animal Feed Science and Technology - ANIM FEED SCI TECH. 01/2005; 121(3):273-283.