Jeffrey Cortez

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

Are you Jeffrey Cortez?

Claim your profile

Publications (1)3.3 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the event of an unexpected disturbance to balance, the ability to recover a stable upright stance should depend not only on the magnitude of torque that can be generated by contraction of muscles spanning the lower extremity joints but also on how quickly these torques can be developed. In the present study, we used a combination of experimental and mathematical models of balance recovery by sway (feet in place responses) to test this hypothesis. Twenty-three young subjects participated in experiments in which they were supported in an inclined standing position by a horizontal tether and instructed to recover balance by contracting only their ankle muscles. The maximum lean angle where they could recover balance without release of the tether (static recovery limit) averaged 14.9 +/- 1.4 degrees (mean +/- SD). The maximum initial lean angle where they could recover balance after the tether was unexpectedly released and the ankles were initially relaxed (dynamic recovery limit) averaged 5.9 +/- 1.1 degrees, or 60 +/- 11% smaller than the static recovery limit. Peak ankle torque did not differ significantly between the two conditions (and averaged 116 +/- 32 Nm), indicating the strong effect on recovery ability of latencies in the onset and subsequent rates of torque generation (which averaged 99 +/- 13 ms and 372 +/- 267 N. m/s, respectively). Additional experiments indicated that dynamic recovery limits increased 11 +/- 14% with increases in the baseline ankle torques prior to release (from an average value of 31 +/- 18 to 54 +/- 24 N. m). These trends are in agreement with predictions from a computer simulation based on an inverted pendulum model, which illustrate the specific combinations of baseline ankle torque, rate of torque generation, and peak ankle torque that are required to attain target recovery limits.
    Journal of Neurophysiology 09/2002; 88(2):613-20. · 3.30 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

35 Citations
3.30 Total Impact Points

Top Journals

Institutions

  • 2002
    • Simon Fraser University
      Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada