J J Guroff

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

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Publications (29)136.84 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We are conducting a genome search for a predisposing locus to bipolar (manicdepressive) illness by genotyping 21 moderate-sized pedigrees. We report linkage data derived from screening marker loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and the pseudoautosomal region at Xpter. To analyze for linkage, two-point marker to illness lod scores were calculated under a dominant model with either 85% or 50% maximum penetrance and a recessive model with 85% maximum penetrance, and two affection status models. Under the dominant high penetrance model the cumulative lod scores in the pedigree series were less than −2 at Θ = 0.01 in 134 of 142 loci examined, indicating that if the disease is genetically homogeneous linkage could be excluded in these marker regions. Similar results were obtained using the other genetic models. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted when indicated, but no evidence for linkage was found. In the course of mapping we found a positive total lod score greater than +3 at the D7S78 locus at Θ = 0.01 under a dominant, 50% penetrance model. The lod scores for additional markers within the D7S78 region failed to support the initial finding, implying that this was a spurious positive. Analysis with affected pedigree member method for COL1A2 and D7S78 showed no significance for linkage but for PLANH1, at the weighting functions f(p) = 1 and f(p) = 1/sqrt(p) borderline P values of 0.036 and 0.047 were obtained. We also detected new polymorphisms at the mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) and calmodulin II (CALMII) genes. These genes were genetically mapped and under affection status model 2 and a dominant, high penetrance mode of transmission the lod scores of < −2 at Θ = 0.01 were found. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 06/2005; 54(3):206 - 218.
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    ABSTRACT: A region between D13S71 and D13S274 on 13q32 showed linkage to bipolar disorder (BP) based on a genome scan using markers with an average spacing of approximately 6 cM and an average heterozygosity of approximately 60% [Detera-Wadleigh et al., 1999: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 96:5604-5609]. In an attempt to confirm this finding and achieve fine mapping of the susceptibility region, nine additional microsatellite markers with average heterozygosity of approximately 86%, located between D13S71 and D13S274, were typed in the same sample. The strongest linkage evidence was detected by multipoint linkage analysis (ASPEX program) around D13S779-D13S225 with maximum LOD score of 3.25 under Affection Status Model II (ASM II; P = 0.0000546). Data from additional nine markers resulted in a decrease of the 95% confidence interval of the linkage region. Association analyses with GASSOC TDT and ASPEX/sib_tdt detect potential linkage disequilibrium with several markers, including D13S280 (ASPEX TDT P = 0.0033, ASM I). These data generated using a higher marker density within the proposed susceptibility region strengthen the validity of our previous findings and suggest a finer localization of the susceptibility gene(s) on 13q32.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 06/2001; 105(4):375-80.
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    ABSTRACT: As part of a four-center NIMH Genetics Initiative on Bipolar Disorder, a genome screen using 365 markers was performed on 540 DNAs from 97 families, enriched for affected relative pairs. This is the largest uniformly ascertained and assessed linkage sample for this disease, and includes 232 subjects diagnosed with bipolar I (BPI), 32 with schizo-affective, bipolar type (SABP), 72 with bipolar II (BPII), and 88 with unipolar recurrent depression (UPR). A hierarchical set of definitions of affected status was examined. Under Model I, affected individuals were those with a diagnosis of BPI or SABP, Model II included as affected those fitting Model I plus BPII, and Model III included those fitting Model II plus UPR. This data set was previously analyzed using primarily affected sib pair methods. We report the results of nonparametric linkage analyses of the extended pedigree structure using the program Genehunter Plus. The strongest finding was a lod score of 2.5 obtained on chromosome 10 near the marker D10S1423 with diagnosis as defined under Model II. This region has been previously implicated in genome-wide studies of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Other chromosomal regions with lod scores over 1.50 for at least one Model Included chromosomes 8 (Model III), 16 (Model III), and 20 (Model I). Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 96:18-23, 2000
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 03/2000; 96(1):18-23.
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    ABSTRACT: As part of a four-center NIMH Genetics Initiative on Bipolar Disorder, a genome screen using 365 markers was performed on 540 DNAs from 97 families, enriched for affected relative pairs. This is the largest uniformly ascertained and assessed linkage sample for this disease, and includes 232 subjects diagnosed with bipolar I (BPI), 32 with schizo-affective, bipolar type (SABP), 72 with bipolar II (BPII), and 88 with unipolar recurrent depression (UPR). A hierarchical set of definitions of affected status was examined. Under Model I, affected individuals were those with a diagnosis of BPI or SABP, Model II included as affected those fitting Model I plus BPII, and Model III included those fitting Model II plus UPR. This data set was previously analyzed using primarily affected sib pair methods. We report the results of nonparametric linkage analyses of the extended pedigree structure using the program Genehunter Plus. The strongest finding was a lod score of 2.5 obtained on chromosome 10 near the marker D10S1423 with diagnosis as defined under Model II. This region has been previously implicated in genome-wide studies of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Other chromosomal regions with lod scores over 1.50 for at least one Model Included chromosomes 8 (Model III), 16 (Model III), and 20 (Model I). Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 96:18–23, 2000 © 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 02/2000; 96(1):18 - 23.
