Are you P Chequer?

Claim your profile

Publications (5)13.4 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to assess the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance mutation profiles and evaluate the distribution of the genetic subtypes in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, blood samples from 547 HIV-1 infected patients failing antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, were collected during the years 2002 and 2003 to perform the viral resistance genotyping at the Renageno Laboratory from Rio de Janeiro (Oswaldo Cruz Foundation). Viral resistance genotyping was performed using ViroSeq Genotyping System (Celera Diagnostic-Abbott, US). The HIV-1 subtyping based on polymerase (pol) gene sequences (protease and reverse transcriptase-RT regions) was as follows: subtype B (91.2%), subtype F (4.9%), and B/F viral recombinant forms (3.3%). The subtype C was identified in two patients (0.4%) and the recombinant CRF_02/AG virus was found infecting one patient (0.2%). The HIV-1 genotyping profile associated to the reverse transcriptase inhibitors has shown a high frequency of the M184V mutation followed by the timidine-associated mutations. The K103N mutation was the most prevalent to the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor and the resistance associated to protease inhibitor showed the minor mutations L63P, L10F/R, and A71V as the more prevalent. A large proportion of subtype B was observed in HIV-1 treated patients from Rio de Janeiro. In addition, we have identified the circulation of drug-resistant HIV-1 subtype C and are presenting the first report of the occurrence of an African recombinant CRF_02/AG virus in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A clear association between HIV-1 subtypes and protease resistance mutations was observed in this study. The maintenance of resistance genotyping programs for HIV-1 failing patients is important to the management of ARV therapies and to attempt and monitor the HIV-1 subtype prevalence in Brazil.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 03/2005; 100(1):73-8. · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Brazilian Network for HIV Isolation and Characterization was established for the surveillance of HIV variability in Brazil. Here, we report characterization of HIV strains and virus-specific immune responses from 35 clinical samples collected from three potential HIV vaccine sites. Three genetic subtypes of HIV-1 were identified by heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) B (in 82.9% of the samples), F (14.3%), and C (2.9%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the C2V3/env DNA sequence from all 25 specimens examined was 100% concordant with HMA results. Four variants of subtype B with different tetrapeptides at the tip of the V3 loop were found: the GPGR motif (North American), GWGR motif (Brazilian B"), and two minor variants, GFGR and GPGS, as previously detected. No significant association was found between HIV-1 subtypes and the mode of transmission or biologic properties of HIV-1 isolates (derived from 88.6% of the specimens). Only 5 of 16 isolates studied were neutralized by the autologous sera. Consistent with previous results, no relation between viral subtype and peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) seroreactivity or neutralization was evident. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of the collaborative approach followed by Brazilian scientists when addressing a complex subject such as HIV variability.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 03/2000; 23(2):184-93. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Brazilian Network for HIV Isolation and Characterization was established for the surveillance of HIV variability in Brazil. Here, we report characterization of HIV strains and virus-specific immune responses from 35 clinical samples collected from three potential HIV vaccine sites. Three genetic subtypes of HIV-1 were identified by heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) B (in 82.9% of the samples), F (14.3%), and C (2.9%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the C2V3/env DNA sequence from all 25 specimens examined was 100% concordant with HMA results. Four variants of subtype B with different tetrapeptides at the tip of the V3 loop were found: the GPGR motif (North American), GWGR motif (Brazilian B"), and two minor variants, GFGR and GPGS, as previously detected. No significant association was found between HIV-1 subtypes and the mode of transmission or biologic properties of HIV-1 isolates (derived from 88.6% of the specimens). Only 5 of 16 isolates studied were neutralized by the autologous sera. Consistent with previous results, no relation between viral subtype and peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) seroreactivity or neutralization was evident. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of the collaborative approach followed by Brazilian scientists when addressing a complex subject such as HIV variability. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 01/2000; 23(2). · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Efforts to characterize HIV-1 polymorphism and anti-HIV immune response are being made in areas where anti-HIV/AIDS vaccines are to be employed. Anti-HIV-1 humoral immune response is being studied in infected individuals residents in Rio de Janeiro, in distinct cohorts involving recent seroconvertors, pregnant women or intravenous drug users (IDU). Comparative analyses of specificity of antibody response towards epitopes important for anti-HIV-1 immune response indicate quantitative differences between cohorts, with an exceptionally strong response in IDUs and weakest response in pregnant women. However, a comparative analysis between pregnant women cohorts from Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul indicated an even lower response (with exception of the anti-V3-C clade peptide recognition) for the southern cohort. Studies analysing the immune function of the humoral response indicate a quite elevated occurrence of antibodies capable for neutralizing heterologous primary HIV-1 isolates from Rio de Janeiro. Attempts to correlate seroreactivity with HIV-1 neutralization with respect to HIV-1 polymorphism were not very successful: while the Brazilian B clade B " variant could be recognized by binding assays, no significant distinction of HIV-1 clades/variants was observed in viral neutralization assays.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 01/1998; 93(3):391-8. · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Efforts to characterize HIV-1 polymorphism and anti-HIV immune response are being made in areas where anti-HIV/AIDS vaccines are to be employed. Anti-HIV-1 humoral immune response is being studied in infected individuals resident in Rio de Janeiro, in distinct cohorts involving recent seroconvertors, pregnant women or intravenous drug users (IDU). Comparative analyses of specificity of antibody response towards epitopes important for anti-HIV-1 immune response indicate quantitative differences between cohorts, with an exceptionally strong response in IDUs and weakest response in pregnant women. However, a comparative analysis between pregnant women cohorts from Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul indicated an even lower response (with exception of the anti-V3-C clade peptide recognition) for the southern cohort. Studies analysing the immune function of the humoral response indicate a quite elevated occurrence of antibodies capable of neutralizing heterologous primary HIV-1 isolates from Rio de Janeiro. Attempts to correlate seroreactivity with HIV-1 neutralization with respect to HIV-1 polymorphism were not very successfull: while the Brazilian B clade B" variant could be recognized by binding assays, no significant distinction of HIV-1 clades/variants was observed in viral neutralization assays.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 01/1998; · 1.36 Impact Factor