H J Möller

Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, München, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (553)1343.54 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco dependence is the most common substance use disorder in adults with mental illness. The prevalence rates for tobacco dependence are two to four times higher in these patients than in the general population. Smoking has a strong, negative influence on the life expectancy and quality of life of mental health patients, and remains the leading preventable cause of death in this group. Despite these statistics, in some countries smokers with mental illness are disadvantaged in receiving intervention and support for their tobacco dependence, which is often overlooked or even tolerated. This statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) systematically reviews the current evidence on tobacco dependence and withdrawal in patients with mental illness and their treatment. It provides seven recommendations for the core components of diagnostics and treatment in this patient group. These recommendations concern: (1) the recording process, (2) the timing of the intervention, (3) counselling specificities, (4) proposed treatments, (5) frequency of contact after stopping, (6) follow-up visits and (7) relapse prevention. They aim to help clinicians improve the care, health and well-being of patients suffering from mental illness.
    European Psychiatry 01/2014; · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco dependence is the most common substance use disorder in adults with mental illness. The prevalence rates for tobacco dependence are two to four times higher in these patients than in the general population. Smoking has a strong, negative influence on the life expectancy and quality of life of mental health patients, and remains the leading preventable cause of death in this group. Despite these statistics, in some countries smokers with mental illness are disadvantaged in receiving intervention and support for their tobacco dependence, which is often overlooked or even tolerated. This statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) systematically reviews the current evidence on tobacco dependence and withdrawal in patients with mental illness and their treatment. It provides seven recommendations for the core components of diagnostics and treatment in this patient group. These recommendations concern: (1) the recording process, (2) the timing of the intervention, (3) counselling specificities, (4) proposed treatments, (5) frequency of contact after stopping, (6) follow-up visits and (7) relapse prevention. They aim to help clinicians improve the care, health and well-being of patients suffering from mental illness.
    European Psychiatry 01/2014; · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry 04/2013; 14(3):154-219. · 3.57 Impact Factor
  • Der Nervenarzt 01/2013; 84(7). · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful and these guidelines are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia.
    The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry 07/2012; · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: On the background of the growing evidence that the patient's functioning significantly influences the course and outcome of schizophrenia aims of this analysis were to examine what proportion of patients achieve functional outcome criteria after one year and to identify clinical and sociodemographic predictive factors for functional remission. Patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia who are treated as inpatients at the beginning of the study were examined within a naturalistic follow-up trial. The present study reports on the time frame from admission to discharge of an inpatient treatment period and the 1-year follow-up assessment. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) were evaluated with respect to functional outcome, whereas Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores were rated as psychopathological outcome measures. Functional remission thresholds were defined according to a GAF score of ≥61 points and a SOFAS score ≥61 points. Symptomatic remission criteria were applied according to the remission criteria of the Schizophrenia Working Group. The Strauss-Carpenter Prognostic Scale (SCPS), the Phillips Premorbid Adjustment Scale, medical history, sociodemographic and psychopathologic parameters were evaluated in order to find valuable predictors for functional remission. One year after discharge from inpatient treatment 211 out of 474 patients were available for analysis according to both functional remission considered rating-scales (GAF and SOFAS). Forty-seven percent of patients fulfilled criteria for functional remission (GAF and SOFAS) at discharge and 51% of patients at the one-year follow-up visit. With regard to symptomatic remission criteria corresponding remitter rates were 61% of patients at discharge and 54% at the one-year follow-up visit. Forty-two percent of patients fulfilled both remission criteria at discharge and 37% at the one-year follow-up visit. A significant association was found between functional and symptomatic remission at discharge and at the one-year follow-up visit (p<0.001). The strongest predictors for functional remission at the one-year follow-up visit were: a higher SCPS total score at admission, a lower number of previous hospitalizations, a status of employment, lower scores in all PANSS subscales at discharge, a better premorbid social adjustment, the occurrence of a first psychotic episode, a younger age, a lower PANSS negative subscore at admission, a status of being an early responder, a shorter duration of inpatient-treatment, a higher age of onset and female gender.