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness characterized by mood swings of elation and depression. Family, twin, and adoption studies suggest a complex genetic etiology that may involve multiple susceptibility genes and an environmental component. To identify chromosomal loci contributing to vulnerability, we have conducted a genome-wide scan on ≈396 individuals from 22 multiplex pedigrees by using 607 microsatellite markers. Multipoint nonparametric analysis detected the strongest evidence for linkage at 13q32 with a maximal logarithm of odds (lod) score of 3.5 (P = 0.000028) under a phenotype model that included bipolar I, bipolar II with major depression, schizoaffective disorder, and recurrent unipolar disorder. Suggestive linkage was found on 1q31-q32 (lod = 2.67; P = 0.00022) and 18p11.2 (lod = 2.32; P = 0.00054). Recent reports have linked schizophrenia to 13q32 and 18p11.2. Our genome scan identified other interesting regions, 7q31 (lod = 2.08; P = 0.00099) and 22q11-q13 (lod = 2.1; P = 0.00094), and also confirmed reported linkages on 4p16, 12q23-q24, and 21q22. By comprehensive screening of the entire genome, we detected unreported loci for bipolar disorder, found support for proposed linkages, and gained evidence for the overlap of susceptibility regions for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 05/1999; 96(10):5604-5609. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Four sites collaborated with the NIMH to develop a resource for the genetic study of bipolar (BP) illness. Common methods of ascertainment and assessment were developed in 1989. A series of families with a bipolar I (BPI) proband and at least one BPI or schizoaffective, bipolar type (SA/BP) first-degree relative has been studied. We now report initial data from a genomic survey with an average intermarker interval of 10 cM on 540 subjects from 97 families. This is the largest commonly ascertained and assessed linkage sample for bipolar illness reported to date; it includes 232 subjects with BPI, 32 SA/BP, 72 bipolar II (BPII), and 88 unipolar, recurrent (UPR). Nonparametric methods of analysis were employed, with all sites using affected sib pair analysis. The strongest findings thus far appear to be on chromosomes 1, 6, 7, 10, 16, and 22. Support has also been found for some previously reported linkages, including 21q and possibly Xq26. All these areas (as well as others) will be followed up with additional markers and further analyses. No locus tested thus far meets stringent criteria for an initial finding of significant linkage. Am. J. Med. Genet. 74:227–237, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 12/1998; 74(3):227 - 237.
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    ABSTRACT: An initial genome scan was performed on 540 individuals from 97 families segregating bipolar disorder, collected through the National Institutes of Mental Health Genetics Initiative. We report here affected-sib-pair (ASP) data on 126 marker loci (≈68,000 genotypes) mapping to chromosomes 4, 7, 9, 18, 19, 20, and 21q, under three affection status models. Modest increases in identical-by-descent (IBD) allele sharing were found at the following loci: D4S2397 and D4S391 (P < 0.05) on 4p, D4S1647 (P < 0.05) on 4q, D7S1802 and D7S1869 (low P = 0.01) on 7p, D9S302 (P = 0.004) on 9q, and D20S604 on 20p and D20S173 on 20q (P ≤ 0.05). In addition, five markers on 7q displayed increased IBD sharing (P = 0.046–0.002). Additional ASP analyses on chromosomes 18 and 21q marker data were performed using disease phenotype models defined previously. On chromosome 18, only D18S40 on 18p and D18S70 on 18q yielded a slight elevation in allele sharing (P = 0.02), implying that the reported linkages in these regions were not confirmed. On chromosome 21q, a cluster of markers within an ≈9 cM interval: D21S1254, D21S65, D21S1440, and D21S1255 exhibited excess allele sharing (P = 0.041–0.008). Multilocus data on overlapping marker quartets, from D21S1265 to D21S1255, which were consistent with increased IBD sharing (P < 0.01, with a low of 0.0009), overlapped a broad interval of excess allele sharing reported previously, increasing support for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder on 21q. Am. J. Med. Genet. 74:254–262, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 12/1998; 74(3):254 - 262.
