Adrian F Ochsenbein

Inselspital, Universitätsspital Bern, Berna, Bern, Switzerland

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Publications (76)721.04 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Binding of CD47 to signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), an inhibitory receptor, negatively regulates phagocytosis. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), CD47 is overexpressed on peripheral blasts and leukemia stem cells and inversely correlates with survival. Aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between CD47 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a bone marrow (BM) tissue microarray (TMA) and clinical outcome in AML patients. CD47 staining on BM leukemia blasts was scored semi-quantitatively and correlated with clinical parameters and known prognostic factors in AML. Low (scores 0-2) and high (score 3) CD47 protein expression were observed in 75% and 25% of AML patients. CD47 expression significantly correlated with percentage BM blast infiltration and peripheral blood blasts. Moreover, high CD47 expression was associated with nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene mutations. In contrast, CD47 expression did not significantly correlate with overall or progression free survival or response to therapy. In summary, a BM TMA permits rapid and reproducible semi-quantitative analysis of CD47 protein expression by IHC. While CD47 expression on circulating AML blasts has been shown to be a negative prognostic marker for a very defined population of AML patients with NK AML, CD47 expression on AML BM blasts is not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Leukemia research 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.leukres.2015.04.007 · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal was to demonstrate that tailored therapy, according to tumor histology and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, and the introduction of novel drug combinations in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer are promising for further investigation. We conducted a multicenter phase II trial with mandatory EGFR testing and 2 strata. Patients with EGFR wild type received 4 cycles of bevacizumab, pemetrexed, and cisplatin, followed by maintenance with bevacizumab and pemetrexed until progression. Patients with EGFR mutations received bevacizumab and erlotinib until progression. Patients had computed tomography scans every 6 weeks and repeat biopsy at progression. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) ≥ 35% at 6 months in stratum EGFR wild type; 77 patients were required to reach a power of 90% with an alpha of 5%. Secondary end points were median PFS, overall survival, best overall response rate (ORR), and tolerability. Further biomarkers and biopsy at progression were also evaluated. A total of 77 evaluable patients with EGFR wild type received an average of 9 cycles (range, 1-25). PFS at 6 months was 45.5%, median PFS was 6.9 months, overall survival was 12.1 months, and ORR was 62%. Kirsten rat sarcoma oncogene mutations and circulating vascular endothelial growth factor negatively correlated with survival, but thymidylate synthase expression did not. A total of 20 patients with EGFR mutations received an average of 16 cycles. PFS at 6 months was 70%, median PFS was 14 months, and ORR was 70%. Biopsy at progression was safe and successful in 71% of the cases. Both combination therapies were promising for further studies. Biopsy at progression was feasible and will be part of future SAKK studies to investigate molecular mechanisms of resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Clinical Lung Cancer 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.cllc.2015.02.007 · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: - Copyright © 2015, Ferrata Storti Foundation.
    Haematologica 02/2015; DOI:10.3324/haematol.2014.119602 · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    Leukemia 02/2015; DOI:10.1038/leu.2015.26 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neutropenia is probably the strongest known predisposition to infection with otherwise harmless environmental or microbiota-derived species. Because initial swarming of neutrophils at the site of infection occurs within minutes, rather than the hours required to induce "emergency granulopoiesis," the relevance of having high numbers of these cells available at any one time is obvious. We observed that germ-free (GF) animals show delayed clearance of an apathogenic bacterium after systemic challenge. In this article, we show that the size of the bone marrow myeloid cell pool correlates strongly with the complexity of the intestinal microbiota. The effect of colonization can be recapitulated by transferring sterile heat-treated serum from colonized mice into GF wild-type mice. TLR signaling was essential for microbiota-driven myelopoiesis, as microbiota colonization or transferring serum from colonized animals had no effect in GF MyD88(-/-)TICAM1(-/-) mice. Amplification of myelopoiesis occurred in the absence of microbiota-specific IgG production. Thus, very low concentrations of microbial Ags and TLR ligands, well below the threshold required for induction of adaptive immunity, sets the bone marrow myeloid cell pool size. Coevolution of mammals with their microbiota has probably led to a reliance on microbiota-derived signals to provide tonic stimulation to the systemic innate immune system and to maintain vigilance to infection. This suggests that microbiota changes observed in dysbiosis, obesity, or antibiotic therapy may affect the cross talk between hematopoiesis and the microbiota, potentially exacerbating inflammatory or infectious states in the host.
