Edwina Rudy

King Edward VIII Hospital, Port Natal, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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Publications (5)4.99 Total impact

  • Source
    Carol Bower · Aandra Ryan · Edwina Rudy · Margaret Miller
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    ABSTRACT: To report on trends in neural tube defects in Western Australia, in relation to folate promotion, periconceptional use of folic acid supplements and food fortification with folate. Data on neural tube defects from the Western Australian Birth Defects Registry. A 30% fall in neural tube defects was documented from 1996 to 2000. The sustained fall in neural tube defects is thought to be due to increased periconceptional folate intake in response to health promotion campaigns and fortification of selected foods. There is room for further improvement.
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 05/2002; 26(2):150-1. · 1.90 Impact Factor
  • Carol Bower · Aandra Ryan · Edwina Rudy · Margaret Miller
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:To report on trends in neural tube defects in Western Australia, in relation to folate promotion, periconceptional use of folic acid supplements and food fortification with folate. Methods:Data on neural tube defects from the Western Australian Birth Defects Registry. Results:A 30% fall in neural tube defects was documented from 1996 to 2000. Conclusions and implications:The sustained fall in neural tube defects is thought to be due to increased periconceptional folate intake in response to health promotion campaigns and fortification of selected foods. There is room for further improvement.
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 03/2002; 26(2):150 - 151. DOI:10.1111/j.1467-842X.2002.tb00908.x · 1.90 Impact Factor
  • Carol Bower · Aandra Ryan · Edwina Rudy
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    ABSTRACT: When evaluating preventive programs such as folate promotion and rubella vaccination, it is critically important to include terminations of pregnancy for neural tube defects and congenital rubella syndrome. Data from birth defects registries are often used for this purpose. The Western Australian Birth Defects Registry ascertains cases of birth defects in livebirths, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal abnormality, using multiple sources of ascertainment. Data on terminations of pregnancy for fetal abnormality from the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Data System 1980-1997 (not previously available to the Registry) were used to estimate the completeness of ascertainment of such cases by the Registry. Ascertainment-adjusted prevalences were calculated using capture-recapture methods. A total of 702 terminations with birth defects were identified among hospital discharges, most of which were already known to the Registry (87.9%). Of the 85 new cases, seven had a neural tube defect, 23 had a chromosomal defect, and 12 had confirmed maternal rubella infection during pregnancy. The ascertainment-adjusted prevalence was not importantly [corrected] different for birth defects overall or for these individual conditions, although the 95% confidence intervals for all birth defects, and for all chromosomal defects, did not include the prevalence based on registered cases only. The Western Australian Birth Defects Registry ascertains a high proportion of pregnancies terminated for fetal abnormality, and should therefore be a reliable source of data with which to assist in monitoring the effectiveness of preventive programs.
    Teratology 01/2001; 63(1):23-5. DOI:10.1002/1096-9926(200101)63:1<23::AID-TERA1004>3.0.CO;2-S
  • C Bower · D Silva · T R Henderson · A Ryan · E Rudy
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    ABSTRACT: The Western Australian (WA) Birth Defects Registry aims for complete ascertainment of birth defects in WA, but the proportions of birth defects in rural areas and in Aboriginal children are lower than in metropolitan and non-Aboriginal children. The effect on ascertainment of adding data from the Rural Paediatric Service (RPS) was investigated. A file of all cases of birth defects for children born 1980-1997 and recorded on the RPS database was linked to the Registry. The addition of this new data source had little effect on the overall prevalence of birth defects (an increase from 5.38 to 5.41%). There was a slightly greater effect on the prevalence of birth defects in rural residents (4.67%-4.76%) and Aboriginal children (4.55-4.78%), although the prevalence for each of these groups is still less than for metropolitan residents and non-Aboriginal infants, respectively. All major categories of birth defects were represented in the new cases and, in general, their addition made little difference to the prevalence of each category. The exception was fetal alcohol syndrome, which increased from 0.13 per 1000 to 0.18 per 1000 once the 21 new cases from the RPS were added. Complete ascertainment of birth defects is important in developing and evaluating preventive programs, and in investigating clusters of birth defects.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2001; 36(6):574-6. DOI:10.1046/j.1440-1754.2000.00575.x · 1.19 Impact Factor
  • Carol Bower · Robin Forbes · Aandra Ryan · Edwina Rudy
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    ABSTRACT: A series of studies was undertaken in 1989 to validate the data held by the Western Australian Congenital Malformations Registry. Comparison with hospital discharge data identified 1585 children six years of age or younger with malformations discharged from hospitals in Western Australia in 1986, 226 of whom were not already recorded on the Congenital Malformations Register. When the records of a special register for cleft lip and palate were examined, all cases of facial cleft known to the special register were also recorded on the Malformations Register. Comparison of the Western Australian data for major groups of malformations with data from the South Australian Birth Defects Register raised the possibility of under ascertainment in Western Australia of cases of congenital heart disease. Multiple sources of ascertainment and evaluation of the ways in which such sources are tapped are important factors in striving for complete and accurate information on congenital malformations for research and public health purposes.
    Community health studies 02/1990; 14(3):274-8. DOI:10.1111/j.1753-6405.1990.tb00627.x