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated whether there is a locus on chromosome 6 that confers an increased susceptibility to schizophrenia using a two-stage approach and nonparametric linkage analysis. Allele sharing identical by descent (IBD) and multipoint maximum likelihood score (MLS) statistics were employed. Results from two tested data sets, a first data set, or genome scanning data set, and a second replication data set, show excess allele sharing for multiple markers in 6q, a chromosomal region not previously reported as linked to schizophrenia. In our genome scanning data set, excess allele sharing was found for markers on 6q13-q26. The greatest allele sharing was at interval 6q21-q22.3 at marker D6S416 (IBD percentage 69; P = 0.00024). The multipoint MLS values were greater than 2.4 in the 11.4-cM interval delimited by D6S301 and D6S303, with a maximum value of 3.06 close to D6S278 and of 3.05 at D6S454/D6S423. We did not confirm, however, the previously described linkage in 6p, when tested in the systematic genome scanning data set. The replication data set also showed excess allele sharing in chromosomal area 6q13-q26, which overlapped with the aforementioned positive linkage area of the genome scanning data set. The highest sharing of the second data set was at D6S424 (IBD percentage 64; P = 0.0004), D6S283 (IBD percentage 62; P = 0.0009), and D6S423 (IBD percentage 63; P = 0.0009). Multipoint MLS analysis yielded MLS values greater than 1 in an area of about 35 cM, which overlaps with the MLS multipoint area of linkage from the genome scanning data set. The multipoint MLS at the D6S454/D6S423 locus was 2.05. In the second data set, the maximum multipoint MLS was located about 10 cM centromeric from the maximum of the genome scanning data set, at the interval D6S424-D6S275 (2.35). Our results provide very suggestive evidence for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia in chromosome 6q from two independent data sets.
    Genomics 08/1997; 43(1):1-8. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A report on an initial genome screen on 540 individuals in 97 families was collected as part of the NIMH Genetics Initiative on Bipolar Disorder. Families were ascertained to be informative for genetic linkage and underwent a common ascertainment and assessment protocol at four clinical sites. The sample was genotyped for 65 highly polymorphic markers from chromosomes 1, 6, 8, 10, and 12. The average intermarker interval was 16 cM. Genotypic data was analyzed using affected sib pair, multipoint affected sib pair, and pedigree analysis methods. Multipoint methods gave lod scores of approximately two on chromosomes 1, 6, and 10. The peak lod score on chromosome 6 occurred at the end of the q-arm, at some distance from the 6p24-22 area previously implicated for schizophrenia. We are currently genotyping additional markers to reduce the intermarker interval around the signals. The interpretation of results from a genome screen of a complex disorder and the problem of achieving a balance between detecting false positive results and the ability to detect genes of modest effect are discussed.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 06/1997; 74(3):247-53.
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    ABSTRACT: A report on an initial genome screen on 540 individuals in 97 families was collected as part of the NIMH Genetics Initiative on Bipolar Disorder. Families were ascertained to be informative for genetic linkage and underwent a common ascertainment and assessment protocol at four clinical sites. The sample was genotyped for 65 highly polymorphic markers from chromosomes 1, 6, 8, 10, and 12. The average intermarker interval was 16 cM. Genotypic data was analyzed using affected sib pair, multipoint affected sib pair, and pedigree analysis methods.Multipoint methods gave lod scores of approximately two on chromosomes 1, 6, and 10. The peak lod score on chromosome 6 occurred at the end of the q-arm, at some distance from the 6p24-22 area previously implicated for schizophrenia. We are currently genotyping additional markers to reduce the intermarker interval around the signals.The interpretation of results from a genome screen of a complex disorder and the problem of achieving a balance between detecting false positive results and the ability to detect genes of modest effect are discussed. Am. J. Med. Genet. 74:247–253, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 05/1997; 74(3):247 - 253.
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    ABSTRACT: We report on an initial genome screen of 540 individuals from 97 families collected as part of the NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Group. Among the individuals studied, 232 were diagnosed with bipolar (BP) I, 72 with BPII, 88 with major depressive disorder-recurrent type (UPR), and 32 with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type (SA/BP). A total of 53 markers on chromosomes 2, 11, 13, 14, and X (average spacing: 11.5 cM) were studied at Johns Hopkins University. Tests for linkage were performed using nonparametric affected sib-pair and whole pedigree methods with three definitions of affected status. Three regions of interest were identified (13q14–32, Xp22, and Xq26–28). On chromosomes 2, 11, and 14, a disease locus with relative risk λi = 1.5 could be excluded in <10% of the genetic distance studied, while a locus conferring λi = 3 or greater could be excluded across at least 96%. The autosomal region that could not be excluded even with λi = 5 was near 13q14–32. In this region, two-point affected sib-pair analyses revealed a pair of consecutive loci with excess sharing (P < 0.05) and a multipoint affected sib-pair LOD score of 1.12. On the X chromosome, nonparametric multipoint affected sib-pair analyses revealed peak total LOD scores of 0.94 on Xp22 and 1.34 on Xq26–28. A locus linked to the markers in Xp22 would have λi = 3.6 in affected brother-brother pairs, while a locus linked to the markers in Xq26–28 would have λi ≥ 1.9 in affected sister-sister pairs. The results on 13q14–32, Xp22, and Xq26–28 suggest areas of interest for further studies. Am. J. Med. Genet. 74:263–269, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 05/1997; 74(3):263 - 269.
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    ABSTRACT: An initial genome scan was performed on 540 individuals from 97 families segregating bipolar disorder, collected through the National Institutes of Mental Health Genetics Initiative. We report here affected-sib-pair (ASP) data on 126 marker loci (approximately 68,000 genotypes) mapping to chromosomes 4, 7, 9, 18, 19, 20, and 21q, under three affection status models. Modest increases in identical-by-descent (IBD) allele sharing were found at the following loci: D4S2397 and D4S391 (P < 0.05) on 4p, D4S1647 (P < 0.05) on 4q, D7S1802 and D7S1869 (low P = 0.01) on 7p, D9S302 (P = 0.004) on 9q, and D20S604 on 20p and D20S173 on 20q (P < 0.05). In addition, five markers on 7q displayed increased IBD sharing (P = 0.046-0.002). Additional ASP analyses on chromosomes 18 and 21q marker data were performed using disease phenotype models defined previously. On chromosome 18, only D18S40 on 18p and D18S70 on 18q yielded a slight elevation in allele sharing (P = 0.02), implying that the reported linkages in these regions were not confirmed. On chromosome 21q, a cluster of markers within an approximately 9 cM interval: D21S1254, D21S65, D21S1440, and D21S1255 exhibited excess allele sharing (P = 0.041-0.008). Multilocus data on overlapping marker quartets, from D21S1265 to D21S1255, which were consistent with increased IBD sharing (P < 0.01, with a low of 0.0009), overlapped a broad interval of excess allele sharing reported previously, increasing support for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder on 21q.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 05/1997; 74(3):254-62.
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    ABSTRACT: We report on an initial genome screen of 540 individuals from 97 families collected as part of the NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Group. Among the individuals studied, 232 were diagnosed with bipolar (BP) I, 72 with BPII, 88 with major depressive disorder-recurrent type (UPR), and 32 with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type (SA/BP). A total of 53 markers on chromosomes 2, 11, 13, 14, and X (average spacing: 11.5 cM) were studied at Johns Hopkins University. Tests for linkage were performed using nonparametric affected sib-pair and whole pedigree methods with three definitions of affected status. Three regions of interest were identified (13q14-32, Xp22, and Xq26-28). On chromosomes 2, 11, and 14, a disease locus with relative risk lambda(i) = 1.5 could be excluded in <10% of the genetic distance studied, while a locus conferring lambda(i) = 3 or greater could be excluded across at least 96%. The autosomal region that could not be excluded even with lambda(i) = 5 was near 13q14-32. In this region, two-point affected sib-pair analyses revealed a pair of consecutive loci with excess sharing (P < 0.05) and a multipoint affected sib-pair LOD score of 1.12. On the X chromosome, nonparametric multipoint affected sib-pair analyses revealed peak total LOD scores of 0.94 on Xp22 and 1.34 on Xq26-28. A locus linked to the markers in Xp22 would have lambda(i) = 3.6 in affected brother-brother pairs, while a locus linked to the markers in Xq26-28 would have lambda(i) > 1.9 in affected sister-sister pairs. The results on 13q14-32, Xp22, and Xq26-28 suggest areas of interest for further studies.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 05/1997; 74(3):263-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Although genetic epidemiological studies of bipolar (BP) illness are consistent with a heritable component, inherited risk factors remain unknown. The goal of the present study is to describe the localization of BP susceptibility loci through linkage strategies, including a genome-wide search. A linkage study of 22 BP families has been performed. These BP families include almost 400 persons, 173 of whom have been diagnosed as having BP I, schizoaffective, BP II with major depression, or recurrent unipolar illness. Using an autosomal dominant disease model with 85% or 50% age-dependent penetrance, and a recessive model with 85% penetrance, linkage analyses were performed assuming a narrow (BP and schizoaffective) or a broad (BP, schizoaffective, or unipolar) definition of the BP spectrum. Affected sibling pairs and affected pedigree member analyses were performed when positive lod scores were observed in multiple pedigrees. The present article describes linkage analysis of 310 DNA markers on chromosomes 1, 5p, 6, 8, 10q, 11q, and 12 to 18. None of the loci examined disclosed compelling evidence for linkage using lod score analyses. Model-independent analysis by multilocus affected pedigree member method in the pericentromeric chromosome 18 region disclosed statistically significant evidence (P < .0001) for a BP susceptibility gene in this region. Multilocus analysis by affected sibling pair method also disclosed evidence for linkage (P < .00008). Our results imply that a BP susceptibility gene exists near the centromere of chromosome 18. Confirmation of this finding (by independent investigators studying different pedigrees) has been published, suggesting that a valid BP disease linkage may have been discovered.
    Archives of General Psychiatry 01/1997; 54(1):27-35. · 13.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In an effort to identify features indicative of underlying bipolarity within the unipolar relatives of bipolar probands, we compared unipolar relatives of bipolars with unipolar relatives of controls. Using data from the Yale-NIMH Collaborative Study of Depression, we compared a number of demographic and clinical features individually, and then developed a logistic regression model for the differences found. Unipolar relatives of bipolars were generally similar to relatives of controls, but they were older and more likely to suffer from more severe, even psychotic, depression, and somewhat less likely to report a brief transition into their illness. A multiple logistic regression model for observed differences was highly statistically significant, but had limited ability to discriminate effectively between the two groups. These findings suggest that more stringent diagnostic criteria might be beneficial if unipolar relatives are counted as affected in linkage studies of bipolar disorder. The ability of this strategy to improve the "clinical phenotype" is limited, however, and other approaches may be needed to identify features of underlying bipolarity and thus to define "caseness" for unipolar relatives in linkage analyses of bipolar disorder.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics 10/1996; 67(5):445-54.
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    ABSTRACT: To explore a possible relationship between trichotillomania, (TTM) (compulsive hair pulling) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), 65 out of 69 (94%) first degree relatives of 16 female probands with severe chronic TTM were compared with two control groups for OCD and for TTM. Three (19%) of the 16 TTM probands had at least one first degree relative with a lifetime history of OCD, and there was an age corrected rate of 6.4% of first degree relatives with OCD. No relative in control group (A) met criteria for OCD. There was a trend (Fishers exact p = .07, two tailed) for a higher rate (age corrected) of OCD in TTM families; these pilot data are consistent with the concept of a spectrum of obsessive compulsive disorders which includes TTM and other pathological grooming behaviours.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 08/1992; 33(5):925-33. · 5.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-one multiplex bipolar (BP) families, suitable for linkage studies, are described. The families include 365 informative persons (whose genotypes can be determined from available DNA samples), 154 of whom have BP, schizoaffective or recurrent unipolar diagnoses. The power of such a series to detect linkage is estimated through simulations under assumptions concerning the inheritance of BP illness, the genetic distances between the illness locus and markers, and marker heterozygosity. It is concluded that this series has greater than 50% power to detect linkage when only 25% of the families are linked to the locus under study. This paper is intended to serve as an introduction to a systematic genomic search for genes causing vulnerability to BP disease among these families. (C) Lippincott-Raven Publishers.
    Psychiatric Genetics 01/1991; · 2.37 Impact Factor
  • Psychiatric Genetics. 01/1991;
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    ABSTRACT: Data from a family study of psychiatric disorders showed higher rates of major affective disorders, eating disorders, and alcoholism in first-degree relatives of 40 bulimic probands than in first-degree relatives of 24 control subjects. More importantly, the data showed higher rates of major affective disorders in relatives of bulimic probands who themselves had no history of major affective disorders than in relatives of control subjects. This significant finding indicates a familial relationship between bulimia nervosa and major affective disorders, which suggests the possibility of a common diathesis.
    American Journal of Psychiatry 12/1989; 146(11):1468-71. · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The NIMH family study consisted of 172 probands with affective disorder and 43 normal control probands. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in relatives over the age of 18 using Research Diagnostic Criteria based on personal interviews, medical records, and family history information. Some families were also genotyped for red cell, serum, and HLA marker loci. Previous analyses of these data have shown that affective disorders aggregate in families. Segregation analyses have not been able to define the mode of inheritance.
    Genetic Epidemiology 02/1989; 6(1):183-5. · 4.02 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
136.84 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Human Genetics
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1982–2001
    • National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
      • Laboratory of Clinical Science
      Maryland, United States
  • 1998
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Saint Louis, MO, United States
  • 1997
    • Thomas Jefferson University
      • Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 1996
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Boston, MA, United States