Cristina L Swanson

University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, Colorado, United States

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Publications (4)34.91 Total impact

  • Cristina L Swanson, Roberta Pelanda, Raul M Torres
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    ABSTRACT: B lymphocytes are often considered a homogenous population. However, B cells in both mouse and humans are comprised of distinct subpopulations that differ in development, phenotype, function, and microenvironmental niches. Much of our understanding about how these different B-cells populations mount antibody responses has been derived from experimental findings in mouse models and based on the use of model antigens. These reductionist studies performed over decades have been invaluable in defining the parameters of the B-cell antibody response to different types of antigens. However, these antigens also are now known to differ in a significant manner from bona fide physiological pathogens, and precisely how these different B-cell subsets divide labor in the primary humoral immune defense of pathogens is less well understood. While there are no absolutes in this area, there are recurring themes that divide the roles of B-cell subsets to different arms of the antibody response. This review provides an overview of rules that govern the B-cell labor roles, exceptions that break these rules, and models that have been used to define them.
    Immunologic Research 09/2012; · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rare dual-reactive B cells expressing two types of Ig light or heavy chains have been shown to participate in immune responses and differentiate into IgG(+) cells in healthy mice. These cells are generated more often in autoreactive mice, leading us to hypothesize they might be relevant in autoimmunity. Using mice bearing Igk allotypic markers and a wild-type Ig repertoire, we demonstrate that the generation of dual-κ B cells increases with age and disease progression in autoimmune-prone MRL and MRL/lpr mice. These dual-reactive cells express markers of activation and are more frequently autoreactive than single-reactive B cells. Moreover, dual-κ B cells represent up to half of plasmablasts and memory B cells in autoimmune mice, whereas they remain infrequent in healthy mice. Differentiation of dual-κ B cells into plasmablasts is driven by MRL genes, whereas the maintenance of IgG(+) cells is partly dependent on Fas inactivation. Furthermore, dual-κ B cells that differentiate into plasmablasts retain the capacity to secrete autoantibodies. Overall, our study indicates that dual-reactive B cells significantly contribute to the plasmablast and memory B cell populations of autoimmune-prone mice suggesting a role in autoimmunity.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 08/2012; 209(10):1797-812. · 13.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Humoral immunity to viruses and encapsulated bacteria is comprised of T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) antibody responses that are characterized by rapid antibody production by marginal zone and B1 B cells. We demonstrate that toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands influence the TI-2 antibody response not only by enhancing the overall magnitude but also by skewing this response to one that is dominated by IgG isotypes. Importantly, TLR ligands facilitate this response by inducing type I interferon (IFN), which in turn elicits rapid and significant amounts of antigen-specific IgG2c predominantly from FO (follicular) B cells. Furthermore, we show that although the IgG2c antibody response requires B cell-autonomous IFN-alpha receptor signaling, it is independent of B cell-intrinsic TLR signaling. Thus, innate signals have the capacity to enhance TI-2 antibody responses by promoting participation of FO B cells, which then elaborate effective IgG anti-pathogen antibodies.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 07/2010; 207(7):1485-500. · 13.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although IgM serves as a first barrier to Ag spreading, the cellular and molecular mechanisms following B lymphocyte activation that lead to IgM secretion are not fully understood. By virtue of their anatomical location, marginal zone (MZ) B cells rapidly generate Ag-specific IgM in response to blood-borne pathogens and play an important role in the protection against these potentially harmful Ags. In this study, we have explored the contribution of TLR agonists to MZ B cell activation and mobilization as well as their ability to promote primary IgM responses in a mouse model. We demonstrate that diverse TLR agonists stimulate MZ B cells to become activated and leave the MZ through pathways that are differentially dependent on MyD88 and IFN-alphabeta receptor signaling. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of MZ B cells with TLR agonists led to a reduction in the expression of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors expressed by MZ B cells and/or increased CD69 cell surface levels. Importantly, as adjuvants for a T cell-dependent protein Ag, TLR agonists were found to accelerate the kinetics but not magnitude of the Ag-specific IgM response. Together, these data demonstrate that in vivo TLR agonist treatment enhances the early production of Ag-specific IgM and activates MZ B cells to promote their relocation.
    The Journal of Immunology 04/2008; 180(6):3882-8. · 5.52 Impact Factor