Are you M Bénichou-Flurin?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)3.9 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A cohort was formed to explore the evolution of COPD patients treated in general hospitals for acute exacerbations (AE). The present article describes and compares patient characteristics according to whether COPD was diagnosed before the AE or not. Data were analyzed for 1,824 patients admitted between October 2006 and June 2007 to 68 departments of respiratory medicine. Population characteristics were: male, 77%; mean age, 70.3+/-11.3 years; current smokers, 33%; baseline grade 3-4 dyspnoea, 47%; FEV1<or=50% predicted, 63%. The 290 patients (15.9%) with AE preceding the diagnosis of COPD tended to be younger, female, smokers and had less severe baseline dyspnoea and airflow obstruction. Even so, 21% had grade 3-4 dyspnoea and 44% had FEV1<or=50% predicted. At the onset of the AE, they exhibited as many signs of severity and they required intensive care and assisted ventilation as often as the patients in whom the AE followed a diagnosis of COPD. When an AE precedes the diagnosis of COPD, the morbidity of the COPD and the AE is far from negligible, justifying efforts to achieve an earlier diagnosis of COPD.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 01/2010; 27(1):19-29. DOI:10.1016/j.rmr.2009.11.007 · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer continues to have a poor prognosis despite some therapeutic advances. BACKGROUND: The last fifteen years has seen a dramatic increase in the incidence of lung cancer in women and an increased proportion of adenocarcinomas in both sexes. A study of overall survival as a function of gender and other prognostic factors has been established using the cohort of patients from the study KBP-2000-CPHG. METHODS: KBP-2000-CPHG is an epidemiological study carried out throughout the year 2000 looking at histologically confirmed primary lung cancers managed in general hospitals. 5,667 patients have been included. The study of survival looks at 2 and 5-year outcomes. The date and cause of death are recorded for each patient. In the absence of these data the date of the last contact is noted. If this is less than 4 months the patient is considered to be alive. If more than four months have elapsed a graduated strategy for establishing vital status is pursued which involves reviewing records from various different sources. RESULTS AWAITED: A preliminary review of the data was undertaken between September 2004 and March 2005 which obtained data on 5 567 patients. The analysis of survival according to sex and other forecast prognostic factors is underway.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 05/2006; 23(2 Pt 1):165-71. · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction Lung cancer continues to have a poor prognosis despite some therapeutic advances. Background The last fifteen years has seen a dramatic increase in the incidence of lung cancer in women and an increased proportion of adenocarcinomas in both sexes. A study of overall survival as a function of gender and other prognostic factors has been established using the cohort of patients from the study KBP-2000-CPHG. Methods KBP-2000-CPHG is an epidemiological study carried out throughout the year 2000 looking at histologically confirmed primary lung cancers managed in general hospitals. 5 667 patients have been included. The study of survival looks at 2 and 5-year outcomes. The date and cause of death are recorded for each patient. In the absence of these data the date of the last contact is noted. If this is less than 4 months the patient is considered to be alive. If more than four months have elapsed a graduated strategy for establishing vital status is pursued which involves reviewing records from various different sources. Results awaited A preliminary review of the data was undertaken between September 2004 and March 2005 which obtained data on 5 567 patients. The analysis of survival according to sex and other forecast prognostic factors is underway.