Eda Utine

Hacettepe University, Engüri, Ankara, Turkey

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Publications (19)31.39 Total impact

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    Clinical dysmorphology. 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiomyopathy (CMP) in childhood is an etiologically heterogeneous group of cardiac disease, including many genetic, metabolic, neuromuscular and environmental causes. The goal of this study is to determine the underlying causes and clinical characteristics of children presenting with CMP to a tertiary medical center in Turkey. We analyzed the data of 109 patients retrospectively, who presented with CMP as an initial feature, and without a specific diagnosis, between May 2007 and May 2012. Patients who already developed CMP during the course of a diagnosed disease were excluded from the study. Among 109 patients, 57 were male, and 52 were female. Most of the patients were symptomatic (n = 59) in the first year of life (54.1%). The patients were subdivided into three groups, as dilated CMP (n = 69, 63.3%), hypertrophic CMP (n = 32, 9.4%), and restrictive CMP (n = 8, 7.3%). The etiology remained unknown in 68.8% of all cases. Inborn errors of metabolism (n = 16) and cardiac diseases (n = 10) comprised the main etiological diagnosis, while dysmorphic syndromes (n = 4), immunological diseases (n = 2), neuromuscular diseases (n = 2) were responsible from minority of cases. Cardiac transplantation was possible for 4.6% of patients (n = 5), whereas 29.4% of all patients died during a median of 13-month follow-up. In the era of advanced molecular genetic testing, approach to CMP in childhood is still challenging, and 57–68% patients remain idiopathic. The reported success rate of finding an etiology of CMP is around 30% in literature, and 31.2% in this group. This study highlights the importance of detailed clinical evaluation as a first-step.
    Neuromuscular Disorders 10/2014; 24(s 9–10):801. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebrofaciothoracic dysplasia (CFT) (OMIM #213980) is a multiple congenital anomaly and intellectual disability syndrome involving the cranium, face, and thorax. The characteristic features are cranial involvement with macrocrania at birth, brachycephaly, various CT/MRI findings including hypoplasia of corpus callosum, enlargement of septum pellicidum, and diffuse hypodensity of the grey matter, flat face, hypertelorism, cleft lip and cleft palate, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, short neck, and multiple costal and vertebral anomalies. The underlying genetic defect remains unknown. Using combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous nonsense founder mutation, p.Arg87Ter (c.259 C>T), in the human transmembrane and coiled-coil domains protein 1 (TMCO1) in four out of five families of Turkish origin. The entire critical region on chromosome 1q24 containing TMCO1 was excluded in the fifth family with characteristic findings of CFT providing evidence for genetic heterogeneity of CFT spectrum. Another founder TMCO1 mutation has recently been reported to cause a unique genetic condition, TMCO1-defect syndrome (OMIM #614132). TMCO1-defect syndrome shares many features with CFT. This study supports the fact that "TMCO1-defect syndrome," initially thought to represent a distinct disorder, indeed belongs to the genetically heterogeneous CFT dysplasia spectrum. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 11/2013; 164(2). · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a rare primordial dwarfism that is similar to Seckel syndrome. Seckel syndrome is known to be associated with various hematological abnormalities; however, hematological findings in MOPD II patients have not been previously reported. The present study aimed to describe the hematological findings in a series of eight patients with MOPD II from a single center. The study included eight patients with MOPD II that were analyzed via molecular testing, and physical and laboratory examinations. Molecular testing showed that seven of the eight patients had pericentrin (PCNT) gene mutations. Hematological evaluation showed that 7 (87.5%) patients had thrombocytosis, 6 (75%) had leukocytosis, 5 (62.5%) had both leukocytosis and thrombocytosis, and 2 (25%) had anemia. We report leukocytosis and thrombocytosis as a common hematologic abnormality in patients with MOPD II. The present findings may improve our understanding of the potential function of the PCNT gene in hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 09/2013; · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: A microdeletion in the chromosome 22q11.2 (DiGeorge or velocardiofacial syndrome) is the most common human deletion syndrome. Patients with 22q11.2 deletion may have a wide range of ocular findings but severe ocular involvement is uncommon. Here, we describe a 2-year-old boy who had growth retardation, developmental delay, right renal agenesis, ventricular septal defect and severe bilateral ocular anomalies. Materials and methods: The systemic and ocular findings and cranial magnetic resonance imaging study results were reviewed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was performed on his peripheral blood. Results: The patient presented with the oculodigital sign. On examination, he had severe right microphthalmia with no light perception and his left eye could not fix and follow. The left eye had anterior segment dysgenesis, mild sclerocornea, corneal staphyloma and congenital aphakia. Systemic findings included growth deficiency, microcephaly, micrognathia, ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect and right renal agenesis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of this patient was significant for a heterozygous deletion covering DiGeorge critical region 2 and spanning a 250 kb region in the 22q11.2 locus. Conclusion: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome may be associated with severe bilateral ocular malformations including microphthalmia, sclerocornea, corneal staphyloma, anterior segment dysgenesis and congenital aphakia. Corneal staphyloma might have resulted from the oculodigital phenomenon or increased intraocular pressure.
