Pieter N. Windmeijer

Wageningen University, Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands

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Publications (2)5.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Inland valleys with wet lowlands are an important water source for farming communities in the sub-humid zone of West Africa. An inland valley and surrounding contributing watershed area located in the sub-humid zone near M'bé in central Côte d'Ivoire was instrumented to study surface runoff and base flow mechanisms. Four flumes at different distances down the main stream and more than 100 piezometers were installed. Measurements were taken during two rainfall seasons in 1998 and 1999. Under initial wet conditions, a typical single-peak hydrograph was observed. Under low antecedent moisture conditions, however, runoff was characterized by a double-peaked hydrograph. The first peak, which occurred during the storm, was caused by rain falling on the saturated valley bottom. The second peak was delayed by minutes to hours from the first peak and consisted of rain flowing via the subsurface of the hydromorphic zone that surrounds the valley bottom. The duration of the delay was a function of the water table depth in the hydromorphic zone before the storm. The volume of the second peak constituted the largest portion of the stream flow. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Hydrological Processes 04/2003; 17(6):1213 - 1225. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to produce a malaria distribution map that would constitute a useful tool for development and health planners in West Africa. The recently created continental database of malaria survey results (MARA/ARMA 1998) provides the opportunity for producing empirical models and maps of malaria distribution at a regional and eventually at a continental level. This paper reports on the mapping of malaria distribution for sub-Saharan West Africa based on these data. The strategy was to undertake a spatial statistical analysis of malaria parasite prevalence in relation to those potential bio-physical environmental factors involved in the distribution of malaria transmission intensity which are readily available at any map location. The resulting model was then used to predict parasite prevalence for the whole of West Africa. We also produced estimates of the proportion of population of each country in the region exposed to various categories of risk to show the impact that malaria is having on individual countries. The data represent a very large sample of children in West Africa. It constitutes a first attempt to produce a malaria risk map of the West African region, based entirely on malariometric data. We anticipate that it will provide useful additional guidance to control programme managers, and that it can be refined once sufficient additional data become available.
    Tropical Medicine & International Health 11/2001; 6(10):779-86. · 2.94 Impact Factor