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    C Riether, C M Schürch, A F Ochsenbein
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    ABSTRACT: Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare, multipotent cells that generate via progenitor and precursor cells of all blood lineages. Similar to normal hematopoiesis, leukemia is also hierarchically organized and a subpopulation of leukemic cells, the leukemic stem cells (LSCs), is responsible for disease initiation and maintenance and gives rise to more differentiated malignant cells. Although genetically abnormal, LSCs share many characteristics with normal HSCs, including quiescence, multipotency and self-renewal. Normal HSCs reside in a specialized microenvironment in the bone marrow (BM), the so-called HSC niche that crucially regulates HSC survival and function. Many cell types including osteoblastic, perivascular, endothelial and mesenchymal cells contribute to the HSC niche. In addition, the BM functions as primary and secondary lymphoid organ and hosts various mature immune cell types, including T and B cells, dendritic cells and macrophages that contribute to the HSC niche. Signals derived from the HSC niche are necessary to regulate demand-adapted responses of HSCs and progenitor cells after BM stress or during infection. LSCs occupy similar niches and depend on signals from the BM microenvironment. However, in addition to the cell types that constitute the HSC niche during homeostasis, in leukemia the BM is infiltrated by activated leukemia-specific immune cells. Leukemic cells express different antigens that are able to activate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. It is well documented that activated T cells can contribute to the control of leukemic cells and it was hoped that these cells may be able to target and eliminate the therapy-resistant LSCs. However, the actual interaction of leukemia-specific T cells with LSCs remains ill-defined. Paradoxically, many immune mechanisms that evolved to activate emergency hematopoiesis during infection may actually contribute to the expansion and differentiation of LSCs, promoting leukemia progression. In this review, we summarize mechanisms by which the immune system regulates HSCs and LSCs.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 4 July 2014; doi:10.1038/cdd.2014.89.
    Cell Death and Differentiation 07/2014; 22(2). DOI:10.1038/cdd.2014.89 · 8.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Molecular subclassification of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is essential to improve clinical outcome. This study assessed the prognostic and predictive value of circulating micro-RNA (miRNA) in patients with non-squamous NSCLC enrolled in the phase II SAKK (Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research) trial 19/05, receiving uniform treatment with first-line bevacizumab and erlotinib followed by platinum-based chemotherapy at progression.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 05/2014; 85(2). DOI:10.1016/j.lungcan.2014.04.014 · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • Christian M Schürch, Carsten Riether, Adrian F Ochsenbein
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    ABSTRACT: Cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells (CTLs) play a major role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, but a complete clearance of pathogens and return to homeostasis requires the regulated interplay of the innate and acquired immune systems. Here, we show that interferon γ (IFNγ) secreted by effector CTLs stimulates hematopoiesis at the level of early multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells and induces myeloid differentiation. IFNγ did not primarily affect hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells directly. Instead, it promoted the release of hematopoietic cytokines, including interleukin 6 from bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the hematopoietic stem cell niche, which in turn reduced the expression of the transcription factors Runx-1 and Cebpα in early hematopoietic progenitor cells and increased myeloid differentiation. Therefore, our study indicates that, during an acute viral infection, CTLs indirectly modulate early multipotent hematopoietic progenitors via MSCs in order to trigger the temporary activation of emergency myelopoiesis and promote clearance of the infection.
    Cell stem cell 02/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.stem.2014.01.002 · 22.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Survivin is a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis family. Essential for tumor cell survival and overexpressed in most cancers, survivin is a promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Immunogenicity has been demonstrated in multiple cancers. Nonetheless, few clinical trials have demonstrated survivin-vaccine-induced immune responses. This phase I trial was conducted to test whether vaccine EMD640744, a cocktail of five HLA class I-binding survivin peptides in Montanide(®) ISA 51 VG, promotes anti-survivin T-cell responses in patients with solid cancers. The primary objective was to compare immunologic efficacy of EMD640744 at doses of 30, 100, and 300 μg. Secondary objectives included safety, tolerability, and clinical efficacy. In total, 49 patients who received ≥2 EMD640744 injections with available baseline- and ≥1 post-vaccination samples [immunologic-diagnostic (ID)-intention-to-treat] were analyzed by ELISpot- and peptide/MHC-multimer staining, revealing vaccine-activated peptide-specific T-cell responses in 31 patients (63 %). This cohort included the per study protocol relevant ID population for the primary objective, i.e., T-cell responses by ELISpot in 17 weeks following first vaccination, as well as subjects who discontinued the study before week 17 but showed responses to the treatment. No dose-dependent effects were observed. In the majority of patients (61 %), anti-survivin responses were detected only after vaccination, providing evidence for de novo induction. Best overall tumor response was stable disease (28 %). EMD640744 was well tolerated; local injection-site reactions constituted the most frequent adverse event. Vaccination with EMD640744 elicited T-cell responses against survivin peptides in the majority of patients, demonstrating the immunologic efficacy of EMD640744.
    Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 02/2014; DOI:10.1007/s00262-013-1516-5 · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The integrin antagonist cilengitide has been explored as an adjunct with anti-angiogenic properties to standard of care temozolomide chemoradiotherapy (TMZ/RT → TMZ) in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Preclinical data as well as anecdotal clinical observations indicate that anti-angiogenic treatment may result in altered patterns of tumor progression. Using a standardized approach, we analyzed patterns of progression on MRI in 21 patients enrolled onto a phase 2 trial of cilengitide added to TMZ/RT → TMZ in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Thirty patients from the experimental treatment arm of the EORTC/NCIC pivotal TMZ trial served as a reference. MRIcro software was used to map location and extent of initial preoperative and recurrent tumors on MRI of both groups into the same stereotaxic space which were then analyzed using an automated tool of image analysis. Clinical and outcome data of the cilengitide-treated patients were similar to those of the EORTC/NCIC trial except for a higher proportion of patients with a methylated O(6)-methylguanyl-DNA-methyltransferase gene promoter. Analysis of recurrence pattern revealed neither a difference in the size of the recurrent tumor nor in the distance of the recurrences from the preoperative tumor location between groups. Overall frequencies of distant recurrences were 20 % in the reference group and 19 % (4/21 patients) in the cilengitide group. Compared with TMZ/RT → TMZ alone, the addition of cilengitide does not alter patterns of progression. This analysis does not support concerns that integrin antagonism by cilengitide may induce a more aggressive phenotype at progression, but also provides no evidence for an anti-invasive activity of cilengitide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 01/2014; DOI:10.1007/s11060-014-1365-x · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a potent amplifier of pro-inflammatory innate immune reactions. While TREM-1-amplified responses likely aid an improved detection and elimination of pathogens, excessive production of cytokines and oxygen radicals can also severely harm the host. Studies addressing the pathogenic role of TREM-1 during endotoxin-induced shock or microbial sepsis have so far mostly relied on the administration of TREM-1 fusion proteins or peptides representing part of the extracellular domain of TREM-1. However, binding of these agents to the yet unidentified TREM-1 ligand could also impact signaling through alternative receptors. More importantly, controversial results have been obtained regarding the requirement of TREM-1 for microbial control. To unambiguously investigate the role of TREM-1 in homeostasis and disease, we have generated mice deficient in Trem1. Trem1(-/-) mice are viable, fertile and show no altered hematopoietic compartment. In CD4(+) T cell- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced models of colitis, Trem1(-/-) mice displayed significantly attenuated disease that was associated with reduced inflammatory infiltrates and diminished expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Trem1(-/-) mice also exhibited reduced neutrophilic infiltration and decreased lesion size upon infection with Leishmania major. Furthermore, reduced morbidity was observed for influenza virus-infected Trem1(-/-) mice. Importantly, while immune-associated pathologies were significantly reduced, Trem1(-/-) mice were equally capable of controlling infections with L. major, influenza virus, but also Legionella pneumophila as Trem1(+/+) controls. Our results not only demonstrate an unanticipated pathogenic impact of TREM-1 during a viral and parasitic infection, but also indicate that therapeutic blocking of TREM-1 in distinct inflammatory disorders holds considerable promise by blunting excessive inflammation while preserving the capacity for microbial control.
    PLoS Pathogens 01/2014; 10(1):e1003900. DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003900 · 8.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Molecular subclassification of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is essential to improve clinical outcome. This study assessed the prognostic and predictive value of circulating micro-RNA (miRNA) in patients with non-squamous NSCLC enrolled in the phase II SAKK (Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research) trial 19/05, receiving uniform treatment with first-line bevacizumab and erlotinib followed by platinum-based chemotherapy at progression. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with baseline and 24 hours blood samples were included from SAKK 19/05. The primary study endpoint was to identify prognostic (overall survival, OS) miRNA's. Patient samples were analyzed with Agilent human miRNA 8 × 60 K microarrays, each glass slide formated with eight high-definition 60 K arrays. Each array contained 40 probes targeting each of the 1′347 miRNA. Data preprocessing included quantile normalization using robust multi-array average (RMA) algorithm. Prognostic and predictive miRNA expression profiles were identified by Spearman's rank correlation test (percentage tumor shrinkage) or log-rank testing (for time-to-event endpoints). Results: Data preprocessing kept 49 patients and 424 miRNA for further analysis. Ten miRNA's were significantly associated with OS, with hsa-miR-29a being the strongest prognostic marker (HR = 6.44, 95%-CI 2.39-17.33). Patients with high has-miR-29a expression had a significantly lower survival at 10 months compared to patients with a low expression (54% versus 83%). Six out of the 10 miRNA's (hsa-miRN-29a, hsa-miR-542-5p, hsa-miR-502-3p, hsa-miR-376a, hsa-miR-500a, hsa-miR-424) were insensitive to perturbations according to jackknife cross-validation on their HR for OS. The respective principal component analysis (PCA) defined a meta-miRNA signature including the same 6 miRNA's, resulting in a HR of 0.66 (95%-CI 0.53-0.82). Conclusion Cell-free circulating miRNA-profiling successfully identified a highly prognostic 6-gene signature in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC. Circulating miRNA profiling should further be validated in external cohorts for the selection and monitoring of systemic treatment in patients with advanced NSCLC.
