Jayakaran S Job

Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States

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Publications (27)55.8 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: An increase in noncommunicable disease (NCD) in India has been attributed to an epidemiologic transition whereby, due to urbanization, there is an increase in traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors such as obesity. Accumulated biomarker data on the "Asian Indian phenotype" identify central obesity, which occurs at a lower body mass index (BMI), as a particularly potent risk factor in Asian Indians. A revised WHO case definition for obesity in India [BMI (in kg/m(2)) >25] has identified an obesity epidemic that exceeds 30% in some cities and rivals that in Western nations. This review summarizes 2 key lines of evidence: 1) the emergence of an obesity epidemic in urban and rural India and its contribution to the NCD burden and 2) the role of a "nutrition transition" in decreasing the whole plant food content of diets in India and increasing risk of obesity and NCDs. We then present new epidemiologic evidence from Asian Indians enrolled in the Adventist Health Study 2 that raises the possibility of how specific whole plant foods (eg, nuts) in a vegetarian dietary pattern could potentially prevent obesity and NCDs in a target population of >1 billion persons.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 05/2014; · 6.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the Western Pacific Region, rural women use loose tobacco in betel quid chewing and pipe smoking. We examined the relation between maternal use of tobacco and infant mortality (IM) in a national sample of 24 296 birth outcomes in adult women (n = 6013) in Cambodia. We found that (1) age-adjusted odds of IM were higher for maternal use of any tobacco (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-2.26); (2) age-adjusted odds of IM were higher for cigarette use (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.54- 4.1), use of pipes (OR = 3.09; [95% CI = 1.86-5.11]), and betel quid chewing (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.10-2.17); and (3) these associations remained after multivariable adjustment for environmental tobacco smoke, malnutrition, ethnicity, religion, marital status, education, income, occupation, and urban/rural dwelling. In addition to finding the established association with cigarettes, we also found that maternal use of smokeless tobacco and pipes was associated with higher rates of infant death in Cambodia.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 09/2013; 25(5 suppl):64S-74S. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Smokeless tobacco use in the form of the betel quid is common in the Western Pacific Region, and yet few studies have determined the nicotine delivery of this habit. During a validation substudy, we randomly sampled 201 adults from a rural province of Cambodia and determined nonparametric (bootstrapped) confidence intervals (CIs) for salivary cotinine levels in tobacco users. We found that cotinine levels for daily betel quid use among women (95% CI = 218.6-350.0 ng/mL) were (1) similar to the levels for daily cigarette smoking in men (95% CI = 240.2-317.1 ng/mL) and (2) significantly higher than the levels for daily cigarette smoking in women (95% CI = 71.8-202.7 ng/mL). The 95% confidence range for these habits exceeded the threshold for addiction. Our findings from rural Cambodia indicate that the typical betel quid habit among women supports the same level of nicotine addiction as the typical cigarette habit in men.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 09/2013; 25(5 suppl):84S-91S. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The validity of survey measures of smoked and smokeless tobacco use in the Western Pacific Region is often unknown. We conducted a validation study (n = 201) in a random sample of rural adults in Cambodia. A comparison with salivary cotinine indicated (1) that survey items and pictograms of current tobacco use had an 87% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 78%-93%) sensitivity, 94% specificity (95% CI = 87%-98%), and 93% (95% CI = 85%-97%) positive predictive value in detecting cotinine levels >10 ng/mL; (2) a positive correlation with number of cigarettes smoked (R = 0.34; P = .01); and (3) a positive correlation with the amount of tobacco chewed (R = 0.44; P = .02). The validity of the index for the amount of smokeless tobacco used was enhanced by adding to the index the data from pictograms that were utilized to help participants estimate the amount of loose tobacco used per session. These tobacco items and pictograms were found to have excellent reliability (κ = 0.80-1) over 2 to 3 weeks. Interviewer-administered survey items and pictograms can provide an accurate, quantitative measure of smoked and smokeless tobacco use in rural Cambodia.