Are you D Kreditor?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)12.03 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to provide preliminary data on the tolerability and effectiveness of citalopram for patients with dysthymic disorder. Twenty-one adult subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for dysthymic disorder were enrolled in this 12-week open-label study, of whom 15 had pure dysthymia (e.g. no major depression in the past 2 years). Citalopram was initiated at 20 mg/day, and increased to a maximum of 60 mg/day. Response was defined as 50% or greater drop in score on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and a Clinical Global Impressions-I score of 1 ('very much improved') or 2 ('much improved'). Of these 15 pure dysthymic disorder subjects, all completed the trial, and 11 (73.3%) were treatment responders. All paired sample t-tests were highly significant, demonstrating significant average improvement on all measures of symptomatology and functioning. Scores on the 24-item HDRS decreased from 22.3+/-4.3 at baseline to 9.1+/-7.8 at week 12 [t(14)=6.1, P<0.001]. In addition, improvement was noted in self-reported measures of temperament and social functioning. The average final dose of citalopram was 39 mg/day. Side-effects were reported by nine of 15 subjects (60%), most frequently gastrointestinal symptoms (n=5), dry mouth (n=5) and sexual side-effects (n=3). These findings suggest the effectiveness and tolerability of citalopram in treating dysthymic disorder. Double-blind prospective studies are needed comparing citalopram both to placebo and to other medications, assessing both initial and sustained response to treatment.
    International Clinical Psychopharmacology 05/2004; 19(3):143-8. · 2.71 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many studies of antidepressants in the treatment of dysthymic disorder (DD) have been conducted, but none has included bupropion sustained-release (SR). The aim of this study was to provide preliminary data on the tolerability and effectiveness of bupropion SR for patients with DD. Twenty-one adult subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for DD were enrolled in this 8-week open-label study. Bupropion SR was initiated at 150 mg/day and was increased to a maximum of 200 mg, twice daily. Response was defined as a 50% or greater decrease in score on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Of these 21 subjects, 15 (71.4%) responded to treatment. All paired sample t-tests were highly significant, demonstrating average improvement on all measures of symptomatology and functioning. Subject scores on the HAM-D decreased from 21.7 +/- 5.6 at baseline to 5.9 +/- 3.6 at week 8 (t[19] = 12.74, p < 0.001). The average final dosage was 364 mg/day. None of the subjects dropped out during the trial. Patients with a history of alcohol or chemical abuse were significantly less likely to respond to bupropion. Side effects were reported by eight subjects (38.1%), and the most frequently reported effects were headache, decreased appetite, insomnia, gastrointestinal problems, restlessness, and tremulousness. These findings suggest the effectiveness and high tolerability of bupropion SR for the treatment of DD. Double-blind prospective studies are needed for the comparison of bupropion SR to both placebo and other medications, assessing both initial and sustained responses to treatment.
    Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 06/2001; 21(3):325-9. · 3.51 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients with dysthymia have been shown to respond to treatment with antidepressant medications, and to some degree to psychotherapy. Even patients successfully treated with medication often have residual symptoms and impaired psychosocial functioning. The authors describe a prospective randomized 36-week study of dysthymic patients, comparing continued treatment with antidepressant medication (fluoxetine) alone and medication with the addition of group therapy treatment. After an 8-week trial of fluoxetine, medication-responsive subjects were randomly assigned to receive either continued medication only or medication plus 16 sessions of manualized group psychotherapy. Results provide preliminary evidence that group therapy may provide additional benefit to medication-responding dysthymic patients, particularly in interpersonal and psychosocial functioning.
    The Journal of psychotherapy practice and research 02/2001; 10(2):93-103.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of antidepressant medications in the treatment of dysthymia, or chronic mild depression. Venlafaxine blocks reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine and may produce a more complete antidepressant response than do single-mechanism selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The purpose of this open-label study was to provide preliminary data on the tolerability and effectiveness of venlafaxine for patients with dysthymia. Twenty-two dysthymic subjects (DSM-III-R criteria) were enrolled in this 10-week, open-label trial, and 5 dropped out prior to their second visit. Seventeen subjects (77.3%) received more than 1 week of medication. Of these 17 subjects, 13 (76.5%) were treatment responders. Results of paired sample t tests were highly significant, indicating that, on average, there was significant improvement on all measures of symptomatology and functioning, with mean +/- SD scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression decreasing from 20.95 +/- 6.50 at baseline to 6.06 +/- 5.49 at week 10. The mean +/- SD final dose was 178.68 +/- 70.80 mg/day. Side effects were reported by 17 (85%) of the 20 subjects for whom tolerability was assessed (the most common were fatigue, dry mouth, and nausea); 5 (22.7%) of 22 patients discontinued treatment because of side effects, primarily nausea (N = 3). These findings suggest the benefit of venlafaxine in the treatment of chronic depression and the need for more rigorous studies.
    The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 01/2000; 60(12):845-9. · 5.81 Impact Factor