Douglas A Richesson

National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

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Publications (17)124.62 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Obesity strongly increases the risk of endometrial cancer and is projected to increase current and future endometrial cancer incidence. In order to fully understand endometrial cancer incidence, one should also examine both hysterectomy, which eliminates future risk of endometrial cancer, and endometrial hyperplasia (EH), a precursor that prompts treatment (including hysterectomy). Hysterectomy and EH are more common than endometrial cancer, but data on simultaneous temporal trends of EH, hysterectomy and endometrial cancer are lacking. We used linked pathology, tumor registry, surgery and administrative datasets at the Kaiser Permanente Northwest Health Plan to calculate age-adjusted and age-specific rates, 1980-2003, of EH only (N = 5,990), EH plus hysterectomy (N = 904), hysterectomy without a diagnosis of EH or cancer (N = 14,926) and endometrial cancer (N = 1,208). Joinpoint regression identified inflection points and quantified annual percentage changes (APCs). The EH APCs were -5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = -7.4% to -3.2%) for 1980-1990, -12.9% (95% CI = -15.6% to -10.1%) for 1990-1999 and 2.4% (95% CI = -6.6% to 12.2%) for 1999-2003. The EH-plus-hysterectomy APCs were -8.6% (95% CI = -10.6% to -6.5%) for 1980-2000 and 24.5% (95% CI = -16.5% to 85.7%) for 2000-2003. Hysterectomy rates did not significantly change over time. The endometrial cancer APCs were -6.5% (95% CI = -10.3% to -2.6%) for 1980-1988 and 1.4% (95% CI = -0.2% to 3.0%) for 1988-2003. Hysterectomy rates were unchanged, but increased endometrial cancer incidence after 1988 and the reversal, in 1999, of the longstanding decline in EH incidence could reflect the influence of obesity on endometrial neoplasia.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2012; 131(8):1921-9. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE The severity of endometrial hyperplasia (EH)-simple (SH), complex (CH), or atypical (AH)-influences clinical management, but valid estimates of absolute risk of clinical progression to carcinoma are lacking. Materials and METHODS We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of 7,947 women diagnosed with EH (1970-2002) at one prepaid health plan who remained at risk for at least 1 year. Patient cases (N = 138) were diagnosed with carcinoma, on average, 6 years later (range, 1 to 24 years). Patient controls (N = 241) were matched to patient cases on age at EH, date of EH, and duration of follow-up, and they were counter-matched to patient cases on EH severity. After we independently reviewed original slides and medical records of patient controls and patient cases, we combined progression relative risks (AH v SH, CH, or disordered proliferative endometrium [ie, equivocal EH]) from the case-control analysis with clinical censoring information (ie, hysterectomy, death, or left the health plan) on all cohort members to estimate interval-specific (ie, 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years) and cumulative (ie, through 4, 9, and 19 years) progression risks. Results For nonatypical EH, cumulative progression risk increased from 1.2% (95% CI, 0.6% to 1.9%) through 4 years to 1.9% (95% CI, 1.2% to 2.6%) through 9 years to 4.6% (95% CI, 3.3% to 5.8%) through 19 years after EH diagnosis. For AH, cumulative risk increased from 8.2% (95% CI, 1.3% to 14.6%) through 4 years to 12.4% (95% CI, 3.0% to 20.8%) through 9 years to 27.5% (95% CI, 8.6% to 42.5%) through 19 years after AH. CONCLUSION Cumulative 20-year progression risk among women who remain at risk for at least 1 year is less than 5% for nonatypical EH but is 28% for AH.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2010; 28(5):788-92. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reasons for higher incidence of lymphoid neoplasms among men than women are unknown. Because female sex hormones have immunomodulatory effects, reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use may affect risk for lymphoid malignancies. Previous epidemiologic studies on this topic have yielded conflicting results. Within the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort, we prospectively analyzed detailed, questionnaire-derived information on menstrual and reproductive factors and use of oral contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy among 134,074 US women. Using multivariable proportional hazards regression models, we estimated relative risks (RRs) for 85 plasma cell neoplasms and 417 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) identified during follow-up from 1996 to 2002. We observed no statistically significant associations between plasma cell neoplasms, NHL, or the 3 most common NHL subtypes and age at menarche, parity, age at first birth, oral contraceptive use or menopausal status at baseline. For menopausal hormone therapy use, overall associations between NHL and unopposed estrogen and estrogen plus progestin were null, with the potential exception of an inverse association (RR = 0.49, 95% CI, 0.25-0.96) between use of unopposed estrogen and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common NHL subtype, among women with a hysterectomy. These data do not support an important role for reproductive factors or exogenous hormones in modulating lymphomagenesis.
