Nuha M K Yousif

Max Rubner-Institut, Carlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

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Publications (7)20.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The diversity of lactic acid bacteria associated with Hussuwa fermentation, a Sudanese fermented sorghum food, was studied using a polyphasic taxonomical approach. Predominant strains could be well characterised based on a combination of phenotypic tests and genotypic methods such as ARDRA, rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR, as well as 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representative strains. Thus, the majority (128 of 220, 58.3%) of strains exhibited phenotypic properties typical of heterofermentative lactobacilli and of these, 100 strains were characterised more closely using the genotyping methods. The majority (97/100) strains could be characterised as Lactobacillus fermentum strains. Seventy-two of 220 strains (32.7%) showed phenotypic properties that are characteristic of pediococci. Of 41 selected strains investigated by genotyping techniques, 38 (92.7%) could be characterised as Pediococcus acidilactici strains, while three (7.3%) could be characterised as Pediococcus pentosaceus strains. The Hussuwa fermentation thus appears to be dominated by L. fermentum strains and P. acidilactici strains. For this reason, we selected representative and predominant strains as potential starter cultures for Hussuwa fermentation. These strains, L. fermentum strains BFE 2442 and BFE 2282 and P. acidilactici strain BFE 2300, were shown on the basis of RAPD-PCR fingerprinting to predominate in a model fermentation when used as starter cultures inoculated at 1 x 10(6) CFU/g and to lower the pH of the fermentation to below pH 4.0 within 48 h. These cultures should be studied for further development as starter preparations in pilot scale studies in actual field fermentations.
    Food Microbiology 09/2010; 27(6):757-68. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify enterococci from Hussuwa, a Sudanese fermented sorghum product, and determine their technological properties and safety for possible inclusion in a starter culture preparation. Twenty-two Enterococcus isolates from Hussuwa were identified as Enterococcus faecium by using phenotypic and genotypic tests such as 16S rDNA gene sequencing, RAPD-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S/23S intergenic spacer region fingerprinting. Genotyping revealed that strains were not clonally related and exhibited a considerable degree of genomic diversity. Some strains possessed useful technological properties such as production of bacteriocins and H2O2 or utilization of raffinose and stachyose. None produced alpha-amylase or tannase. A safety investigation revealed that all strains were susceptible to the antibiotics ampicillin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and streptomycin, but some were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, penicillin and vancomycin. Production of biogenic amines or presence of genes encoding virulence determinants occurred in some strains. Enterococcus faecium strains are associated with fermentation of Sudanese Hussuwa. Some strains exhibited useful technological properties such as production of antimicrobial agents and fermentation of indigestible sugars, which may aid in stabilizing and improving the digestibility of the product respectively. Enterococci were shown to play a role in the fermentation of African foods. While beneficial properties of these bacteria are indicated, their presence in this food may also imply a hygienic risk as a result of antimicrobial resistances or presence of virulence determinants.
    Journal of Applied Microbiology 02/2005; 98(1):216-28. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Enterococcus faecium strain FAIR-E 345 isolated from food was shown to possess bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) activity in a plate screening assay and by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The bsh gene was cloned and sequenced. DNA sequence analysis revealed that it encoded a protein of 324 amino acids, with pI 4.877. A bsh gene probe was prepared from the cloned bsh gene and was used for probing plasmid and total genomic DNA of Bsh-positive enterococci isolated from food to determine the genomic location of their bsh genes. This probe was able to detect the bsh gene among total genomic DNA preparations but not from plasmid preparations of 10 plasmid-bearing Enterococcus strains. However, the probe could detect the bsh gene from total genomic DNA preparations of 12 Enterococcus strains that did not contain detectable plasmid DNA. In no cases did the probe hybridize with plasmid DNA preparations, suggesting that the bsh gene among enterococci is probably generally chromosomally encoded. This presumptive chromosomal location of bsh genes among food enterococci suggests that transfer of this trait by conjugative plasmids is unlikely.
    Journal of food protection 01/2005; 67(12):2772-8. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence and diversity of enterococci in retail food samples of meat, dairy and vegetable origin was investigated. Enterococci were present, at concentrations of 10(1) to 10(4) CFU/g. Fifty selected isolates from food samples grouped in two separate clusters by RAPD analysis. Cluster G1 (72% of the isolates) contained the E. faecium CECT 410T type strain, and also showed a high degree of genetic diversity. Cluster G2 (28% of the isolates) contained the E. faecalis CECT 481T type strain and was genetically more homogeneous. Virulence traits (haemolysin, gelatinase or DNAse activities, or the presence of structural genes cylL, ace, asal and esp) were not detected. All isolates were sensitive to the antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. A high pecentage of isolates were resistant to erythromycin and rifampicin. Many isolates showed intermediate sensitivity to several antibiotics (tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, or quinupristin/dalfopristin). Vancomycin and teicoplanin resistance was detected in one strain, but vanA, vanB, vanC1, vanC2 or vanC3 genes were not detected. Many of the isolates showed functional properties of food or health relevance. Production of antimicrobial substances was detected in 17 of the isolates, and 14 of them carried structural genes for enterocins A, B and/or P.
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology 03/2004; 27(1):118-30. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lactobacillus plantarum CNRZ 1228 exhibited heme-dependent catalase activity under environmental conditions similar to those encountered during sausage fermentation. The 1,455-bp catalase gene (katL) was cloned and encoded a protein of 484 amino acids. Expression of katL in a heterologous host showed that katL encodes a functional catalase. PCR screening of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria for katL indicated the presence of similar genes in other strains of lactobacilli.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 02/2004; 70(1):603-6. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The increasing interest in probiotic lactobacilli implicates the requirement of techniques that allow a rapid and reliable identification of these organisms. In this study, group-specific PCR and RAPD-PCR analyses were used to identify strains of the Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus groups most commonly used in probiotic yogurts. Group-specific PCR with primers for the L. casei and L. acidophilus groups, as well as L. gasseri/johnsonii, could differentiate between 20 Lactobacillus strains isolated from probiotic yogurts and assign these into the corresponding groups. For identification of these strains to species or strain level, RAPD profiles of the 20 Lactobacillus strains were compared with 11 reference strains of the L. acidophilus and L. casei group. All except one strain could be attributed unambigously to the species L. acidophilus, L. johnsonii, L. crispatus, L. casei, and L. paracasei. DNA reassociation analysis confirmed the classification resulting from the RAPD-PCR.
    Current Microbiology 01/2004; 47(6):453-6. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of virulence factors among 48 Enterococcus faecium and 47 Enterococcus faecalis strains from foods and their antibiotic susceptibility were investigated. No strain was resistant to all antibiotics, and for some strains, multiple resistances were observed. Of E. faecium strains, 10.4% were positive for one or more virulence determinants, compared to 78.7% of E. faecalis strains. Strains exhibiting virulence traits were not necessarily positive for all traits; thus, the incidence of virulence factors may be considered to be strain specific.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 10/2001; 67(9):4385-9. · 3.95 Impact Factor