    Psychiatry Research 03/2012; · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age has been reported to influence amplitude and latency of the P300 potential. Nevertheless, it is not yet fully understood which brain regions are responsible for these effects. The aim of this study was to investigate age-effects on the P300 potential and the simultaneously acquired BOLD signal of functional MRI. 32 healthy male subjects were investigated using an auditory oddball paradigm. The functional MRI data were acquired in temporal synchrony to the task. The evoked potential data were recorded during the intervals in between MR image acquisitions in order to reduce the influence of the scanner noise on the presentation of the tones and to reduce gradient artifacts. The age-effects were calculated by means of regression analyses. In addition, brain regions modulated by the task-induced amplitude variation of the P300 were identified (single trial analysis). The results indicated an age effect on the P300 amplitude. Younger subjects demonstrated increased parietal P300 amplitudes and increased BOLD responses in a network of brain regions including the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, the insula, the temporo-parietal junction, the superior temporal gyrus, the caudate body, the amygdala and the parahippocampal gyrus. Single trial coupling of EEG and fMRI indicated that P300 amplitudes were predominantly associated with neural responses in the anterior cingulate cortex, the putamen and temporal brain areas. Taken together, the results indicate diminished neural responses in older compared to younger subjects especially in frontal, temporo-parietal and subcortical brain regions.
    NeuroImage 02/2012; 60(4):2027-34. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Zusammenfassung Hintergrund Kortikale Konnektivität liegt kognitiver Leistung beim Menschen zugrunde. Für Gedächtnisprozesse wichtig ist die Verbindung zwischen dem Kortex des posterioren Zingulums und dem Hippokampus, direkt wie indirekt über den parahippokampalen Gyrus. Diese Gehirnteile gehören zum Default-Mode-Netzwerk (DMN), einem funktionellen Netzwerk, das unter Ruhebedingungen Aktivität aufweist. Die Alzheimer-Krankheit erlaubt es, die strukturelle Grundlage der funktionellen Konnektivität im Gehirn zu untersuchen. Probanden und Methoden Insgesamt 18 Patienten mit leichter bis mäßiger Alzheimer-Krankheit (Alzheimer’s disease, AD), 16 Patienten mit leichter kognitiver Störung („mild cognitive impairment“, MCI) und 20 gesunde Kontrollpersonen wurden unter Verwendung eines MR-Tomographen mit 3,0 Tesla untersucht. Mithilfe der Diffusionstensorbildgebung ( „diffusion tensor imaging“, DTI) wurde die strukturelle Konnektivität der Fasertrakte des posterioren Zingulums anhand der Werte der fraktionellen Anisotropie (FA) unter Farbkodierung bestimmt. Mit der funktionellen Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) unter Ruhebedingungen erfolgte die Untersuchung der funktionellen Konnektivität zwischen dem Kortex des posterioren Zingulums und dem Hippokampus in einer Korrelationsanalyse der BOLD („blood oxygenation level dependent“) -Signalzeitverläufe. Des Weiteren wurde der Zusammenhang von Struktur und Funktion (effektive Konnektivität) zwischen dem Kortex des posterioren Zingulums und dem Hippokampus in einer multiplen linearen Regressionsanalyse unter Kombination der DTI- und fMRT-Daten bestimmt. Ergebnisse Die Messung der strukturellen Konnektivität ergab bei AD-Patienten ansatzweise eine Reduktion in den Fasertrakten des linken posterioren Zingulums. Sie wurde teilweise durch das Alter erklärt. Eine hohe funktionelle Konnektivität zwischen dem Kortex des posterioren Zingulums und dem Hippokampus, auf direktem wie indirektem Pfad über den parahippokampalen Gyrus, bestand bei allen drei Untersuchungsgruppen. Die