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Publications (5)3.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We have installed in Saclay a demonstration setup for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 6 MeV electron linac to produce positrons via pair production on a tungsten target. A relatively high current of 0.15 mA compensates the low energy, which is below the neutron activation threshold. The expected production rate is 4x1011 fast positrons per second. A set of coils is arranged to select the fast positrons from the diffracted electron beam in order to study the possibility to use a rare gas cryogenic moderator away from the main flux of particles. A first part of the commissioning of the linac has been performed. First attempts at measuring the fast positron flux are underway. This setup is part of a project to demonstrate the feasibility of an experiment to produce the H+ ion for a free fall measurement of neutral antihydrogen (H). Its small size and cost could be of interest for a university laboratory or industry for materials science applications. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)
    physica status solidi (c) 10/2009; 6(11):2462 - 2464. DOI:10.1002/pssc.200982123
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    ABSTRACT: We are building the SOPHI experiment in Saclay, which is a device based on a small 5 MeV electron linac [1] to produce positrons via pair production on a tungsten target. This device should provide 108 slow e+/s, i.e. a factor 300 greater than the strongest activity Na22 based setup. The SOPHI system has been finalized at the end of 2006 and the main components have been studied and built during 2007 [2]. The experiment is currently being assembled and first results are expected for autumn 2008. The electron linac, positron beam production and transport system will be presented, and expected positron production rate reported.
    03/2009; 1099(1). DOI:10.1063/1.3120198
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    ABSTRACT: A 6 MeV industrial electron linac with 0.2 mA average current will be installed in December 2007 in CEA–Saclay. Equipped with a tungsten target and moderator, it is aimed at producing rates of order 108 s−1 slow positrons. This setup is part of a project to demonstrate the feasibility of an experiment to produce the ion for a free fall measurement of . The energy is below the neutron activation threshold. Its small size and cost could be of interest for a university laboratory or industry, and could be envisaged as a replacement source for the antihydrogen experiments at CERN.
    Applied Surface Science 10/2008; DOI:10.1016/j.apsusc.2008.05.303 · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We propose to use the charge exchange reaction of antiprotons with positronium atoms in order to produce antihydrogen atoms, H, and H+ ions. The ions can be cooled down to muK temperatures and then ionized to recover an ultra slow neutral H atom. Its acceleration is then measured by time of flight. Results on the conversion of slow positrons into positronium are presented. This is a first step towards the creation of a dense cloud of positronium atoms to be used as a target for the antiprotons. The source of positrons is based on a 6 MeV industrial electron linac with 0.2 mA average current to be installed in CEA-Saclay. Equipped with a tungsten target and a moderator, it is aimed at producing rates of order 108 s-1 slow positrons.
    AIP Conference Proceedings, (Cold Antimatter Plasmas and Application to Fundamental Physics)AIP Conference Proceedings, (Cold Antimatter Plasmas and Application to Fundamental Physics); 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: The last two years have seen the completion of the integration and the cryostating of 8 superconducting coil windings for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid air-core magnet (BT). The Barrel Toroid is a 20 m in diameter, 25 m long and 5 m wide superconducting magnet for ATLAS, one of the two experiments dedicated to the search of the Higgs boson, which will be installed on the LHC ring at CERN in 2006. The paper presents the last steps of this integration progress which ends with the cold acceptance tests. A special emphasis is put on the integration of the cold mass into the vacuum vessel. The integration of the windings in their coil casings has been completed in October 2003 and the last coil cryostating was performed in June 2005. The BT coils are now being installed in the ATLAS cavern at CERN
    IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 07/2006; DOI:10.1109/TASC.2006.871349 · 1.32 Impact Factor