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Publications (2)3.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The paucity of long-term studies makes it difficult to evaluate the sustained abstinence over time of smokers who quit. The objective of the present study was to determine to what extent the results of tobacco cessation interventions are maintained after 5 years. This was a longitudinal prospective study of 502 smokers. The design was quasi-experimental given that therapy was allocated according to the level of the patients' nicotine dependence: routine minimum intervention for smokers with mild addiction and those not in the preparation stage, and nicotine replacement therapy for patients with moderate-to-high dependence and/or a high level of tobacco consumption. Of the 267 patients followed for 5 years, 29.6% quit and were still abstinent at 1 year, and 18.0% remained abstinent after 5 years. Of those who had managed to stop smoking within 2 months of starting the intervention, 47.4% were still abstinent on follow-up at 5 years while 88.1% of those who failed to quit within 2 months were still smoking 5 years later. The results observed during the action stage could be of use in reorienting the treatment approach, and a planned schedule of follow-up contacts could help patients maintain the abstinence achieved in the course of the intervention.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 04/2007; 43(3):136-42. DOI:10.1016/S1579-2129(07)60037-8 · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The paucity of long-term studies makes it difficult to evaluate the sustained abstinence over time of smokers who quit. The objective of the present study was to determine to what extent the results of tobacco cessation interventions are maintained after 5 years. Patients and methods This was a longitudinal prospective study of 502 smokers. The design was quasi-experimental given that therapy was allocated according to the level of the patients’ nicotine dependence: routine minimum intervention for smokers with mild addiction and those not in the preparation stage, and nicotine replacement therapy for patients with moderate-to-high dependence and/or a high level of tobacco consumption. Results Of the 267 patients followed for 5 years, 29.6% quit and were still abstinent at 1 year, and 18.0% remained abstinent after 5 years. Of those who had managed to stop smoking within 2 months of starting the intervention, 47.4% were still abstinent on follow-up at 5 years while 88.1% of those who failed to quit within 2 months were still smoking 5 years later. Conclusions The results observed during the action stage could be of use in reorienting the treatment approach, and a planned schedule of follow-up contacts could help patients maintain the abstinence achieved in the course of the intervention.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 03/2007; 43(3):136–142. DOI:10.1157/13099529 · 1.82 Impact Factor