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 05/2013; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Current data indicate that under conditions of poverty, tobacco is consumed at the expense of basic needs. In a large national sample from Cambodia, we sought to determine whether tobacco consumption declines under extreme conditions of no income and malnutrition. Our major findings are as follows: (1) Among men, there was no significant difference in the number of cigarettes smoked for no income (425, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 395-456) versus >US$2 per day (442, 95% CI = 407-477); (2) among women, there was no significant difference in the amount of loose tobacco (ie, betel quid) consumed for no income (539 g, 95% CI = 441-637) versus >US$2 per day (558 g, 95% CI = 143-973); (3) for the contrast of no income + malnutrition versus >US$2 per day + no malnutrition in a linear model, there was no significant difference for men who smoked (462 vs 517 cigarettes/month, P = .82) or women who chewed (316 vs 404 g tobacco/month, P = .34), adjusting for confounders. Among the poorest and malnourished Cambodian adults, lack of resources did not appear to prevent them from obtaining smoked or smokeless tobacco.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 05/2013; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although current trends indicate that the rate of cigarette smoking tends to be low among women in the Western Pacific Region (<10%), recent epidemiologic data from South Asia (India, Bangladesh) and Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia) identify that a large proportion of women of reproductive age and older chew tobacco-often as part of a betel quid mixture that includes other potentially harmful ingredients (eg, areca nut). Our findings from currently pregnant women identified during a nationwide survey of adult tobacco use in Cambodia indicate that 13.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 8% to 17%) were current users of smoked or smokeless (in the form of a betel quid) tobacco. Most pregnant women who used tobacco indicated that their habit was either initiated (29.1%; 95% CI = 16.3-46.3) or increased (33.7%; 95% CI = 18.3-53.5) during pregnancy. Pregnancy-related symptoms such as morning sickness were reported as the reason for more than half (54.9%; 95% CI = 34.8-73.4) of the currently pregnant users to have started a tobacco habit during their lifetime. Among those pregnant women who did not use tobacco, we found strong associations (odds ratios from 2 to 14) with beliefs about the harmful effects of tobacco on adult health, faith-based beliefs in addictive substances, and beliefs that influential members of the community, health professionals, and children should not use tobacco. Our findings indicate that tobacco cessation and prevention programs in Cambodia should specifically target pregnant and reproductive-age women.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 05/2013; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the relation between maternal smoking and adverse infant outcomes [low birth weight (LBW), and preterm birth (PTB)] during 2007-2008 in San Bernardino County, California-the largest county in the contiguous United States which has one of the highest rates of infant mortality in California. Using birth certificate data, we identified 1,430 mothers in 2007 and 1,355 in 2008 who smoked during pregnancy. We assessed the effect of never smoking and smoking cessation during pregnancy relative to smoking during pregnancy for the 1,843/1,798 LBW, and 3,480/3,238 PTB's recorded for 2007/2008, respectively. To describe the effect of quitting smoking during pregnancy, we calculated the exposure impact number for smoking during pregnancy. Major findings are: (1) relative to smoking during pregnancy, significantly lower risk of LBW among never smoking mothers [OR, year: 0.56, 2007; 0.54, 2008] and for smoking cessation during pregnancy [0.57, 2007; 0.72, 2008]; (2) relative to smoking during pregnancy, significantly lower risk of PTB was found for never smoking mothers [0.68, 2007; 0.68, 2008] and for smoking cessation during pregnancy [0.69, 2007; 0.69, 2008]; (3) an exposure impact assessment indicating each LBW or PTB outcome in the county could have been prevented either by at least 35 mothers quitting smoking during pregnancy or by 25 mothers being never smokers during pre-pregnancy. Our findings identify an important burden of adverse infant outcomes due to maternal smoking in San Bernardino County that can be effectively decreased by maternal smoking cessation.
    Journal of Community Health 04/2013; · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cambodia has very high rates of tuberculosis and smoked tobacco use among adults. Efforts to control both tobacco use and tuberculosis in Cambodia need to be informed by nationally representative data. Our objective is to examine the relation between daily cigarette smoking and lifetime tuberculosis (TB) history in a national sample of adults in Cambodia. METHODS: In 2011, a multi-stage, cluster sample of 15,615 adults (ages 15 years and older) from all regions of Cambodia were administered the Global Adult Tobacco Survey by interviewers from the National Institute of Statistics of Cambodia. RESULTS: Our findings include: 1) among daily smokers, a significant positive relation between TB and number of cigarettes smoked per day (OR = 1.70 [95% CI 1.01, 2.87]) and pack-years of smoking (OR = 1.53 [95% CI 1.05, 2.25]) 2) a non-significant 58% increase in odds of ever having being diagnosed with TB among men who smoked manufactured cigarettes (OR = 1.58 [95% CI 0.97, 2.58]). CONCLUSION: In Cambodia, manufactured cigarette smoking was associated with lifetime TB infection and the association was most evident among the heaviest smokers (> 1 pack per day, > 30 pack years).
    Tobacco Induced Diseases 03/2013; 11(1):8.
