J. J. Parks

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States

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Publications (9)102.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Imperfections that disrupt the sp(2) conjugation of graphene can alter its electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Here we report on the examination of monolayer chemical vapor deposited graphene imperfections using scanning electrochemical microscopy in the feedback mode. It was found that the sites with a large concentration of defects are approximately 1 order of magnitude more reactive, compared to more pristine graphene surfaces, toward electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, we successfully passivated the activity of graphene defects by carefully controlling the electropolymerization conditions of o-phenylenediamine. With further electropolymerization, a thin film of the polymer was formed, and it was found to be insulating in nature toward heterogeneous electron transfer processes. The use of spatially resolved scanning electrochemical microscopy for detecting the presence and the "healing" of defects on graphene provides a strategy for in situ characterization and control of this attractive surface, enabling optimization of its properties for application in electronics, sensing, and electrocatalysis.
    ACS Nano 03/2012; 6(4):3070-9. · 12.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the conductance of individual optically switchable dithienylethene molecules in both their conducting closed configuration and nonconducting open configuration, using the technique of repeatedly formed break-junctions. We employed pyridine groups to link the molecules to gold electrodes in order to achieve relatively well-defined molecular contacts and stable conductance. For the closed form of each molecule, we observed a peak in the conductance histogram constructed without any data selection, allowing us to determine the conductance of the fully stretched molecules. For two different dithienylethene derivatives, these closed-configuration conductances were (3.3 ± 0.5) × 10(-5)G(0) and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10(-6)G(0), where G(0) is the conductance quantum. For the open configuration of the molecules, the existence of electrical conduction via the molecule was evident in traces of conductance versus junction displacement, but the conductance of the fully stretched molecules was less than the noise floor of our measurement. We can set a lower limit of 30 for the on/off ratio for the simplest dithienylethene derivative we have investigated. Density functional theory calculations predict an on/off ratio consistent with this result.
    ACS Nano 05/2011; 5(6):5115-23. · 12.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to make electrical contact to single molecules creates opportunities to examine fundamental processes governing electron flow on the smallest possible length scales. We report experiments in which we controllably stretched individual cobalt complexes having spin S = 1, while simultaneously measuring current flow through the molecule. The molecule's spin states and magnetic anisotropy were manipulated in the absence of a magnetic field by modification of the molecular symmetry. This control enabled quantitative studies of the underscreened Kondo effect, in which conduction electrons only partially compensate the molecular spin. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism of spin control in single-molecule devices and establish that they can serve as model systems for making precision tests of correlated-electron theories.
    Science 06/2010; 328(5984):1370-3. · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We perform statistical measurements of single molecule conductance in repeatedly-formed metal-molecule-metal junctions at room temperature. Our results on diaminoalkanes are consistent with those reported by the Venkataraman group. We focus on photo-active and photochromic molecules, including a series of transition-metal complexes with different metal centers and endgroups. We compare the trend in conductance across the family of complexes with that expected from electrochemical measurements. We will also report initial results on the voltage dependence of single-molecule conductances and the effects of optical excitations.
    03/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We study individual Co(tpy-SH)2 complexes by connecting them within mechanically controllable break-junction devices that allow us to controllably stretch the molecule while measuring its electrical conductance. At low temperature, this molecule produces the Kondo effect, observed as a peak in the conductance at zero bias. We find that as a function of stretching the Kondo peak splits in two, in distinct contrast to behavior observed in spin-1/2 molecules. The temperature dependence of the Kondo signal for the unstretched molecule is in agreement with the scaling prediction for an underscreened S = 1 Kondo effect. The splitting of the Kondo resonance by mechanical stretching can be explained by a spin-orbit-induced lifting of the degeneracy of the S = 1 triplet upon distortion from octahedral symmetry of the Co ion. We observe evidence of the resultant spin anisotropy in the magnetic-field dependence of the Kondo peaks.
    03/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We report measurements of electron transport through individual molecules and nanoparticles incorporated into electromigrated break junction devices. In low-temperature studies of a thiol-terminated organometallic complex using a mechanically controllable break junction, we have studied the effects of molecular distortions. We find that as a function of stretching the molecule, a zero-bias Kondo peak can split into two finite-bias peaks, reminiscent of singlet-triplet transitions in other types of quantum dots. We discuss possible mechanisms in terms of coupling between broken spatial symmetries and the spin state of the molecule. We also measure devices in which molecules and nanoparticles are contacted by ferromagnetic electrodes, so as to study the interplay of spin polarization with single-electron charging effects.
    03/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the observation of the quantum coherence in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at a C-face 3C-/6H-SiC polytype heterostructure. Electronic confinement and coherence were observed at 1.5 K and high magnetic fields, indicating the presence and confinement of a 2DEG. The measured mobility of the 2DEG is 2000 cm2/V s and the electron sheet density is 2.7×1012/cm2.
    Applied Physics Letters 01/2009; 94. · 3.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The manipulation of single magnetic molecules may enable new strategies for high-density information storage and quantum-state control. However, progress in these areas depends on developing techniques for addressing individual molecules and controlling their spin. Here, we report success in making electrical contact to individual magnetic N@C(60) molecules and measuring spin excitations in their electron tunnelling spectra. We verify that the molecules remain magnetic by observing a transition as a function of magnetic field that changes the spin quantum number and also the existence of non-equilibrium tunnelling originating from low-energy excited states. From the tunnelling spectra, we identify the charge and spin states of the molecule. The measured spectra can be reproduced theoretically by accounting for the exchange interaction between the nitrogen spin and electron(s) on the C(60) cage.
    Nature Material 11/2008; 7(11):884-9. · 35.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We study electron transport through C(60) molecules in the Kondo regime using a mechanically controllable break junction. By varying the electrode spacing, we are able to change both the width and the height of the Kondo resonance, indicating modification of the Kondo temperature and the relative strength of coupling to the two electrodes. The linear conductance as a function of T/T(K) agrees with the scaling function expected for the spin-1/2 Kondo problem. We are also able to tune finite-bias Kondo features which appear at the energy of the first C(60) intracage vibrational mode.
    Physical Review Letters 08/2007; 99(2):026601. · 7.94 Impact Factor