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Publications (3)7.19 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mounting evidence suggest that epigenetic regulation of brain functions is important in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. These epigenetic regulatory mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation, are influenced by many pharmaceutical compounds including psychiatric drugs. It is therefore of interest to investigate how psychiatric drugs are of influence and what the potential is of new epigenetic drugs for psychiatric disorders. With this targeted review we summarize the current state of knowledge in order to provide insight in this developing field. Several traditional psychiatric drugs have been found to alter the epigenome and in a variety of animal studies, experimental compounds with epigenetic targets have been investigated as potential psychiatric drugs. After discussion of the most relevant epigenetic mechanisms we present the evidence for epigenetic effects for the most relevant classes of drugs.
    Epigenetics: official journal of the DNA Methylation Society 01/2012; 7(1):20-8. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is the transient rise in body temperature after encountering a stressor. The SIH response can be blocked by administration of various anxiolytic drugs prior to inducing stress. However, a drug injection involves handling and injection stress and therefore induces a SIH response itself. In the standard SIH test, drugs are therefore injected 60 min before stress induction to allow injection-induced hyperthermia to decline. This makes it difficult to study putative anxiolytic compounds with a short half-life. The present study therefore aimed to compare the effects of standard (stressful) and stress-free anxiolytic drug administration on the subsequent SIH response with a 10-minute injection-stressor interval. Anxiolytic drugs with short half-lives (midazolam, 8-OH-DPAT, nicotine) were injected subcutaneously in rats using either a stressful (manual injection) or stress-free injection (subcutaneous cannula) method 10 min before novel cage stress. Body temperature and locomotor activity were measured using telemetric transmitters. Stressful and stress-free drug administration resulted in comparable drug effects on the stress-induced hyperthermia and locomotor responses in rats. The present study shows that both stressful and stress-free drug injection shortly before a stressor results in reproducible attenuation of the SIH response in rats. In rats, a short injection-stressor interval can therefore be applied using the SIH model, enabling the study of putative anxiolytic drugs with short half-lives.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 07/2009; 93(4):413-8. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is the transient rise in body temperature after encountering a stressor. The SIH response can be blocked by administration of various anxiolytic drugs prior to inducing stress. However, a drug injection involves handling and injection stress and therefore induces a SIH response itself. In the standard SIH test, drugs are therefore injected 60 min before stress induction to allow injection-induced hyperthermia to decline. This makes it difficult to study putative anxiolytic compounds with a short half-life. The present study therefore aimed to compare the effects of standard (stressful) and stress-free anxiolytic drug administration on the subsequent SIH response with a 10-minute injection-stressor interval.
    01/2009;