    Ophthalmic Genetics 07/2013; · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anterior segment dysgenesis comprises a spectrum of malformations arising from faulty neural crest cell migration. We report a newborn boy with partial trisomy 16q and partial monosomy 3p who presented with anterior segment dysgenesis with iris hypoplasia on the right and glaucoma on the left in association with systemic anomalies. The anterior segment dysgenesis features observed in this case have not been previously associated with partial trisomy 16q or partial monosomy 3p. Our findings support the hypothesis that an additional anterior segment dysgenesis gene may reside on chromosome 3p or 16q.
    Journal of AAPOS: the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus 10/2012; 16(5):473-5. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report an infant diagnosed with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II at age 8 months, who experienced cerebrovascular morbidities related to this entity. Molecular analysis identified c.2609+1 G>A, intron 14, homozygous splice site mutation in the pericentrin gene. At age 18 months, she developed recurrent strokes and hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography showed abnormal gyral pattern, cortical acute infarcts, bilateral stenosis of the internal carotid arteries and reduced flow on the cerebral arteries, consistent with moyamoya disease. In Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II, life expectancy is reduced because of high risk of stroke secondary to cerebral vascular anomalies (aneurysms, moyamoya disease). Periodic screening for vascular events is recommended in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II every 12-18 months following diagnosis. Our patient was medically managed with low molecular weight heparin followed with aspirin prophylaxis, in addition to carbamazepine and physical rehabilitation. Conclusion: We report an infant with moyamoya disease and recurrent stroke presenting 10 months after diagnosis (at age 18 months), and discuss the outcome of nonsurgical medical management. The presented case is the second youngest case developing stroke and moyamoya disease.
    European Journal of Pediatrics 04/2012; 171(10):1567-71. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 09/2011; 9(1). · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome occurs sporadically due to deletion of chromosome 11p13. A variety of other abnormalities involving different systems have been reported in patients with WAGR syndrome. We report on a patient with WAGR syndrome with accompanying tetralogy of Fallot and hydrocephalus.
    Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 04/2011; 33(4):e174–e175. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) due to Echinococcus granulosus is as high as 2000-2500 patients per year in Turkey. Whether genetic characteristics of the Turkish population cause a tendency to the disease is currently unknown. We aimed at studying the role of TAP gene polymorphisms in Turkish children with cystic echinococcosis. For an overview of allelic distribution of TAP1 and TAP2 genes, genotypes of 85 patients with CE and 100 controls were studied. To determine the genotype-phenotype correlation, 81 of the patients whose clinical data were available were analyzed. For TAP1-637, Asp/Gly heterozygosity was significantly more prevalent in CE patients than in controls (20 vs. 4%, odds ratio 6.0), while Gly/Gly homozygosity was less frequent (5 vs. 14%). For TAP2-379, Ile/Val heterozygosity was significantly more prevalent in CE patients than in controls (14 vs. 1%, odds ratio 16.27), while Ile/Ile homozygosity was less frequent (13 vs. 25%). TAP1-637 and TAP2-379 polymorphisms may have a role in causing genetic tendency for CE in children. The data may reflect the genetic properties of the Turkish population or may reveal the minor role of TAP gene polymorphisms in CE.
    Parasitology International 02/2010; 59(2):283-5. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genomic imbalances constitute a major cause of congenital and developmental abnormalities. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by various de novo mutations in the facilitated human glucose transporter 1 gene (1p34.2) and patients with this syndrome have been diagnosed with hypoglycorrhachia, mental and developmental delay, microcephaly and seizures. Furthermore, 1q terminal deletions have been submitted in the recent reports and the absence of corpus callosum has been related to the deletion between C1orf100 and C1orf121 in 1q44. This study reports on a sibling pair with developmental delay, mental retardation, microcephaly, hypotonia, epilepsy, facial dysmorphism, ataxia and impaired speech. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1 in both patients. FISH and MCB analysis showed two interstitial deletions at 1p34.2 and 1q44. SNP array and array-CGH analysis also determined the sizes of deletions detailed. The deleted region on 1p34.2 encompasses 33 genes, among which is GLUT1 gene (SLC2A1). However, the deleted region on 1q44 includes 59 genes and distal-proximal breakpoints were located in the ZNF672 gene and SMYD3 gene, respectively. Haploinsufficiency of GLUT1 leads to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, consistent with the phenotype in patients of this study. Conversely, in the deleted region on 1q44, none of the genes are related to findings in these patients. Additionally, the results confirm previous reports on that corpus callosal development may depend on the critical gene(s) lying in 1q44 proximal to the SMYD3 gene.