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    Christian M Schürch, Carsten Riether, Adrian F Ochsenbein
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    ABSTRACT: Interferons not only exert a fundamental role during inflammation and immune responses but also modulate the activity of hematopoietic stem cells during homeostatic and demand-adapted hematopoiesis. Identical mechanisms regulate the homeostasis and proliferation of leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Understanding these mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches against leukemia.
    OncoImmunology 06/2013; 2(6):e24572. DOI:10.4161/onci.24572 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasia arising from the oncogenic break point cluster region/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 translocation in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), resulting in a leukemia stem cell (LSC). Curing CML depends on the eradication of LSCs. Unfortunately, LSCs are resistant to current treatment strategies. The host's immune system is thought to contribute to disease control, and several immunotherapy strategies are under investigation. However, the interaction of the immune system with LSCs is poorly defined. In the present study, we use a murine CML model to show that LSCs express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and co-stimulatory molecules and are recognized and killed by leukemia-specific CD8(+) effector CTLs in vitro. In contrast, therapeutic infusions of effector CTLs into CML mice in vivo failed to eradicate LSCs but, paradoxically, increased LSC numbers. LSC proliferation and differentiation was induced by CTL-secreted IFN-γ. Effector CTLs were only able to eliminate LSCs in a situation with minimal leukemia load where CTL-secreted IFN-γ levels were low. In addition, IFN-γ increased proliferation and colony formation of CD34(+) stem/progenitor cells from CML patients in vitro. Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which the immune system contributes to leukemia progression and may be important to improve T cell-based immunotherapy against leukemia.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 02/2013; 210(3). DOI:10.1084/jem.20121229 · 13.91 Impact Factor
  • Carsten Riether, Christian Schuerch, Adrian F. Ochsenbein
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    ABSTRACT: The immune system is able to specifically target antigen-expressing cancer cells. The promise of immunotherapy was to eliminate cancer cells without harming normal tissue and, therefore, with no or very few side effects. Immunotherapy approaches have, for several decades, been tested against several tumours, most often against malignant melanoma. However, although detectable immune responses have regularly been induced, the clinical outcome has often been disappointing. The development of molecular methods and an improved understanding of tumour immunosurveillance led to novel immunotherapy approaches in the last few years. First randomised phase III trials proved that immunotherapy can prolong survival of patients with metastatic melanoma or prostate cancer. The development in the field is very rapid and various molecules (mainly monoclonal antibodies) that activate the immune system are currently being tested in clinical trials and will possibly change our treatment of cancer. The ultimate goal of any cancer therapy and also immunotherapy is to cure cancer. However, this depends on the elimination of the disease originating cancer stem cells. Unfortunately, cancer stem cells seem resistant to most available treatment options. Recent developments in immunotherapy may allow targeting these cancer stem cells specifically in the future. In this review, we summarise the current state of immunotherapy in clinical routine and the expected developments in the near future.
    Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift 01/2013; 143. DOI:10.4414/smw.2013.13734 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    Christian M Schürch, Carsten Riether, Adrian F Ochsenbein
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    ABSTRACT: Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to "malignant" DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias.
    Frontiers in Immunology 01/2013; 4:496. DOI:10.3389/fimmu.2013.00496
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    Carsten Riether, Christian Schürch, Adrian F Ochsenbein
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    ABSTRACT: CD27 signaling can either improve T-cell function or lead to T-cell dysfunction, depending on the duration and conditions of receptor ligation. Recent studies have shown that modulating the CD70-CD27 interaction is an attractive strategy to treat solid tumors and also to directly target leukemia stem cells.
