L.M. Fleury

University College Dublin, Dublin, L, Ireland

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Publications (2)1.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: 1276 shoeprints were collected at a scientific exhibition. Details regarding the age groups of the participants, style, size and manufacturer/brand of their shoes were recorded. The impressions were assigned to pattern groups showing that the most common pattern was present in only 1% of the population studied and most patterns were much less common. The impressions were digitized and a system developed for automatically sorting a database of images of outsole patterns in response to a reference image. The database images are ranked so that those from the same pattern group as the reference shoeprint are likely to be at the start of the list. A database of 486 complete shoeprint images belonging to 142 pattern groups was established with each group containing two or more examples. Tests of the system have shown that the first-ranked database image belongs to the same pattern group as the reference image 60% of the time and that a correct match appears within the first 5% of the ranked images 88% of the time. The system has translational and rotational invariance so that the spatial positioning of the reference shoeprint images does not have to correspond with the spatial positioning of the shoeprint images of the database. The performance of the system for matching partial shoeprints was also determined.
    Science & Justice 04/2006; 46(2):79-89. DOI:10.1016/S1355-0306(06)71578-7 · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study developed a system of automatic classification of shoeprint images into groups belonging to the same sole pattern. When presented with an image of a new shoeprint the system displays a ranked sequence of shoeprint images from the database. The shoeprint images are ranked from best match to worst match in terms of the pattern of the shoeprint. For this study a database of 503 shoeprint images belonging to 139 pattern groups was established with each group containing 2 or more examples. The pattern grouping was performed by a panel of human experts. This designed system is a fully automatic method and functions with minimum user intervention. Tests of the system have shown that the first shoeprint image displayed is a correct match 54% of the time and that a correct match appears within the first 5% of displayed shoeprints 75% of the time. The system has translational and rotational invariance so that the spatial positioning of the new shoeprint images does not have to correspond with the spatial positioning of the shoeprint images of the database.
    Image Processing, 2003. ICIP 2003. Proceedings. 2003 International Conference on; 10/2003

Publication Stats

16 Citations
1.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003
    • University College Dublin
      • School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering
      Dublin, L, Ireland