    Molecular Cytogenetics 01/2010; 3(1):10. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Because of low copy repeats (LCRs) and common inversion polymorphisms, the human chromosome 8p is prone to a number of recurrent rearrangements. Each of these rearrangements is associated with several phenotypic features. We report on a patient with various clinical malformations and developmental delay in connection with an inverted duplication event, involving chromosome 8p. Chromosome analysis, multicolor banding analysis (MCB), extensive fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and microsatellite analysis were performed. The karyotype was characterized in detail by multicolor banding (MCB), subtelomeric and centromere-near probes as 46,XY,dup(8)(pter->p23.3::p12->p23.3::p23.3->qter). Additionally, microsatellite analysis revealed the paternal origin of the duplication and gave hints for a mitotic recombination involving about 6 MB in 8p23.3. A comprehensive analysis of the derivative chromosome 8 suggested a previously unreported mechanism of formation, which included an early mitotic aberration leading to maternal isodisomy, followed by an inverted duplication of the 8p12p23.3 region.
    Molecular Cytogenetics 07/2009; 2:14. · 2.66 Impact Factor
    This article is viewable in ResearchGate's enriched format
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is characterized by clubbing, periosteal new bone formation and polyarthritis. The pathogenesis of clubbing involves an increased expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from the digitally lodged platelet clumps, which bypass the pulmonary capillary network as a result of various systemic disorders. Intrathoracic neoplasms are rare causes of HOA in children. We report here a 14-year-old boy with digital clubbing, who eventually received the diagnosis of intrathoracic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and HOA. Eight cases previously reported with these two diagnoses are reviewed to emphasize the prognostic significance of HOA in childhood HL. CONCLUSION: Given the pathogenesis of clubbing and the prognostic significance of HOA, intrathoracic disease should be considered when HOA is detected in a child with a known or suspected malignant disease, and the occurrence of HOA during follow-up should alert the physicians for possible recurrence of the neoplastic disease or intrathoracic involvement.
    European Journal of Pediatrics 05/2008; 167(4):419-23. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 10(6/12)-year-old boy was referred to the genetics department because of mental retardation and dysmorphic findings including microcephaly, flat face, down-slanting palpebral fissures, strabismus, prominent ears, bulbous nasal tip, down-turned corners of the mouth, narrow palate, clinodactyly of the fifth fingers and generalised eczema. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 47,XY,+mar of paternal origin. Multicolour FISH showed the marker chromosome to be derived from chromosome 15. For further elucidation of the phenotype, array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) was performed, which revealed dup(5)(q35.2qter) and del(1)(p36.3). Parental FISH analysis revealed that the translocation occurred de novo. Despite the presence of a clinical phenotype along with a microscopically visible chromosomal aberration, a complex cryptic cytogenetic abnormality was causative for the phenotype of the patient. Elucidation of this complex aberration required combination of the whole cytogenetic toolbox.
    European Journal of Medical Genetics 04/2008; 51(4):343-50. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a further two patients with cerebro-facio-thoracic dysplasia, a rare autosomal recessive condition with thoracic costovertebral dysplasia, developmental delay and characteristic facial features. One of our patients has the additional features of large, bilateral colobomas of the optic nerve, ptosis, small conical teeth and severe left-sided talipes. He also has hypermobile joints, especially in his hands and anterior subluxation of the shoulders. The second patient has hypodensity of the grey matter on magnetic resonance imaging, which is the second report of this finding in cerebro-facio-thoracic dysplasia. In addition, he has hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. These cases illustrate the expanding phenotype of this condition, and support the hypothesis that this is an autosomal recessive condition.