Bestimmung der effektiven Konnektivität ergab auf dem direkten Pfad bei AD und MCI für beide Hemisphären, bei den gesunden Probanden für die rechte Hemisphäre einen negativen FA-moderierten Zusammenhang. Der indirekte Pfad zeigte bei AD in der rechten Hemisphäre und bei MCI in beiden Hemisphären einen negativen FA-moderierten Zusammenhang. Bei den gesunden Probanden bestand auf dem indirekten Pfad ein positiver FA-moderierter Zusammenhang in der linken Hemisphäre. Schlussfolgerung Diese Studie ergibt Hinweise, dass bei AD und MCI die Mikrostruktur des posterioren Zingulums gestört ist. Zwischen dem Kortex des posterioren Zingulums und dem Hippokampus besteht direkt wie indirekt im Ruhezustand funktionelle Konnektivität. Die Bestimmung der effektiven Konnektivität im DMN zeigte, dass bei Gesunden die Funktion zwischen dem Kortex des posterioren Zingulums und dem Hippokampus vor allem indirekt vermittelt wird. Bei AD und MCI wies dieser Zusammenhang Veränderungen auf, möglicherweise aufgrund einer bereits vorhandenen Schädigung des parahippokampalen Gyrus. Als Fazit ist festzuhalten, dass die Verbindung von DTI und fMRT einen größeren Einblick in die Konnektivität des menschlichen Gehirns sowie deren pathologische Veränderungen bei einer AD ermöglicht. Hieraus könnte zukünftig ein Ansatz zur Frühdiagnose der AD mithilfe multimodaler Bildgebungsverfahren entstehen.
    Der Nervenarzt 07/2011; · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the context of the development of DSM-V and ICD-11 it appears to be useful to get further data on the validity of the diagnostic differentiation between schizophrenic and affective disorders. This study investigated the relevance of the main diagnostic groups schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis and affective disorder in the context of different diagnostic systems (ICD-9, ICD-10, DSM -IV), assessing their time stability, long-term courses, types and functional outcome. A total of 323 first hospitalized inpatients of the Psychiatric Department of the University Munich were recruited at index time. The full follow-up evaluation including standardized assessment procedures could be performed in 197 patients. The re-diagnosis of the patients' disorders shows that with the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10 or DSM-IV, the group of affective disorders increased numerically while the diagnostic groups of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders decreased in size. The structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (SCID) analysis showed that altogether ICD-10 and DSM-IV had a relatively high diagnostic stability. Of the patients with an ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia, 57% had a chronic course; 61% of the patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia. Patients with affective disorders, according either to ICD-10 or DSM-IV, had in more than 90% of the cases an episodic-remitting course. In terms of prediction of long-term outcome regarding the differentiation between chronic and non-chronic course, the ICD-10 diagnoses did give a slightly better predictive result than a dimensional approach based on the key psychopathological syndrome scores. The differentiation between schizophrenic and affective disorders seems meaningful especially under predictive aspects. A dimensional syndromatological description does not exceed the predictive power of the investigated main diagnostic categories, but might increase the clinically relevant information.
    European Psychiatry 05/2011; 26(4):231-43. · 3.29 Impact Factor
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2011; 26:194-194.
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2011; 26:160-160.
  • Schizophr Bull. 01/2011;
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2011; 26:1151-1151.