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies have considered whether the habitual use of tobacco in Southeast Asia is part of an established pattern of addiction that includes regular alcohol use. As part of a national survey of adult tobacco use in Cambodia (n = 13 988), we found that men who smoked were 2 times more likely to have drank alcohol in the past week (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval = 2.10-3.03). By age 18 to 25 years, 47% of male smokers drank alcohol, and this pattern of alcohol and tobacco use increased to >55% through the fifth decade. Women using smokeless tobacco with betel quid were more likely to be alcohol drinkers (odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.12-1.98). Past week's drinking declined by late middle age and was associated with lower education and being currently married; the behavior was lower in some ethnic groups (ie, Cham). Our findings indicate an important association between alcohol and tobacco use, and raise the possibility that reducing alcohol consumption can be an important component of tobacco control.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 11/2012; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Identifying determinants of intent to quit may aid the design of antitobacco programs and promote effective tobacco control policies. In a nationwide survey in Cambodia, two thirds of tobacco smokers and 45% of female smokeless tobacco users planned to stop in the future. Multivariate determinants of intent in 2279 male smokers were age <37 years, age at initiation ≥18 years, Cham versus Khmer ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] = 6.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-34.89), longer education, and professional occupation. In 1188 female smokeless tobacco users, age <25 years, age at initiation ≥18 years, and tuberculosis (OR = 3.26; 95% CI = 1.61-6.61) were associated with intent. In female smokers (n = 321), age 18 to 25 years at initiation was associated with intent. In male smokers and female smokeless tobacco users, perceived physical advantages of tobacco were inversely associated with intent. These findings underscore the importance of policies and interventions to delay initiation and promote cessation in young people and counteract perceived physical benefits.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 08/2012; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study determined factors associated with quitting tobacco in Cambodia, a country with a high prevalence of men who smoke and women who use smokeless tobacco. As part of a nationwide survey, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 5145 current and 447 former tobacco users who had quit for ≥2 years. Determinants of quitting in multivariate analyses were age >48 years, age at initiation >25 years, ≥7 years of education, income ≥1 US dollar per day, professional (odds ratio [OR] = 2.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-5.01) or labor (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.10-3.56) occupations, and heart disease (OR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.10, 3.42). Smokeless tobacco users were 10-fold less likely to quit (OR = 0.10; 95% = CI 0.05-0.20) than smokers. In conclusion, tobacco cessation among Cambodians was lower than in nations with decades of comprehensive tobacco control policies. Tobacco cessation programs and policies should include all forms of tobacco and target young to middle-aged users before onset of disease and premature death.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 07/2012; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The habitual chewing of betel quid (areca nut, betel leaf, tobacco) is estimated to occur among 600 million persons in Asia and the Asia-Pacific Region. Emerging data from rural Asia indicate that the betel quid is part of traditional medicine practices that promote its use for a wide range of ailments, including infectious disease. In the present study, we examined the association between betel quid, traditional medicine, and infectious disease outcomes. For the purpose of a nationwide, interviewer-administered, cross-sectional survey of tobacco use (including betel quid), we conducted a stratified three-stage cluster sampling of 13 988 adults aged 18 years and older from all provinces of Cambodia. We found an association between the intensity of betel quid use and HIV/AIDS (odds ratio (OR) 2.06, 95% CI 1.09-3.89), dengue fever (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.55-2.72), tuberculosis (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.36), and typhoid (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.95-2.30). These associations were even stronger in women - the primary users of betel quid in Cambodia. Multivariable analyses that controlled for age, gender, income, education, urban versus rural dwelling, receiving care from traditional medicine practitioners, and cigarette smoking did not alter the betel quid-infectious disease association. Our findings raise the possibility of a role of betel quid use in the transmission of infectious disease through pathways such as immunosuppression, oral route of entry for a pathogen (i.e., through injury to the oral mucosa), and contamination (i.e., fecal-oral) of the betel quid ingredients.
    International journal of infectious diseases: IJID: official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases 01/2012; 16(4):e262-7. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There remains a very high rate of smoked and smokeless tobacco use in the Western Pacific Region. The most recent findings from national adult tobacco surveys indicate that very few daily users of tobacco intend to quit tobacco use. In Cambodia, a nation that is predominantly Buddhist, faith-based tobacco control programs have been implemented where, under the fifth precept of Buddhism that proscribes addictive behaviors, monks were encouraged to quit tobacco and temples have been declared smoke-free. In the present study, we included items on a large national tobacco survey to examine the relation between beliefs (faith-based, other) about tobacco, health, and addiction among adults (18 years and older). In a stratified, multistage cluster sample (n = 13,988) of all provinces of Cambodia, we found that (1) 88-93% believe that Buddhist monks should not use tobacco, buy tobacco, or be offered tobacco during a religious ceremony; (2) 86-93% believe that the Wat (temple) should be a smoke-free area; (3) 93-95% believe that tobacco is addictive in the same way as habits (opium, gambling, alcohol) listed under the fifth precept of Buddhism; and (4) those who do not use tobacco are significantly more likely to cite a Buddhist principle as part of their anti-tobacco beliefs. These data indicate that anti-tobacco sentiments are highly prevalent in the Buddhist belief system of Cambodian adults and are especially evident among non-users of tobacco. Our findings indicate that faith-based initiatives could be an effective part of anti-tobacco campaigns in Cambodia.
