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Publications (7)18.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Two types of chemotherapy used in the treatment of patients with malignant glioma are carboplatin and Gliadel wafer [(3.85% 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)]. To date there have been no published data examining their concurrent use in this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate combination chemotherapy with Gliadel wafer and carboplatin in patients with high-grade, malignant glioma. In this prospective phase I study, 16 patients underwent surgery, Gliadel wafer implantation (up to 8 wafers), intravenous carboplatin given postoperatively (day 3 or 4) at a dose escalation range of area under the curve (AUC)=2-6, and external beam radiation. Median age was 55 years (range 27-66 years). Fourteen (88%) patients had glioblastoma multiforme and 2 (12%) had anaplastic astrocytoma. Performance status was as follows: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG)=0 (2 patients), ECOG=1 (13 patients), and ECOG=2 (2 patients). Three patients were treated at each dosing level (AUC=2-6), and 4 patients were treated at an AUC=5. Carboplatin was administered to all patients by postoperative day 4. Radiation was begun on day 14-36. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted in this study. Median progression-free and overall survival was 266 and 679 days, respectively. We conclude that administering systemic carboplatin is safe and well tolerated in the postoperative period immediately following resection and implantation of Gliadel wafer for the treatment of malignant glioma. Further evaluation in a phase II setting, at maximal carboplatin dose to establish potential efficacy, with this combination is warranted.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 06/2005; 72(3):241-4. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cranial computed tomography (CT) has assumed a critical role in the practice of emergency medicine for the evaluation of intracranial emergencies. Several recent studies have documented a deficiency in the emergency physician's ability to interpret these studies. The purpose of this study was to quantify the baseline ability of emergency medicine residents to interpret cranial CTs, and to test a novel method of cranial CT interpretation designed for the emergency physician in training. A standardized pretest was administered to assess baseline ability to interpret CT scans. A standardized posttest was given 3 months after the course. Each test consisted of 12 CT scans with a short accompanying history. All scans were validated by 3 expert reviewers for difficulty and diagnosis. A 2-hour course based on the mnemonic "Blood Can Be Very Bad" was then administered. "Blood" reminds the examiner to search for blood, "Can" prompts the examiner to identify 4 key cisterns, "Be" denotes the need to examine the brain, "Very" prompts a review of the 4 ventricles, and finally "Bad" reminds the examiner to evaluate the bones of the cranium. Eighty-three residents at 5 institutions were initially examined. The mean percentage correct before the course was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI] 58%-64%) on the standardized pretest. At retesting 3 months after the course, the accuracy rate increased to 78% (n=61, 95% CI 75%-81%, P<.001 paired t test). Emergency medicine residents are deficient in their ability to interpret cranial CT scans. A novel educational course was demonstrated to significantly improve this ability.
    Annals of Emergency Medicine 12/1998; 32(5):554-62. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 20-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of intermittent focal headaches and a generalized seizure. Computerized tomography demonstrated a hypodense ring-enhancing cystic right parietal lobe lesion. At operation, a chocolate-colored cyst was excised which on histological examination proved to be endometriosis.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/1987; 66(4):609-10. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A patient presented with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage after a prolonged episode of coughing. A preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scan confirmed subarachnoid hemorrhage, but demonstrated no other lesion. Arteriography revealed an ophthalmic artery aneurysm. Operation revealed the aneurysm to be intracavernous without sign of prior rupture; however, a small hemorrhagic meningioma was removed from the ipsilateral anterior clinoid process. In this case, coincidental meningioma and aneurysm presented as a subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to tumor hemorrhage. The follow-up of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage with negative arteriography with sequential CT scans is discussed.
    Neurosurgery 02/1987; 20(1):24-6. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An initially healthy infant born of an uncomplicated full-term gestation was brought for evaluation of the acute onset of vomiting, irritability, lethargy, and opisthotonus at 14 days of age. Computerized tomography demonstrated an intraventricular hemorrhage. Arteriography defined an angioma on the roof of the third ventricle which was successfully removed via the transcallosal interfornicial approach on the 34th day of life. Other than an easily controlled seizure disorder, the postoperative course was uneventful. At 8 months of age the child is developing normally. Arteriovenous malformations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage in full-term neonates without predisposing trauma or bleeding diathesis. High-speed digital subtraction arteriography may be used to screen for this diagnosis. The transcallosal interfornicial exposure offers a satisfactory approach for excising third ventricular angiomas in young infants.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 11/1985; 63(4):640-3. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a 2-year-old girl with signs and symptoms of a posterior fossa tumor, the computed tomographic scan showed what appeared to be a brain stem glioma. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the lesion to be extrinsic to the brain stem. Posterior fossa exploration disclosed a medulloblastoma filling the 4th ventricle. This discrepancy in imaging techniques points out the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation and treatment of posterior fossa lesions.
    Neurosurgery 10/1985; 17(3):487-9. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports two cases using a procedure which revealed a basal temporal language area (BTLA) in fusiform gyrus of language dominant hemisphere (L) by employing electrical stimu- lation and recording of the cortex, with grid electrodes, during computerized speech and object naming tasks. The procedure reduced the time necessary to map the inferior temporal, fusiform, and parahippocampal gyri by identifying the existence of and margins for BTLA during a sin- gle craniotomy for planned resection of the anterior temporal lobe in patients with medically intractable complex partial epileptic seizures. Both patients underwent intraoperative mapping for language while awake using low current, biphasic, bipolar electrical stimulation of adjacent pairs of subdural electrodes. During stimulation in the region of the fusiform gyrus, language deficits including speech arrest, dysnomia, and jargon aphasia were elicited. No interictal hot spots were observed within this region. Temporal lobe resection was immediately carried out using knowledge of the location of these language areas to guide resection. Prior reports of temporal lobe (including BTLA) mapping used chronically implanted electrodes (10-14 days), while our procedure considerably reduced mapping time, reduced from two to one the number of invasive surgical procedures and attempted to preserve this language area.