Kristin Sjaavik

Universitetet i Tromsø, Tromsø, Troms, Norway

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Publications (3)7.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Surgery has not been proven to be a better treatment option than non-operative management for limb paresis due to lumbar disc herniation. For the patients it will still be a concern, whether they will regain full strength after the operation or not. A prospective cohort study of 91 patients with preoperative paresis due to disc herniation with 1-year follow up was carried out. The primary outcome was muscle strength in affected limb, and the secondary outcome was self-reported symptoms on back and leg pain, disability, health related quality of life, general health and working capability. Seventy-five percent of patients had no paresis 1 year after the operation. The severity of the paresis was the only predictor for persistent paresis. Preoperative duration of the paresis did not influence the rate of full recovery. Non-recovery was associated with inferior outcomes and higher risk for reduced working capability. The majority of patients with paresis were fully recovered 1 year after microdiscectomy for lumbar disc herniation. If the paresis was severe at baseline, there was a four times higher risk for non-recovery. Patients who did not recover had significantly worse outcomes.
    European Spine Journal 12/2011; 21(4):655-9. · 2.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Loss to follow-up may bias the outcome assessments of clinical registries. In this study, we wanted to determine whether outcomes were different in responding and non-responding patients who were included in a clinical spine surgery registry, at two years of follow-up. In addition, we wanted to identify risk factors for failure to respond. 633 patients who were operated for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine were followed for 2 years using a local clinical spine registry. Those who did not attend the clinic and those who did not answer a postal questionnaire-for whom 2 years of outcome data were missing-and who would be lost to follow-up according to the standard procedures of the registry protocols, were defined as non-respondents. They were traced and interviewed by telephone. Outcome measures were: improvement in health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), leg pain, and back pain; and also general state of health, employment status, and perceived benefits of the operation. We found no statistically significant differences in outcome between respondents (78% of the patients) and non-respondents (22%). Receipt of postal questionnaires (not being summoned for a follow-up visit) was the strongest risk factor for failure to respond. Forgetfulness appeared to be an important cause. Older patients and those who had complications were more likely to respond. A loss to follow-up of 22% would not bias conclusions about overall treatment effects and, importantly, there were no indications of worse outcomes in non-respondents.
    Acta Orthopaedica 02/2011; 82(1):56-63. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A frequent concern among patients operated for lumbar disc herniation is the risk of "getting worse". To give an evidence-based estimate of the risk for worsening has been difficult, since previous studies have been more focused on unfavourable outcome in general, rather than on deterioration in particular. In this prospective study of 180 patients, we report the frequency of and the risk factors for getting worse after first time lumbar microdiscectomy. Follow-up time was 12 months. Primary outcome measure was the Oswestry disability index, assessing functional status and health-related quality of life. Of the patients 4% got worse. Independent risk factors of deterioration were a long duration of sick leave and a better functional status and quality of life prior to operation. We conclude that the risk of deterioration is small, but larger if the patient has been unable to work despite relatively small health problems. This study also demonstrates that changes in instrument scores should be reported, so that an accurate failure rate can be assessed.
    European Spine Journal 03/2005; 14(1):49-54. · 2.47 Impact Factor