    International Journal of Cancer 07/2009; 124(11):2737-43. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Results from the Women's Health Initiative trial raise new questions regarding the effects of estrogen therapy (ET) and estrogen plus progestin therapy (EPT) on breast cancer risk. We analyzed data from 126,638 females, ages 50 to 71 years at baseline, who completed two questionnaires (1995--1996 and 1996--1997) as part of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Cohort Study and in whom 3,657 incident breast cancers were identified through June 30, 2002. Hormone-associated relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer were estimated via multivariable regression models. Among thin women (body mass index < 25 kg/m2), ET use was associated with a significant 60% excess risk after 10 years of use. EPT was associated with a significantly increased risk among women with intact uteri, with the highest risk among current, long-term (> or = 10 years) users (RR, 2.44; 95% CI, 2.13-2.79). These risks were slightly higher when progestins were prescribed continuously than sequentially (< 15 days/mo; respective RRs of 2.76 versus 2.01). EPT associations were strongest in thin women, but elevated risks persisted among heavy women. EPT use was strongly related to estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors, requiring consideration of this variable when assessing relationships according to other clinical features. For instance, ER- ductal tumors were unaffected by EPT use, but all histologic subgroups of ER+ tumors were increased, especially low-grade and mixed ductal-lobular tumors. Both ET and EPT were associated with breast cancer risks with the magnitude of increase varying according to body mass and clinical characteristics of the tumors.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 12/2008; 17(11):3150-60. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most risk factors for male breast cancer have been derived from retrospective studies that may reflect selective recall. In the prospective National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study, we studied 324 920 men, among whom 121 developed breast cancer. Men who reported a first-degree relative with breast cancer had an increased risk of breast cancer (relative risk [RR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19 to 3.09). Among the medical conditions examined, a new finding emerged regarding increased male breast cancer risk associated with a history of a bone fracture (RR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.24 to 3.91). Obesity was positively related to risk (RR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.10 to 2.91, for body mass indices of >or=30 vs <25 kg/m2) and physical activity inversely related, even after adjustment for body mass index. Smokers were at somewhat elevated risk, although trends with smoking characteristics were inconsistent. Alcohol consumption was not related to risk. The identified risk factors show some commonalities with female breast cancer and indicate the importance of hormonal mechanisms. Differences in risk factors may reflect unique mechanisms associated with androgens and their ratio to bioavailable estrogens.
    CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment 10/2008; 100(20):1477-81. · 14.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Histopathologic diagnosis of endometrial biopsies is used to estimate the risk of progression to carcinoma and guide clinical management. Problems with the widely used World Health Organization (WHO) system for classifying endometrial hyperplasia (EH) have prompted the development of an alternative system based on endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN). The authors estimated progression risk associated with EIN among endometrial biopsies in a nested case-control study of EH progression. Index biopsies with original community pathology diagnoses of disordered proliferative endometrium (DPEM) or EH that were independently confirmed by a panel of pathologists were independently reviewed and assigned EIN classifications (inadequate, benign, EIN, or cancer) by a second panel of pathologists. Cases (N = 138) progressed to carcinoma at least 1 year (median, 6 years) after their index biopsy. Controls (N = 241) also had EH, did not progress to carcinoma, and were individually matched to cases based on age at EH, date of EH, and length of follow-up. By using conditional logistic regression, the authors estimated relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for progression to carcinoma for EIN versus benign. In the EIN system, 71 (52.6%) cases and 159 (66.8%) controls were classified as benign and 42 (31.1%) cases and 65 (27.3%) controls were classified as EIN. The RR for EIN versus benign was 7.76 (95% CI, 3.36-17.91). In the WHO system, the RR for atypical hyperplasia (AH) versus DPEM, simple hyperplasia, or complex hyperplasia was 9.19 (95% CI, 3.87-21.83). Among women observed for at least 1 year after receiving a biopsy-based EH diagnosis, EIN and AH were both found to have similarly increased risks of progression to carcinoma.
