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Publications (2)1.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the prevalence of anti-tobacco counseling of smokers. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Primary care center. Random sample of 1,228 patients over 14 years of age who visited a doctor or nurse over the year prior to the study. 1) Telephone interview: age, sex, medical history, education, smoking status, number of cigarettes daily, frequency of visits to the doctor, receipt of anti-smoking advice, reason for seeking medical care, the type of professional who saw the patient and the patient's attitude toward the advice. 2) Patient chart: record of advice given. Five hundred sixty-three questionnaires were valid. Smokers made up 37% (95% CI 33%-41%) of the population, with a mean age of 33.37 (18.14 years; 39.1% of men and 36.1% of the women smoked. The prevalence of anti-smoking counseling according to the patient was 62.3% (95% CI: 56-69%). There was little agreement between counseling as reported by the patients and as recorded in the patient's chart (kappa index 0.149, p = 0.01). The mean age of patients advised to quit (34.8 + 10.89 years) was higher than that of those who did not receive advice to quit. Seventy percent of patients who came to the clinic more than 3 times per year reported having been advised to quit, whereas 50% of those who came fewer than 3 times per year were so advised. Among patients who were advised to quit, 78.3% said the advice came when they had come to the clinic about matters related to smoking. According to patients, advice was usually given by a doctor (76.7%). After being advised to quit, 32.55% of the smokers did so, 6.2% of them for longer than 6 months. The percentage of smokers at our clinic is similar to that in the general population. The prevalence of anti-smoking counseling reported by the user is greater than that reported in other studies, but can clearly be improved. Anti-smoking advice is underreported in our patient charts in comparison with patient reports. The patients who receive advice most often are those who come to the clinic frequently and those who come for smoking-related problems. Physicians are the professionals who most often advise patients on smoking.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 08/2002; 38(7):317-21. · 1.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To estimate the prevalence of anti-tobacco counseling of smokers Design Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting Primary care center Subjects Random sample of 1,228 patients over 14 years of age who visited a doctor or nurse over the year prior to the study Measures 1) Telephone interview: age, sex, medical history, education, smoking status, number of cigarettes daily, frequency of visits to the doctor, receipt of anti-smoking advice, reason for seeking medical care, the type of professional who saw the patient and the patient's attitude toward the advice. 2) Patient chart: record of advice given Results Five hundred sixty-three questionnaires were valid. Smokers made up 37% (95% CI 33%-41%) of the popula-tion, with a mean age of 33.37 (18.14 years; 39.1% of men and 36.1% of the women smoked. The prevalence of anti-smoking counseling according to the patient was 62.3% (95% CI: 56-69%). There was little agreement between counseling as re-ported by the patients and as recorded in the patient's chart (kappa index 0.149, p = 0.01). The mean age of patients advi-sed to quit (34.8 ± 10.89 years) was higher than that of those who did not receive advice to quit. Seventy percent of patients who came to the clinic more than 3 times per year reported having been advised to quit, whereas 50% of those who came fewer than 3 times per year were so advised. Among patients who were advised to quit, 78.3% said the advice came when they had come to the clinic about matters related to smoking. According to patients, advice was usually given by a doctor (76.7%). After being advised to quit, 32.55% of the smokers did so, 6.2% of them for longer than 6 months Conclusions The percentage of smokers at our clinic is similar to that in the general population. The prevalence of anti-smoking counseling reported by the user is greater than that reported in other studies, but can clearly be improved. Anti-smoking advice is underreported in our patient charts in comparison with patient reports. The patients who receive advice most often are those who come to the clinic frequently and those who come for smoking-related problems. Physicians are the professionals who most often advise patients on smoking
    Archivos de Bronconeumología. 38(7):317–321.