Kiyoko Oikawa

Kagoshima University, Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan

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Publications (3)4.79 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this cross-over, randomized, single-blinded trial was to examine whether intra-esophageal acidification induces sleep bruxism (SB). Polysomnography with electromyogram (EMG) of masseter muscle, audio-video recording, and esophageal pH monitoring were performed in a sleep laboratory. Twelve healthy adult males without SB participated. Intra-esophageal infusions of 5-mL acidic solution (0.1 N HCl) or saline were administered. The frequencies of EMG bursts, rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes, grinding noise, and the RMMA/microarousal ratio were significantly higher in the 20-minute period after acidic infusion than after saline infusion. RMMA episodes including SB were induced by esophageal acidification. This trial is registered with the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry, UMIN000002923. Abbreviations: ASDA, American Sleep Disorders Association; EMG, electromyogram; GER, gastroesophageal reflux; LES, lower esophageal sphincter; NREM, non-rapid eye movement; REM, rapid eye movement; RMMA, rhythmic masticatory muscle activity; SB, sleep bruxism; SD, standard deviation; UES, upper esophageal sphincter.
    Journal of dental research 01/2011; 90(5):665-71. · 3.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with masticatory dysfunction have a higher incidence of gastrointestinal disorders including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Masticatory function is significantly lower in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion than in those with normal occlusion. However, GERD symptoms in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine GERD symptoms and masticatory functions in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Nineteen adult patients with severe skeletal Class III malocclusion (Class III group) and 20 adults with normal occlusion (control group) participated in this study. The results of the Carlsson-Dent self-administered questionnaire (QUEST) and the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) were compared between the 2 groups, along with occlusal contact area, maximal voluntary bite force, and salivary flow rate. The QUEST and FSSG scores were significantly higher in the Class III group. Occlusal contact area and maximal voluntary bite force were significantly smaller in the Class III group. There was no significant difference in the salivary flow rates between the groups. GERD symptoms were observed more often in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion than in normal subjects as determined by the questionnaires.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 08/2009; 136(1):10.e1-6; discussion 10-1. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Patients with masticatory dysfunction have a higher incidence of gastrointestinal disorders including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Masticatory function is significantly lower in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion than in those with normal occlusion. However, GERD symptoms in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine GERD symptoms and masticatory functions in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Methods Nineteen adult patients with severe skeletal Class III malocclusion (Class III group) and 20 adults with normal occlusion (control group) participated in this study. The results of the Carlsson-Dent self-administered questionnaire (QUEST) and the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) were compared between the 2 groups, along with occlusal contact area, maximal voluntary bite force, and salivary flow rate. Results The QUEST and FSSG scores were significantly higher in the Class III group. Occlusal contact area and maximal voluntary bite force were significantly smaller in the Class III group. There was no significant difference in the salivary flow rates between the groups. Conclusions GERD symptoms were observed more often in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion than in normal subjects as determined by the questionnaires.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. 07/2009; 136(1):10–11.