Huiling Shi

East China Normal University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China

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Publications (5)10.36 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The coronavirus heptide repeat (HR) region in the spike protein induces neutralizing antibodies that block the postfusion core formation and inhibit virus entry into target cells. The HR2 regions for coronaviruses of the same serogroup share high homology. We found that polyclonal antibodies derived from transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus HR2 and upstream region were cross-reactive with the S proteins of the same serogroup in western blotting. The polyclonal antibodies also potently cross-neutralized viruses from the same serogroup. This study provides new insight for designing vaccine and therapeutic reagents against coronavirus infections.
    The New Microbiologica: official journal of the Italian Society for Medical Virology (SIVIM) 10/2012; 35(4):487-90. · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to investigate the cellular uptake and antiviral activity for the M1 zinc finger peptides derived from influenza A and influenza B viruses in vitro. No cellular uptake was detected by fluorescent microscopy for the synthetic zinc finger peptides. When flanked to a cell permeable peptide Tp10, the zinc finger recombinant proteins were efficiently internalized by MDCK cells. However, no antiviral activity was detected against homologous or heterologous virus infections for the synthetic peptides or the Tp10-flanked recombinant proteins, regardless treated with or without Zn(2+). Nevertheless, MDCK cell constitutively expressing the M1 zinc finger peptides in cell nuclei potently inhibited replication of homologous, but not heterologous influenza viruses. Adenoviral vector delivered M1 zinc finger peptides also exhibited potent antiviral activity against homologous viruses challenge. Transduction at 100 PFU dose of recombinant adenovirus efficiently protected 99% of the cells from 100 TCID(50) of different virus infections for both peptides. These results brought new insight to the antiviral researches against influenza virus infections.
    Current Microbiology 01/2011; 62(1):126-32. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The nsp1 protein of the highly pathogenic SARS coronavirus suppresses host protein synthesis, including genes involved in the innate immune system. A bioinformatic analysis revealed that the nsp1 proteins of group I and SARS coronaviruses have similar structures. Nsp1 proteins of group I coronaviruses interacted with host ribosomal 40S subunit and did not inhibit IRF-3 activation. However, synthesis of host immune and non-immune proteins was inhibited by nsp1 proteins at both transcriptional and translational levels, similar to SARS coronavirus nsp1. These results indicate that different coronaviruses might employ the same nsp1 mechanism to antagonize host innate immunity and cell proliferation. However, nsp1 may not be the key determinant of viral pathogenicity, or the factor used by the SARS coronavirus to evade host innate immunity.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 10/2010; 10(7):919-24. · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The proton channels of influenza A virus (A/M2) and influenza B virus (BM2) are essential for viral replication. Previously we have shown that monoclonal antibodies targeting the ectodomain of the A/M2 proton channel have antiviral activity in vitro. In this study, we generated both monoclonal antibody and phage displayed peptide against the eight amino acids comprising the ectodomain of the BM2 proton channel and investigated their antiviral activities in vitro. A cytopathic assay showed that the monoclonal antibody potently protected MDCK cells from homologous, but not heterologous, virus infections. A plaque forming assay showed that viral replication was not completely neutralized, but greatly inhibited, by the monoclonal antibody. In contrast, no antiviral activity was observed for the synthetic native or engineered peptides. These results indicate that antibody targeting the M2 proton channel is a promising therapeutic candidate for treating influenza virus infections, and that antibody structure is important for antiviral activity.
    The New Microbiologica: official journal of the Italian Society for Medical Virology (SIVIM) 10/2010; 33(4):311-7. · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ectodomain of influenza A virus M2 protein (M2e) is composed of 24 amino acids and induces antibodies with inhibitory effect against a broad spectrum of influenza A subtypes in vitro and in vivo. Although relatively conserved, 21 M2e variants emerged in recent influenza A strains, most of the mutations appeared in the middle part of M2e domain. In this study, we characterized the in vitro inhibition efficacy of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) M2e8-7 recognizing the N terminus highly conserved epitope SLLTEVET (aa 2-9) which is common for both M1 and M2 proteins. Peptide binding assay showed that mAb M2e8-7 reacted strongly with M2e and 19 M2e variant peptides. The mAb M2e8-7 potently inhibited the replication of influenza A virus H1 and H3 subtypes in MDCK cells. Two important amino acids in M2e epitope, Threonine at position five and the Glutamic acid at position six, were identified to lead antibody-escaping variants. These results brought new insight in developing vaccine and therapeutic agents against influenza A virus infections.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 06/2009; 385(1):118-22. · 2.28 Impact Factor