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 04/2006; 23(2):165-171. DOI:10.1016/S0761-8425(06)71482-6 · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 01/2006; 23:112-112. DOI:10.1016/S0761-8425(06)72420-2 · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There are few data on primary bronchial carcinoma in France. We report here the results of the study KBP 2000-CPHG in which there were 1868 patients aged 70 or more and 338 aged 80 or more. We compared the patients under 70 (Group I) with those aged 70 or more (Group II) as well as with the details of the over 80's. Group II included significantly more women (17.4% vs 15.2%; p = 0.04), non-smokers (11.2% vs 5.3%; p<0.0001), patients of poor performance status (24.2% vs 14.5%; p<0.0001) and squamous carcinomas (44.5% vs 37.8%; p<0.001) than Group I, but fewer adenocarcinomas (27.2% vs 31.5%; p = 0.009) and as many small cell carcinomas (15.9% vs 16.9%; p = 0.32). In Group II there were less stage III and IV tumours (75.1% vs 78.1%; p = 0.0005) more symptomatic treatment (23.2% vs 6.1%) and radiotherapy alone (12.8% vs 3.8%; p < 0.0001). The results were similar beyond 80 years. On multivariate analysis age, performance status and stage appeared to be independent variables in the choice of curative or symptomatic treatment. Age alone is not therefore a limiting factor in the choice of treatment.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 11/2004; 21(5 Pt 3):8S70-8. · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 11/2004; 21(5):70-78. DOI:10.1016/S0761-8425(04)71564-8 · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There are few data on primary bronchial carcinoma in France. We report here the results of the study KBP 2000-CPHG in which there were 1868 patients aged 70 or more and 338 aged 80 or more. We compared the patients under 70 (Group I) with those aged 70 or more (Group II) as well as with the details of the over 80's. Group II included significantly more women (17.4% vs 15.2%; p=0.04), non-smokers (11.2% vs 5.3%; p<0.0001), patients of poor performance status (24.2% vs 14.5%; p<0.0001) and squamous carcinomas (44.5% vs 37.8%; p<0.001) than Group I, but fewer adenocarcinomas (27.2% vs 31.5%; p=0.009) and as many small cell carcinomas (15.9% vs 16.9%; p=0.32). In Group II there were less stage III and IV tumours (75.1% vs 78.1%; p=0.0005) more symptomatic treatment (23.2% vs 6.1%) and radiotherapy alone (12.8% vs 3.8%; p<0.0001). The results were similar beyond 80 years. On multivariate analysis age, performance status and stage appeared to be independent variables in the choice of curative or symptomatic treatment. Age alone is not therefore a limiting factor in the choice of treatment.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 12/2003; 20(5 Pt 1):691-9. · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The College of General Hospital Respiratory Physicians have conducted a study aimed at a better understanding of the details and modalities of management of patients suffering from bronchial carcinoma in general hospitals in France. A prospective epidemiological study was carried out on all the new cases of histologically proven bronchial carcinoma seen in general hospitals in the year 2000. The data were collected by a standardised questionnaire. 137 centres of investigation identified 5 667 patients, mean age 64.3 years, of whom 16% were women. 7.2% of patients were non smokers (with an incidence of 32.3% non-smokers among the women) and 40.3% were ex-smokers. Histologically 16.9% were small cell carcinomas, 40% squamous carcinomas (43.1% among the men, 23.4% among the women, p<0.0001), 30.1% adenocarcinomas (27.2% among the men, 45.3% among the women, p<0.0001). 77.1% of non small cell carcinomas were stages III and IV, and 66.8% of small cell carcinomas were disseminated, with no difference between the sexes. Respiratory physicians in general hospitals manage more than a quarter of the cases of bronchial carcinoma seen annually in France. The number of women affected is high with a significant percentage of non-smokers and adenocarcinomas.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 12/2002; 19(6):727-34. · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction There are few data on primary bronchial carcinoma in France. We report here the results of the study KBP 2000-CPHG in which there were 1868 patients aged 70 or more and 338 aged 80 or more. Methods We compared the patients under 70 (Group I) with those aged 70 or more (Group II) as well as with the details of the over 80's. Results Group II included significantly more women (17.4% vs 15.2%; p = 0.04), non-smokers (11.2% vs 5.3%; p<0.0001), patients of poor performance status (24.2% vs 14.5%; p < 0.0001) and squamous carcinomas (44.5% vs 37.8%; p<0.001) than Group I, but fewer adenocarcinomas (27.2% vs 31.5%; p = 0.009) and as many small cell carcinomas (15.9% vs 16.9%; p = 0.32). In Group II there were less stage III and IV tumours (75.1% vs 78.1%; p = 0.0005) more symptomatic treatment (23.2% vs 6.1%) and radiotherapy alone (12.8% vs 3.8%; p < 0.0001). The results were similar beyond 80 years. On multivariate analysis age, performance status and stage appeared to be independent variables in the choice of curative or symptomatic treatment. Conclusions Age alone is not therefore a limiting factor in the choice of treatment.