J-N Hayashida

Kyushu University, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan

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Publications (5)14.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the initiation and progression of autoimmune damage in the lesions of labial salivary glands (LSGs) from primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients by examining the selective localization of T helper (Th) subsets such as Th1, Th2, Th17 regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and follicular T helper cells (Tfh). The expression of cytokines and transcription factors associated with these Th subsets in the LSGs from 54 SS patients and 16 healthy controls was examined using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunostaining. Additionally, infiltrating lymphocytes without germinal centre (GC(-)) and with GC (GC(+)) in the LSGs specimens from eight SS patients were extracted selectively by laser capture microdissection (LCM). The mRNA expression of these molecules was compared between the two sample groups of GC(-) and GC(+) by real-time PCR. The mRNA expression of cytokines and transcription factors of all T helper (Th) subsets in the LSGs from the SS patients was increased significantly in comparison with controls. In LSGs from the SS patients, Th2 and Tfh was associated closely with strong lymphocytic infiltration; however, Th1, Th17 and T(regs) was not. In the selectively extracted lesions of LSGs, Th1 and Th17-related molecules were detected strongly in the GC(-), while Th2 and Tfh-related molecules were detected in the GC(+). In contrast, no significant association with strong lymphocytic infiltration was observed in T(reg)-related molecules. These results indicate that SS has selective localization of Th subsets such as Th1, Th2, Th17 and Tfh in the LSGs, which is associated closely with disease severity and/or status. SS might be initiated by Th1 and Th17 cells, and then progressed by Th2 and Tfh cells via GC formation.
    Clinical & Experimental Immunology 08/2012; 169(2):89-99. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the pathogenesis of localized autoimmune damage in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) by examining the expression patterns of cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors at sites of autoimmune damage. mRNA expression of these molecules in the labial salivary glands (LSGs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 36 SS patients was examined using a real-time polymerase chain reaction-based method. Subsets of the infiltrating lymphocytes and chemokines/chemokine receptors expression in the LSG specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry. Cytokines/chemokine concentrations in the saliva were analysed using flow cytometry or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. mRNA expression of T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors was higher in LSGs than in PBMCs. In contrast, mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines, chemokines [thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22)] and chemokine receptor (CCR4) was associated closely with strong lymphocytic accumulation in LSGs. Furthermore, TARC and MDC were detected immunohistochemically in/around the ductal epithelial cells in LSGs, whereas CCR4 was detected on infiltrating lymphocytes. The concentrations of these cytokines/chemokines were significantly higher in the saliva from SS patients than those from controls, and the concentrations of Th2 cytokines/chemokines were associated closely with strong lymphocytic accumulation in LSGs. These results suggest that SS might be initiated and/or maintained by Th1 and Th17 cells and progress in association with Th2 cells via the interaction between particular chemokines/chemokine receptors. Furthermore, the measurement of cytokines/chemokines in saliva is suggested to be useful for diagnosis and also to reveal disease status.
    Clinical & Experimental Immunology 07/2012; 169(1):17-26. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is characterized by an infiltration of T cells into target organs including the oral mucosa and salivary glands. This study was designed to clarify the molecular mechanism of the local accumulation of pathogenic T cells in cGVHD. The expression of cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors in the buccal mucosa (BM), labial salivary glands (LSG) and PBMC from 16 patients with cGVHD after allogeneic HSCT was examined. The mRNA expression of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines, and several chemokines and chemokine receptors was significantly increased in the BM and LSG from cGVHD patients, in comparison with both those in the BM and LSG from controls, respectively, and also with those in the PBMC from cGVHD patients. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines, macrophage-derived chemokine and CC chemokine receptor 4 was closely associated with a strong T-cell infiltration in the BM and LSG from cGVHD patients. These results suggest that cGVHD might be initiated and/or maintained by Th1/Th0 cells and thereafter progresses in association with Th2 cell accumulation via the interaction of particular chemokine and chemokine receptors.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 4 June 2012; doi:10.1038/bmt.2012.100.
    Bone marrow transplantation 06/2012; · 3.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oral Diseases (2012) 18, 667-672 Objective:  Heightened interest in oral health has lead to an increase in patients complaining of xerostomia, which is associated with various oral mucosal disorders. In this study, we investigated the relationship between Candida species and oral mucosal disorders in patients with xerostomia. Subjects and Methods:  We evaluated whole salivary flow rate and presence of oral mucosal disorders in 48 patients with xerostomia and 15 healthy controls. The number of Candida species was measured as colony-forming units after propagation on selective medium. Identification of Candida at the species level was carried out by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. We then examined the relationship between Candida species and oral mucosal symptoms. Results:  Compared with controls, patients with xerostomia exhibited significantly decreased whole salivary flow rate, increased rate of oral mucosal symptoms, and higher numbers of Candida. Salivary flow rate negatively correlated with the number Candida. Among patients with oral candidiasis, Candida albicanswas isolated from the tongue mucosa and Candida glabratawas isolated from the angle of the mouth. Conclusion:  These results suggest that particular Candida species are involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucosal disorders in patients with xerostomia.
    Oral Diseases 02/2012; 18(7):667-72. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: RCAS1 (receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells) is known to induce apoptosis in its receptor-positive cells. The authors investigated RCAS1 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its association with the apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In 130 patients with oral SCC, the expression of RCAS1 in tumor cells was immunohistochemically examined and the apoptosis of TILs was examined by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) staining. RCAS1 was detected both on the cytoplasm and the membrane of tumor cells in 41 of 130 cases (31.5%). Focusing on the expression at the invasive front interacting with host immune cells, RCAS1 was detected in 22 of 130 cases (16.9%). The percentage of TUNEL-positive TILs in cases with RCAS1-positive SCCs was significantly higher than in cases with RCAS1-negative SCCs (P < 0.0001). RCAS1 can be expressed on oral SCC cells and may be involved in the tumor escape from the host immune system by inducing the apoptosis of TILs.
    Journal of Oral Pathology and Medicine 08/2006; 35(6):361-8. · 2.06 Impact Factor