    Cancer 09/2008; 113(8):2073-81. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Identifying which categories in the World Health Organization classification of endometrial hyperplasia contribute to suboptimal reproducibility is clinically important. A 2-member panel reviewed 209 endometrial biopsy/curettage specimens originally diagnosed as incident endometrial hyperplasia as part of a progression study. Original diagnoses included the following: disordered proliferative endometrium, simple hyperplasia, complex hyperplasia, and atypical hyperplasia; panel diagnoses also included negative and carcinoma. We assessed percentage agreement and kappa statistics+/-standard errors (K+/-SE). Original and panel diagnoses (combining negative with disordered proliferative endometrium; atypical hyperplasia with carcinoma) agreed for 34.9% of biopsies (K-unweighted+/-SE=0.18+/-0.03; K-weighted+/-SE=0.27+/-0.04). Panelists' diagnoses agreed (using 6 categories) for 51.7% of biopsies, corresponding to K-unweighted+/-SE=0.37+/-0.03, improving with weighting to K-weighted+/-SE=0.63+/-0.05. Reproducibility based on a 2-tier classification ([negative, disordered proliferative endometrium, simple hyperplasia, or complex hyperplasia] versus [atypical hyperplasia or carcinoma]) increased agreement between original and panel diagnoses to 82.8%, K-unweighted+/-SE=0.37+/-0.06, and between panelists to 87.0%, K-unweighted+/-SE=0.63+/-0.07. Agreement between panelists at a cutpoint of complex hyperplasia and more severe versus simple hyperplasia or less severe was 88.0%, K-unweighted+/-SE=0.72+/-0.07. Developing and prospectively testing a binary system of classifying endometrial hyperplasia on endometrial biopsy may aid efforts to improve interobserver reproducibility.
    International journal of gynecological pathology: official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists 08/2008; 27(3):318-25. · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inactivation of PTEN tumor suppressor gene is common in endometrial carcinoma and its precursor, atypical endometrial hyperplasia (EH). We compared PTEN expression via immunohistochemistry in endometrial biopsies diagnosed as EH in 138 cases, who were diagnosed with EH and then endometrial carcinoma at least 1 year later (median, 6 years), and 241 individually matched controls, who were diagnosed with EH but did not progress to carcinoma during equivalent follow-up. We assessed PTEN status (normal versus null) in index biopsies containing EH to estimate the relative risk (RR) of developing endometrial carcinoma up to 25 years later. Analysis of 115 cases and 193 controls with satisfactory assays revealed PTEN-null glands in index biopsies of 44% of cases and 49% of controls [P = 0.85; RR, 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.73-3.13]. For predicting progression to carcinoma, PTEN-null status had low sensitivity (44%; 95% CI, 45-54%) and specificity (51%; 95% CI, 44-58%). Among 105 cases with PTEN results for both index biopsy and carcinoma, 16% had a PTEN-null index biopsy, 23% had PTEN-null carcinoma, and 26% had both a PTEN-null index biopsy and carcinoma. Loss of PTEN expression in endometrial biopsies was neither associated with nor a sensitive and specific marker of subsequent progression to endometrial carcinoma.
    Cancer Research 07/2008; 68(14):6014-20. · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1)) associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER-positive (per-allele OR (95%CI) = 1.31 (1.27–1.36)) than ER-negative (1.08 (1.03–1.14)) disease (P for heterogeneity = 10−13). This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10−5, 10−8, 0.013, respectively). The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER-positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10−4, respectively). The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312) showed weak but significant associations with ER-negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 (1.14 (1.09–1.21)). rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis (per-allele HR = 0.90 (0.83–0.97). The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER-positive and ER-negative disease are biologically distinct. Understanding the etiologic heterogeneity of breast cancer may ultimately result in improvements in prevention, early detection, and treatment.