    Journal of Religion and Health 09/2011; · 1.02 Impact Factor
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    American Journal of Epidemiology 01/2011; 173:S43-S43. · 4.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Waterpipe use is a highly prevalent form of tobacco use in the Eastern Mediterranean Region that is rooted in long-held cultural traditions that predate the use of cigarettes and present a particular challenge for tobacco control efforts. We did a stratified sampling of 4,994 Egyptian men from rural households of Egypt in order to conduct an interviewer-administered prevalence survey to identify differences in attitudes and beliefs toward smoking and smoking cessation between waterpipe users, cigarette smokers, mixed users (cigarette + waterpipe), and non-smokers. We found that cigarette smokers, mixed users, and/or non-smokers were (1) two- to ninefold more likely to believe that smoking decreased adult life expectancy and harmed a fetus than waterpipe users, (2) significantly more likely to believe that smoking is a sin ("haram") than were waterpipe users. Among tobacco users, we found that cigarette smokers and/or mixed users were significantly more likely to indicate pre-contemplation, contemplation, or intention to quit tobacco than waterpipe users. Our findings from rural Egyptian men indicate that waterpipe users are distinct from cigarette smokers in their perception that their form of tobacco use is less harmful and/or less subject to religious proscription. These beliefs may explain why waterpipe users seem less inclined to quit their tobacco habit and need to be considered in the design of tobacco cessation and prevention methods in Egypt and the region.
    Journal of Religion and Health 12/2010; · 1.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Betel-quid use involves the chewing of areca nut, betel leaf, slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), and tobacco. Very few studies that have determined the cotinine levels among adults who use smokeless tobacco in the form of a betel quid. In the present study we sought to compare salivary cotinine levels among chewing tobacco users and cigarette smokers. Methods: We used 2004 census base-maps to randomly sample 201 adults (ages 21 to 84) from a rural province (Kampong Thom). Of these 201 adults, 197 (98% response rate) provided interviewer-administered survey data on tobacco use, saliva samples, and informed consent. The saliva samples were tested for cotinine using the NicAlert (Nymox Corporation) test. Results: We found similar cotinine levels among female betel quid users (mean [95% confidence interval] = 271 ng/ml [198 to 345.8]) and male cigarette smokers (mean [95% confidence interval] = 262 ng/ml [220.9 to 304.6]), and found that this trend continued among daily users (mean [95% confidence interval] = 280 ng/ml [95% CI= 212 to 347.5 ] and 278 ng/ml [95% CI= 237.5 to 318.6], respectively). Among females, we also found that daily betel quid use produced twice the cotinine levels of daily cigarette use (mean [95% confidence interval] = 136 ng/ml [ 95% CI= 55 to 216.5]). Conclusions: Our findings from Cambodia indicate that the smokeless tobacco product (betel quid) commonly used by females delivers the same amount of nicotine as the cigarettes smoked by males. Funding(USA): R01 TW05964-01, National Institutes of Health/Fogarty International Center (Asian Leadership Training for Tobacco Control Research)
    IADR General Session 2010; 07/2010
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    American Journal of Epidemiology 01/2010; 171:S136-S136. · 4.78 Impact Factor
  • American journal of epidemiology 01/2010; 171:S118-S118. · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the demographic characteristics of current tobacco users in Cambodia, particularly women, and to explore the reasons for current tobacco use in demographic subgroups of the Cambodian population. We used a stratified three-stage cluster sample of 13,988 adults aged 18 years and older from all provinces in 2005-2006. Participants completed an interviewer-administered survey that contained items on all forms of tobacco use and on health and lifestyle variables. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to identify demographic predictors of tobacco use. Cigarette smoking occurred among 48.0% of men and 3.6% of women. We estimated that 560,482 women (95% confidence interval, CI: 504,783 to 616 180) currently chewed tobacco (typically as a component of betel quid) and that the prevalence more than doubles with each decade of adulthood up to the point that about half of all older women chew tobacco. Both men and women cited the influence of older relatives as their primary reason for starting to use tobacco. About one out of five rural women who used chewing tobacco started their habit for relief from morning sickness. The highest prevalence of chewing tobacco among women was seen among midwives (67.9%) and traditional healers (47.2%). High rates (66.8%) of cigarette and pipe tobacco use occurred among ethnic minorities who represent hill tribes found throughout south-east Asia. The tobacco epidemic in Cambodia extends far beyond cigarette smoking in men. Tobacco control that focuses only on cigarettes will not address the health burden from smokeless tobacco use in women that may be an integral part of cultural, familial, and traditional medicine practices.
    Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 12/2009; 87(12):905-12. · 5.25 Impact Factor