    Clinical Dysmorphology 05/2007; 16(2):121-5. · 0.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. Since the identification of the responsible gene (FMR1) and its protein (FMRP), there has been enormous progress in both clinical and pathogenetic research on the neurobehavioural aspects of the condition. However, studies regarding other medical problems anticipated in individuals with FXS are limited. A multidisciplinary study evaluating various causes of morbidity in the same group has not been published yet. Twenty-four boys with FXS full mutation were recruited out of a larger group of 103 diagnosed in one centre over the past 10 years. Ear nose and throat, eye and cardiac examinations were performed in addition to routine cognitive, behavioural, neurological and speech and language assessments. The average IQ score was 49.8 +/- 20 (range 25-90). There were four patients (18%) with IQ above 70. Using DSM-IV, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was diagnosed in five boys out of 22 examined (23%), while 32% were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder. The seizure frequency was 17%. A psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in six out of eight boys with electroencephalogram abnormalities (75%). Minimal conductive hearing loss was found in five (5/22) patients. There was significant delay in both expressive and receptive language skills. Ocular findings were refractive errors (13%) and strabismus (4.4%). Mitral valve prolapsus (MVP) was observed in 3/22 (13.7%) patients and aortic annulus dilatation was present in 2/22 (9%) patients. Frequency of psychiatric diagnoses made with DSM-IV were in parallel to those reported in the literature. Comorbidity of seizures and psychiatric disorders was noteworthy. The percentage of 'high-functioning' full mutation males supports the previous observations. Ear nose and throat and eye examination revealed remarkably lower prevalence of abnormal findings than reported. MVP was slightly less frequent compared with the single study in the literature. Age at the time of examination had an effect on the outcome of cardiac evaluation. These findings will guide us in future management of the group of patients followed in our institution. The protocol applied provides an applicable outline for multidisciplinary institutional settings dealing with individuals with FXS.
    Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 03/2007; 51(Pt 2):151-61. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on a fetus with a large deletion of the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 13, (del(13)(q14 --> qter)) congenital anomalies of the urinary system, lungs and extremities, and Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM). Although DWM has been associated with many chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes, its relation to the distal 13q has been demonstrated recently. In 2002, McCormack et al., described two patients with deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 who had multiple congenital abnormalities along with holoprosencephaly (HPE) and DWM. The phenotypic features and autopsy findings of a fetus with "distal 13q deletion syndrome" at 22 weeks gestation are discussed and comparison with the previous two cases is made. The findings support the previous hypothesis suggesting that haploinsufficiency at a locus within 13q22-33 due to microdeletions may be responsible for isolated DWM in some of the patients. Detailed examination of 13q (13q22-33) by means of conventional and molecular cytogenetic methods is necessary in cases with DWM.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 07/2005; 136(3):265-8. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a 13-year-old girl with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) caused by a known transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2) gene mutation, who developed aortic root dilatation and saccular aneurysm of the internal carotid artery. LDS is a rare, autosomal dominant aortic aneurysm syndrome with multisystem involvement. The disease is typically characterized by the triad of arterial tortuosity and aneurysms, hypertelorism, and bifid uvula/cleft palate. The characteristic LDS symptoms observed in the reported case included craniofacial dysmorphism (hypertelorism, cleft palate, blue sclerae, malar hypoplasia, retrognathia), skeletal deformities (scoliosis, talipes equinovarus, pectus deformity, arachnodactyly), congenital heart defects (patent ductus arteriosus, PDA), and arterial tortuosity and aneurysms. Molecular genetic testing revealed a heterozygous mutation (c.1610 G>C, p.R528C) in the serine-threonine kinase domain of the TGFBR2 gene. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography showed aortic dilatation, tortuosity of bilateral supraaortic arteries, and saccular aneurysm on the right cervical internal carotid artery. LDS resembles Marfan-related disorders (Marfan, Shprintzen-Goldberg and vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome), but arterial tortuosity and aneurysms are characteristic for LDS, so a timely diagnosis of LDS is important for early diagnosis and intervention of aneurysms to prevent vascular events. Here, we describe a LDS patient who presented with arterial tortuosity and saccular aneurysm.
    The Turkish journal of pediatrics 54(2):198-202. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Larsen syndrome is characterized by multiple joint dislocations, associated with a typical facial appearance and frequently other abnormalities. Both dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance have been reported. A lethal form of Larsen syndrome (Larsen-like syndrome) has been described as a combination of the Larsen phenotype and pulmonary hypoplasia. In this report, we present a 24-week-old female fetus with a possible prenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dysplasia in whom postmortem examination revealed lethal type Larsen-like syndrome associated with bifid tongue, severe micrognathia and non-immune hydrops fetalis. These findings have not been reported previously in the lethal type Larsen syndrome.
    The Turkish journal of pediatrics 50(4):395-9. · 0.56 Impact Factor