    PLoS Genetics 07/2008; · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1)) associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER-positive (per-allele OR (95%CI) = 1.31 (1.27–1.36)) than ER-negative (1.08 (1.03–1.14)) disease (P for heterogeneity = 10−13). This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10−5, 10−8, 0.013, respectively). The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER-positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10−4, respectively). The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312) showed weak but significant associations with ER-negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 (1.14 (1.09–1.21)). rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis (per-allele HR = 0.90 (0.83–0.97). The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER-positive and ER-negative disease are biologically distinct. Understanding the etiologic heterogeneity of breast cancer may ultimately result in improvements in prevention, early detection, and treatment.
    PLoS Genetics 07/2008; · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1)) associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER-positive (per-allele OR (95%CI) = 1.31 (1.27-1.36)) than ER-negative (1.08 (1.03-1.14)) disease (P for heterogeneity = 10(-13)). This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10(-5), 10(-8), 0.013, respectively). The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER-positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10(-4), respectively). The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312) showed weak but significant associations with ER-negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 (1.14 (1.09-1.21)). rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis (per-allele HR = 0.90 (0.83-0.97). The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER-positive and ER-negative disease are biologically distinct. Understanding the etiologic heterogeneity of breast cancer may ultimately result in improvements in prevention, early detection, and treatment.
    PLoS Genetics 05/2008; 4(4):e1000054. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1)) associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER-positive (per-allele OR (95%CI) = 1.31 (1.27–1.36)) than ER-negative (1.08 (1.03–1.14)) disease (P for heterogeneity = 10−13). This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10−5, 10−8, 0.013, respectively). The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER-positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10−4, respectively). The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312) showed weak but significant associations with ER-negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 (1.14 (1.09–1.21)). rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis (per-allele HR = 0.90 (0.83–0.97). The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER-positive and ER-negative disease are biologically distinct. Understanding the etiologic heterogeneity of breast cancer may ultimately result in improvements in prevention, early detection, and treatment.
    PLoS Genetics 04/2008; 4(4). · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Classifying endometrial hyperplasia (EH) according to the severity of glandular crowding (simple hyperplasia (SH) vs complex hyperplasia (CH)) and nuclear atypia (simple atypical hyperplasia (SAH) vs complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH)) should predict subsequent endometrial carcinoma risk, but data on progression are lacking. Our nested case-control study of EH progression included 138 cases, who were diagnosed with EH and then with carcinoma (1970-2003) at least 1 year (median, 6.5 years) later, and 241 controls, who were individually matched on age, date, and follow-up duration and counter-matched on EH classification. After centralised pathology panel and medical record review, we generated rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for treatment and repeat biopsies. With disordered proliferative endometrium (DPEM) as the referent, AH significantly increased carcinoma risk (RR=14, 95% CI, 5-38). Risk was highest 1-5 years after AH (RR=48, 95% CI, 8-294), but remained elevated 5 or more years after AH (RR=3.5, 95% CI, 1.0-9.6). Progression risks for SH (RR=2.0, 95% CI, 0.9-4.5) and CH (RR=2.8, 95% CI, 1.0-7.9) were substantially lower and only slightly higher than the progression risk for DPEM. The higher progression risks for AH could foster management guidelines based on markedly different progression risks for atypical vs non-atypical EH.
