Fanny Coron

University of Burgundy, Dijon, Bourgogne, France

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Publications (7)12.42 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fanconi anaemia (FA) is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and predisposition to malignancy. In a minority of cases, FA results from biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations that are associated with early-onset leukaemia and solid tumours. Here, we describe the clinical and molecular features of a remarkable family presenting with multiple primary colorectal cancers (CRCs) without detectable mutations in genes involved in the Mendelian predisposition to CRCs. We unexpectedly identified, despite the absence of clinical cardinal features of FA, a biallelic mutation of the FANCD1/BRCA2 corresponding to a frameshift alteration (c.1845_1846delCT, p.Asn615Lysfs*6) and a missense mutation (c.7802A>G, p.Tyr2601Cys). The diagnosis of FA was confirmed by the chromosomal analysis of lymphocytes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that the c.7802A>G BRCA2 variation was in fact a splicing mutation that creates an aberrant splicing donor site and results partly into an aberrant transcript encoding a truncated protein (p.Tyr2601Trpfs*46). The atypical FA phenotype observed within this family was probably explained by the residual amount of BRCA2 with the point mutation c.7802A>G in the patients harbouring the biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations. Although this report is based in a single family, it suggests that CRCs may be part of the tumour spectrum associated with FANCD1/BRCA2 biallelic mutations and that the presence of such mutations should be considered in families with CRCs, even in the absence of cardinal features of FA.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 4 December 2013; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.278.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 12/2013; · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder with manifestations mainly involving the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. The phenotypic variability observed in MFS makes genetic counselling difficult. Prenatal diagnosis (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis are technically feasible when a causal mutation is identified, but both raise many ethical questions in this condition. Little is known about opinions and practices in such reproductive issues in MFS. The goal of this study was to report on patients' points of view and geneticists' standard practices. METHODS: Two different questionnaires were produced. RESULTS: Fifty geneticists filled in the questionnaire. Twenty-two per cent thought that PND was acceptable, 72% debatable and 6% not acceptable. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis was more often reported acceptable (34% of answers). Results varied according to the physician's experience with the disease. Fifty-four answers were collected for patients' questionnaires. Most of them (74%) were favourable to the development of prenatal testing, and believed that the choice should be given to parents. However, only a minority would opt for prenatal diagnosis for themselves. CONCLUSION: This study showed that the majority of patients were in favour of PND and that opinions among practitioners varied widely, but that overall, practitioners favoured a systematic multidisciplinary evaluation of the couple's request. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Prenatal Diagnosis 11/2012; · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In all countries of the European Union, oral information must be given to the patient. Written information is generally optional, but physicians are tending more and more to send a copy of the clinical report to the patient. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact on patients of sending them written information after a clinical consultation in a French genetics department. During a period of three months, two geneticists and one genetic counselor offered to send each patient a copy of the letter sent to their general practitioners. A questionnaire was sent with this copy. Three hundred and seventy-five patients were seen and 64% of the questionnaires were sent back. Of these, 99% showed that this practice was considered a good idea, and 80% reported that the letter reflected the clinical aspects well. Seventy-two percent thought that receiving this letter improved their understanding of the clinical situation. In general, patients found the words understandable (83%), too medical (20%) or even shocking (3%). Sixty-three percent said that they would have asked their general practitioner to give them the letter. Their main motivation for wanting a copy of this letter was to remember the information in the future, to have the information to pass on to other physicians involved in their health in the future, or to have information concerning the family. Finally, 58% would have preferred a letter sent specifically to them rather than a copy, and suggestions for the contents of such a letter should be further studied.
    European journal of medical genetics 03/2011; 54(3):277-80. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Since their introduction, genetic tests have been carefully considered, with special attention to the release of information about the test and test results, the confidentiality of genetic information, the request and its motivation, and the psychological impact of the test. Careful consideration is needed when family members at risk are asymptomatic children or adolescents. Cautious reflection is warranted on whether and under which conditions genetic testing should be performed. Here, we report on the results of a survey conducted in France among 50 geneticists questioned on their opinions and practices concerning presymptomatic testing in three groups of diseases: those for which a medical benefit exists during childhood (e.g., retinoblastoma), diseases with onset during childhood for which there are no immediate medical consequences (e.g., type II/III spinal muscular atrophy), and those with onset during adulthood for which there is no medical benefit during childhood (e.g., Huntington disease). Guidelines are proposed: presymptomatic testing should not be performed in a minor without individual and direct information, all requests for presymptomatic genetic testing concerning a disease with onset in adulthood should be postponed, and all presymptomatic test requests for a minor should be addressed to a multidisciplinary team.
    Archives de Pédiatrie 05/2010; 17(7):1000-7. · 0.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interstitial deletions involving the 15q21.1 band are very rare. Only 4 of these cases have been studied using molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to confirm the deletion of the whole FBN1 gene. The presence of clinical features of the Marfan syndrome (MFS) spectrum associated with mental retardation has been described in only 2/4 patients. Here we report on a 16-year-old female referred for suspicion of MFS (positive thumb and wrist sign, scoliosis, joint hyperlaxity, high-arched palate with dental crowding, dysmorphism, mitral insufficiency with dystrophic valve, striae). She had therefore 3 minor criteria according to the Ghent nosology. She also had speech disabilities but could follow normal school training. Direct sequencing of the FBN1, TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes was negative. MLPA revealed a genomic deletion of the whole FBN1 gene, confirmed by loss of heterozygosity of maternal alleles for several microsatellite markers surrounding the FBN1 gene. The deletion was confirmed by FISH using a FBN1 probe and was not found in the parents. Array-CGH permitted to define a 2.97 Mb deletion, which was the smallest 15q microdeletion including FBN1. Contrary to the other published observations, our proband does not exhibit mental retardation, but neuropsychological evaluations revealed an attention deficit as well as a deficit in information-processing speed. Haploinsufficiency of FBN1 is likely to contribute to the presence of MFS features. However, attenuated features could be explained because disturbances of TGF-beta signalling associated with FBN1 mutations do not exert full phenotypic effect through simple haploinsufficiency. Phenotypic variability in other patients with interstitial deletions including 15q21.1 band may reflect differences in deletion size and/or cys/trans modifying factors.
    European journal of medical genetics 01/2010; 53(4):208-12. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since their introduction, genetic tests have been carefully considered, with special attention to the release of information about the test and test results, the confidentiality of genetic information, the request and its motivation, and the psychological impact of the test. Careful consideration is needed when family members at risk are asymptomatic children or adolescents. Cautious reflection is warranted on whether and under which conditions genetic testing should be performed. Here, we report on the results of a survey conducted in France among 50 geneticists questioned on their opinions and practices concerning presymptomatic testing in three groups of diseases: those for which a medical benefit exists during childhood (e.g., retinoblastoma), diseases with onset during childhood for which there are no immediate medical consequences (e.g., type II/III spinal muscular atrophy), and those with onset during adulthood for which there is no medical benefit during childhood (e.g., Huntington disease). Guidelines are proposed: presymptomatic testing should not be performed in a minor without individual and direct information, all requests for presymptomatic genetic testing concerning a disease with onset in adulthood should be postponed, and all presymptomatic test requests for a minor should be addressed to a multidisciplinary team.
    Archives De Pediatrie - ARCHIVES PEDIATRIE. 01/2010; 17(7):1000-1007.
  • Prenatal Diagnosis 06/2009; 29(9):892-4. · 2.68 Impact Factor