  • T.C. Baghai, H.J. Möller, S. Nitschmann
    Der Internist 11/2010; 51(11):1456-1458. · 0.33 Impact Factor
  • T C Baghai, H J Möller, S Nitschmann
    Der Internist 10/2010; 51(11):1456-8. · 0.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of this study was to assess subjective well-being in schizophrenia inpatients and to find variables predictive for response and remission of subjective well-being. The subjective well-being under neuroleptic treatment scale (SWN-K) was used in 232 schizophrenia patients within a naturalistic multicenter trial. Early response was defined as a SWN-K total score improvement of 20% and by at least 10 points within the first 2 treatment weeks, response as an improvement in SWN-K total score of at least 20% and by at least 10 points from admission to discharge and remission in subjective well-being as a total score of more or equal to 80 points at discharge. Logistic regression and CART analyses were used to determine valid predictors of subjective well-being outcome. Twenty-nine percent of the patients were detected to be SWN-K early responders, 40% fulfilled criteria for response in subjective well-being and 66% fulfilled criteria for remission concerning subjective well-being. Among the investigated predictors, SWN-K early improvement and the educational status were significantly associated with SWN-K response. The SWN-K total score at baseline showed a significant negative predictive value for response. Baseline SWN-K total score, PANSS global subscore, and side effects as well as the educational status were found to be significantly predictive for remission. Depressive symptoms should be radically treated and side effects closely monitored to improve the patient's subjective well-being. The important influence of subjective well-being on overall treatment outcome could be underlined.
    European Psychiatry 04/2010; 26(5):284-92. · 3.29 Impact Factor
  • H J Möller, D Rujescu
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    ABSTRACT: Pharmacogenetic influences on therapeutic response to e.g. antidepressant or neuroleptic treatment are poorly understood and the lack of efficacy in many of the patients together with side effects can both limit therapy and compliance. Thus the aim of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics is to provide predictive tools for the response to psychopharmacologic agents in the therapy of psychiatric disorders and in that ways to provide a real personalized psychiatry. The following review will summarize the current stage of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics and will critically discuss the possibilities of a personalized medicine.
    European Psychiatry 04/2010; 25(5):291-3. · 3.29 Impact Factor
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2010; 25:1594-1594.
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2010; 25:64-64.
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    ABSTRACT: A trio of genome-wide association studies recently reported sequence variants at three loci to be significantly associated with schizophrenia. No sequence polymorphism had been unequivocally (P<5 × 10(-8)) associated with schizophrenia earlier. However, one variant, rs1344706[T], had come very close. This polymorphism, located in an intron of ZNF804A, was reported to associate with schizophrenia with a P-value of 1.6 × 10(-7), and with psychosis (schizophrenia plus bipolar disorder) with a P-value of 1.0 × 10(-8). In this study, using 5164 schizophrenia cases and 20,709 controls, we replicated the association with schizophrenia (odds ratio OR = 1.08, P = 0.0029) and, by adding bipolar disorder patients, we also confirmed the association with psychosis (added N = 609, OR = 1.09, P = 0.00065). Furthermore, as it has been proposed that variants such as rs1344706[T]-common and with low relative risk-may also serve to identify regions harboring less common, higher-risk susceptibility alleles, we searched
    01/2010; 16:59-66.

Publication Stats

5k Citations
1,343.54 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 1970–2014
    • Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich
      • • Department of Psychiatry
      • • Hospital and Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Poli
      • • Department of Pediatric Psychosomatic Medicine
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2008–2012
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg
      • Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
      Halle-on-the-Saale, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
    • Medical University of Vienna
      • Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 2009
    • Universität Ulm
      • Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie III (Ulm)
      Ulm, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
  • 2000–2005
    • Klinikum Stuttgart
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1994–2002
    • University of Vienna
      • Neurological Clinic
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 2001
    • University Hospital Frankfurt
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
  • 1996–2001
    • Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
      Jena, Thuringia, Germany
  • 1998–2000
    • University of Cologne
      • Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Evangelische Kliniken Bonn
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg
      Magdeburg, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
  • 1999
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Berlin, Land Berlin, Germany
    • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
      • Klinik für Psychiatrie, Psychosomatik und Psychotherapie
      Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany
  • 1998–1999
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Laboratory of Neurosciences (LNS)
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 1990–1998
    • University of Bonn
      • • Department of Neurobiology
      • • Klinik und Poliklinik für Nuklearmedizin
      • • Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1997
    • University of Freiburg
      Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1992–1994
    • University of Bonn - Medical Center
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1987–1989
    • Technische Universität München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1981–1988
    • Deutsches Herzzentrum München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1980–1988
    • Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry
      München, Bavaria, Germany