Lea Solman

University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor, Mestna Obcina Maribor, Slovenia

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Publications (4)5.84 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The precise vascular anatomy of posterior lower leg skin is not well understood. Despite being a potential donor site for sural artery perforator flaps, this region is rarely used and underestimated. The aim of this study was to provide exact preoperative planning for medial and lateral sural artery perforator flap harvest. An anatomical study on 16 cadaveric lower legs was performed to determine the number and location of all medial and lateral sural artery perforators in relation to five fixed points (medial and lateral maleolus, calcaneus, medial and lateral condyle). A Duplex study on 32 lower legs determined the number and location of dominant medial and lateral sural artery perforators in relation to same anatomical points. Results of the two studies were correlated. A total of 234 perforators were found in the anatomical (134) and Duplex studies (100). A dominant lateral sural artery perforator was found in 9.4% of all lateral perforators in 31% of dissected legs. A dominant medial sural artery perforator was found in 37% of all medial perforators in 94% of legs. The difference in the number of dominant medial and lateral perforators was significant (p < 0.001) in the anatomical study, while no significant difference was found in the Duplex study (p = 0.920). The anatomical study showed relative unreliability of sural region regarding number of dominant perforators. Therefore, harvest of medial and particularly lateral sural artery perforator flap is unsafe without preoperative perforator mapping. No significant difference in location of dominant perforators was found between Duplex and anatomical studies. Duplex proved reliable for planning of sural artery perforator flaps due to high precision in detecting location of dominant perforators.
    Journal of Plastic Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery 05/2012; 65(11):1530-6. · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Plastic Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery 04/2009; 63(5):e491-3. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to show the effectiveness of preoperative antiseptic mouthwash the authors undertook a prospective study in 120 patients who underwent elective surgery under general or local anesthesia. Patients were allocated toone of 4 groups, depending on whether the oral cavity was washed preoperatively with 1% cetrimide, chlorhexidine, povidon-iodine or sterilized normal saline solution (control group). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial samples were taken from the inferior vestibulum mucosa before surgery, 5 min after the start of the operation and at the end of the procedure. The results show a statistically significant reduction in bacterial counts during procedures in which antiseptics are used to wash the oral cavity preoperatively. 1% cetrimide solution was the most successful in reducing intra-oral bacterial counts and produced the longest lasting antiseptic effect. Chlorhexidine is a good option for procedures longer than 1 hour, while povidon-iodine is recommended for procedures lasting up to 1 hour. Normal saline reduced bacterial counts in the specimen taken 5 min after washing but this short-lasting effect is due to mechanical cleansing rather than the antiseptic effect.
    International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 02/2009; 38(2):160-5. · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Plastic Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery 01/2009; 62(4):553. · 1.44 Impact Factor