    British Journal of Cancer 02/2008; 98(1):45-53. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: By inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) decrease aromatase activity and might reduce breast cancer risk by suppressing estrogen synthesis. Epidemiologic evidence for a protective role of NSAIDs in breast cancer, however, is equivocal. We tested NSAID use for its association with breast cancer incidence in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study, where 127,383 female AARP (formerly known as the American Association of Retired Persons) members with no history of cancer, aged 51 to 72 years, completed a mailed questionnaire (1996 to 1997). We estimated relative risks of breast cancer for NSAID exposures using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. The state cancer registry and mortality index linkage identified 4,501 primary incident breast cancers through 31 December 2003, including 1,439 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cancers and 280 ER-negative cancers. Proportional hazards models revealed no statistically significant association between overall NSAIDs and total breast cancer. As cyclooxygenase inhibition by aspirin (but not other NSAIDs) is irreversible, we tested associations by NSAID type. Although we observed no significant differences in risk for daily use (versus nonuse) of aspirin (relative risk = 0.93, 95% confidence interval = 0.85 to 1.01) or nonaspirin NSAIDS (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.87 to 1.05), risk of ER-positive breast cancer was significantly reduced with daily aspirin use (relative risk = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.71 to 0.98)--a relationship not observed for nonaspirin NSAIDS. Neither aspirin nor nonaspirin NSAIDs were associated with risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Breast cancer risk was not significantly associated with NSAID use, but daily aspirin use was associated with a modest reduction in ER-positive breast cancer. Our results provide support for further evaluating relationships by NSAID type and breast cancer subtype.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 02/2008; 10(2):R38. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that breast cancer hormone receptor status varies by etiologic factors, but studies have been inconsistent. In a population-based case-control study in Poland that included 2,386 cases and 2,502 controls, we assessed ER-alpha and PR status of tumors based on clinical records according to etiologic exposure data collected via interview. For 842 cancers, we evaluated ER-alpha, ER-beta, PR and HER2 levels by semiquantitative microscopic scoring of immunostained tissue microarrays and a quantitative immunofluorescence method, automated quantitative analysis (AQUAtrade mark). We related marker levels in tumors to etiologic factors, using standard regression models and novel statistical methods, permitting adjustment for both correlated tumor features and exposures. Results obtained with different assays were generally consistent. Receptor levels varied most significantly with body mass index (BMI), a factor that was inversely related to risk among premenopausal women and directly related to risk among postmenopausal women with larger tumors. After adjustment for correlated markers, exposures and pathologic characteristics, PR and HER2 AQUA levels were inversely related to BMI among premenopausal women (p-trend = 0.01, both comparisons), whereas among postmenopausal women, PR levels were associated directly with BMI (p-trend = 0.002). Among postmenopausal women, analyses demonstrated that BMI was related to an interaction of PR and HER2: odds ratio (OR) = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.69-1.07) for low PR and HER2 expression vs. OR = 1.78 (95% CI = 1.25-2.55) for high expression (p-heterogeneity = 0.001). PR and HER2 levels in breast cancer vary by BMI, suggesting a heterogeneous etiology for tumors related to these markers.
    International Journal of Cancer 10/2007; 121(5):1079-85. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Telomeres, consisting of TTAGGG nucleotide repeats and a protein complex at chromosome ends, are critical for maintaining chromosomal stability. Genomic instability, following telomere crisis, may contribute to breast cancer pathogenesis. Many genes critical in telomere biology have limited nucleotide diversity, thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this pathway could contribute to breast cancer risk. In a population-based study of 1995 breast cancer cases and 2296 controls from Poland, 24 SNPs representing common variation in POT1, TEP1, TERF1, TERF2 and TERT were genotyped. We did not identify any significant associations between individual SNPs or haplotypes and breast cancer risk; however, data suggested that three correlated SNPs in TERT (-1381C>T, -244C>T, and Ex2-659G>A) may be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer among individuals with a family history of breast cancer (odds ratios 0.73, 0.66, and 0.57, 95% confidence intervals 0.53-1.00, 0.46-0.95 and 0.39-0.84, respectively). In conclusion, our data do not support substantial overall associations between SNPs in telomere pathway genes and breast cancer risk. Intriguing associations with variants in TERT among women with a family history of breast cancer warrant follow-up in independent studies.
    British Journal of Cancer 09/2007; 97(6):832-6. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a carrier protein that modulates the bio-availability of serum sex steroid hormones, which may be involved in ovarian cancer. We evaluated whether common genetic variation in SHBG and its 3' neighbor ATP1B2, in linkage disequilibrium, is associated with the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. The study population included 264 women with ovarian carcinoma and 625 controls participating in a population-based case-control study in Poland. Five common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SHGB and five in ATP1B2 were selected to capture most common variation in this region. None of the SNPs evaluated was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk, including the putative functional SNPs SHBG D356N (rs6259) and -67G>A 5'UTR (rs1799941). However, our data were consistent with a decreased ovarian cancer risk associated with the variant alleles for these two SNPs, which have been previously associated with increased circulating levels of SHBG. These data do not support a substantial association between common genetic variation in SHBG and ovarian cancer risk.
    BMC Cancer 01/2007; 7:60. · 3.33 Impact Factor