    OncoImmunology 12/2012; 1(9):1604-1606. DOI:10.4161/onci.21425 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Trimodal therapy results in long term survival in a small fraction of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, particularly in patients having epithelial histology, R0-resection and no nodal involvement. This study analyses the outcome after trimodal therapy including extrapleural pneumonectomy. From 2000 to 2005 41 patients with histologically verified malignant pleural mesothelioma were included. Diagnosis and nodal status were confirmed by surgery. 21 patients (51%) underwent trimodal therapy with 655 days (63-2,567 days) of median follow-up. Postoperative complications, mortality, long term survival and recurrence rates were analysed retrospectively. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisted of a combination of platinum based agents (n = 19) with gemcitabine (n = 15) or pemetrexed (n = 4). Extrapleural pneumonectomy was the standard procedure for surgery. 13 patients (62%) had postoperative complications. 16 patients (76%) received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. There was a 30-day mortality of 4.8% in the trimodal group. Survival rates in the trimodal group were 71% after one, 28% after two and 10% after five years. There were no significant differences regarding age, tumour stage, cell type or lymph node involvement. Tumour recurrence occurred after one and two years in 44% and in 83% respectively. The majority of patients considered for surgical resection of malignant pleural mesothelioma have regionally advanced disease. In those receiving trimodal therapy long term survival is achieved only in a minority of patients. In view of the time consuming and intensive treatment it should be offered only in carefully selected patients as new surgical approaches such as pleurectomy/decortication have shown high efficacy rates regarding patients' survival.
    Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift 10/2012; 142. DOI:10.4414/smw.2012.13686 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: This phase II trial aimed to evaluate feasibility and efficacy of a first-line combination of targeted therapies for advanced non-squamous NSCLC: bevacizumab (B) and erlotinib (E), followed by platinum-based CT at disease progression (PD). METHODS: 103 patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC were treated with B (15mg/kg day 1 of each 21-day cycle) and E (150mg daily) until PD or unacceptable toxicity. Upon PD patients received 6 cycles of CT (cisplatin/carboplatin and gemcitabine). The primary endpoint was disease stabilization rate (DSR) after 12 weeks of BE treatment. RESULTS: 101 patients were evaluable. Under BE, DSR at week 12 was 54.5%. 73 patients had at least stable disease (SD), including 1 complete remission and 17 partial responses (PR). No unexpected toxicities were observed. Median time to progression (TTP) under BE was 4.1 months. 62 patients started CT; 35 received at least 4 cycles (6 PR, 32 SD). At a median follow-up of 36 months, median overall survival (OS) was 14.1 months. CONCLUSIONS: First-line BE treatment followed by a fixed CT regimen at PD is feasible with acceptable toxicity and activity. In a non-squamous NSCLC population unselected for EGFR status, we found OS rates similar to standard CT.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 09/2012; DOI:10.1016/j.lungcan.2012.08.017 · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Melanoma is characterized by a high frequency of BRAF mutations. It is unknown if the BRAF mutation status has any predictive value for therapeutic approaches such as angiogenesis inhibition. We used 2 methods to analyze the BRAF mutation status in 52 of 62 melanoma patients. Method 1 (mutation-specific real-time PCR) specifically detects the most frequent BRAF mutations, V600E and V600K. Method 2 (denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis and direct sequencing) identifies any mutations affecting exons 11 and 15. Eighteen BRAF mutations and 15 wild-type mutations were identified with both methods. One tumor had a double mutation (GAA) in codon 600. Results of 3 samples were discrepant. Additional mutations (V600M, K601E) were detected using method 2. Sixteen DNA samples were analyzable with either method 1 or method 2. There was a significant association between BRAF V600E mutation and survival. Standardized tissue fixation protocols are needed to optimize BRAF mutation analysis in melanoma. For melanoma treatment decisions, the availability of a fast and reliable BRAF V600E screening method may be sufficient. If other BRAF mutations in exons 11 and 15 are found to be of predictive value, a combination of the 2 methods would be useful.
    Case Reports in Oncology 06/2012; 5(2):280-9. DOI:10.1159/000339300

Publication Stats

5k Citations
721.04 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2015
    • Inselspital, Universitätsspital Bern
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Berna, Bern, Switzerland
  • 2003–2014
    • Universität Bern
      • Department of Clinical Research
      Berna, Bern, Switzerland
  • 2010
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2005
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      • Division of Clinical Research
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 1998–2000
    • University of Zurich
      • Institut für Experimentelle Immunologie
      Zürich, ZH, Switzerland
  • 1999
    • University Hospital Zürich
      Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland