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Publications (2)4.7 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We sought to investigate associations between knowledge about the disease and sick leave, health complaints, functional limitations, adaptation and perceived control. Patients with asthma (n = 101) and COPD (n = 64) underwent lung function tests and completed questionnaires. In addition, all were asked the question: 'what is the diagnosis of your disease?', with the response categories: 'asthma' and 'COPD (chronic bronchitis or emphysema)'. Thirty-five percent of the asthma patients and 30% of the COPD patients did not know their correct diagnosis. Sick leave was not associated with knowledge about the disease in asthma and COPD. In asthma, much knowledge about management of the disease was associated with better adaptation (P = 0.01) and less perceived control over health by external factors (P = 0.02). Knowing the correct diagnosis was associated with less control over health by powerful others (P = 0.02). For COPD, more knowledge about management of the disease was associated with better adaptation (P = 0.02) and less control over health by internal factors (P = 0.01). Knowing the correct diagnosis was associated with less control over dyspnea at work (P = 0.01).
    Patient Education and Counseling 11/2005; 59(1):103-9. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this prospective study was to investigate predictors of 1-year changes in sick leave in workers with asthma. The initial cohort consisted of 111 workers with asthma. One-hundred and one participants completed the follow-up after 1 year. Self-reported sick leave over the past 12 months was reported at baseline and at follow-up. At the start of this study, all participants completed questionnaires on adaptation to functional limitations, psychosocial variables, working conditions, lung function characteristics, disease history characteristics, health complaints and functional limitations, and person characteristics ('potential predictors'). Three multivariate logistic regression models were calculated, with an increase in sick leave, a decrease in sick leave, and stable high sick leave as dependent (outcome) variables, and the potential predictors as independent (explanatory) variables. An increase in sick leave was predicted by a lower level of education and perceiving more functional limitations in activities of daily life. A decrease in sick leave was predicted by spending all energy at work less often and perceiving fewer health complaints in social activities (adaptation criteria 4 and 5). Stable high sick leave was predicted by less job satisfaction, perceiving more support from the employer and perceiving more health complaints in social activities (adaptation criterion 5). Lung function characteristics, or disease history characteristics were not predictive for changes in sick leave in any of the groups. We conclude that adaptation to functional limitations played a major role in changes in sick leave in workers with asthma. Lung function characteristics hardly played a role.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 10/2005; 78(8):633-40. · 2.10 Impact Factor